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ST6NT0R 



lake roee^t 

COLLEGE 



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The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, November 1, 1918. 



NUMBERS 1 & 2. 



Dr. Raymond 

Lake Forest College was unusually 
fortunate this year in securing Dr. 
Raymond to fill the places left va- 
cant by the absence of Dr. Halsey 
and Professor Burnap. Dr. Raymond 
is a graduate of Northwestern Uni- 
versity, but received his Ph. D. at the 
University of Chicago. For the last 
five years he has lectured in Political 
Science at the University of Cali- 
fornia. Previously he was a member 
of the faculty of the University of 
Chicago. Dr. Raymond has traveled 
extensively in Europe and Asia. He 
has spent a year in India, and has 
visited Egypt, Asia, Japan and Tur- 
key as well as Russia, Finland, Ice- 
land, Norway, Sweden, Spain and 
Portugal. This year Dr. Raymond 
was engaged to lecture in New York 
City, Philadelphia, and other eastern 
cities and also at several western 
universities. He has canceled these 
engagements and is giving us the 
benefit of his wide experience and 
knowledge in Economics and in the 
War Aims Course. 



The Students' Army Training 
Corps at Lake Forest 



Girls' War Work 
Organized 

Under the able direction of Miss 
Hamilton the girls of Lois Durand 
Hall have formed an organization for 
war relief work. Knitting, Red Cross 
work, Y. W. C. A. work, and buying 
of thrift stamps and liberty bonds 
are some of the things they intend 
to do. 

The organization is headed by an 
executive committee consisting of 
Harriet Harris, ex officio chairman, 
Ruth Stommel, Eloise Brown, Sarah 
Moore, Eleanor Goble, Sarah Fisher, 
Helen Lockard, and Lucy Knox. 

A start toward active work has al- 
ready been made. The girls have 
divided into squads and have signed 
up for regular hours at the Village 
Red Cross Rooms. Thrift stamps 
are being sold on the campus twice a 
week. Owing to the quarantine the 
girls were rather late in getting 
started in the Liberty Bond Campaign 
but a committee of Lois Durand 



For over a month the Lake Forest 
unit of the Students' Army Training 
Corps consisting of about one hun- 
dred and fifty men, has been operat- 
ing under the new system prescribed 
by the War Department. With the 
unusual natural advantages and 
splendid equipment of the College, 
this unit should be one of the most 
successful ones in this part of the 
country. Visitors to the campus who 
have observed conditions at large 
universities and other colleges have 
been very emphatic in their expres- 
sions of surprise and pleasure over 
the unusually smooth and successful 
operation of the army system here. 
At present there are three commis- 
sioned officers on the grounds : Lieut. 
Thompson, commander of the post, 
Lieut. Axelrod, personnel adjutant, 
and Lieut. Brown in charge of ord- 
nance. 

The courses of study have been 
laid out according to the plan pre- 
scribed by the government. The 
men are divided into age-groups and 
have a choice between programs of 
study preparing them for different 
branches of the service. Due to the 
unusually large number of students 
taking courses in the Department of 
Mathematics and Romance Languages 
it has been found necessary to ap- 
point additional instructors. Profes- 
sor McNeill has secured the assis- 
tance of Mr. Curzin, an experienced 
teacher of mathematics, and Profes- 
sor Van Steenderen has added Mr. 
Gould to the staff of his department. 
Through long residence and contin- 
ued study in France and Italy Mr. 
Gould has become an efficient teacher 
of the languages of the two countries. 



While many institutions have only 
hastily constructed wooden shacks for 
barracks and mess hall, Lake Forest 
has ample room in modern dormitor- 
ies and a finely appointed men's com- 
mons, large enough to serve as mess 
hall for the whole unit. The campus 
affords extensive grounds for pur- 
poses of drill, its broken and varied 
expanse, with deep ravines, making 
it possible to carry out many differ- 
ent military exercises. The gym- 
nasium is large enough for purposes 
of drill in inclement weather. Fur- 
thermore, the Fort Sheridan rifle 
ranges are within easy walking dis- 
tance. These advantages impressed 
one visiting officer so strongly that 
he remarked with enthusiasm, "I 
should like nothing better after the 
war than to be Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics in a college like 
this." 

A large part of the main floor 
of College Hall has been taken over 
by the Military Department. At the 
north end are the offices of the com- 
mander and personnel adjutant; ad- 
jacent are Lieut. Thompson's lecture 
room and an ordnance store room. 
It is now proposed to merge the Col- 
lege Book Store in a Post Exchange 
under army control where the usual 
small necessaries and luxuries will 
be sold. 

Military drill and campus life has 
been enlivened by music from the 
military band which has been organ- 
ized from the members of the S.A. 
T.C. It is being carried on under 
very efficient leadership and is an im- 
portant factor in producing the spirit 
and pep necessary for carrying out 
the army routine. 



girls succeeded in selling $ 1S00 worth 
of bonds to sixteen subscribers. 

The girls are all earnest and en- 
thusiastic about the work. They all 
feel that with conditions as they are 
it is up to each one to make the most 
of every bit of her time. We are ex- 
pecting great things from them this 
year. 



Mildred Zenos spent last week-end 
at her home in Chicago. 

Ruth Bridgman's father visited her 
last week-end. 

Doris McDowell was the guest of 
Lorraine Maclay. 

Ruth Kennedy entertained her 
mother last week-end. 



3> \ Co S G 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the collegiate 
year by the students of Lake Forest 
College. 



Board of Editors 

Lillian Evans '19 

Harriet Harris '19 

Gwendolyn Massey '19 

Lydia Sprecher '19 

Ruth Stommel '19 

Mildred Zenos '19 

Ralph Stewart '20 

Eleanor Goble '21 
Business Managers. 

Agnes Hoffman 

Margaret Horton 

Reporters 

Sarah Moore '21 
Philip Speidel '19 
Otis Chatfield-Taylor '21 
Prof. W. R. Bridgeman 

Faculty and Alumni. 



Subscription Rates 

One year $2.00 

Ten issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice at Lake Forest, 
Illinois, as second class matter. 



AT the moment of writing this 
editorial the papers are full 
of the plea of the new Ger- 
man chancellor for an armistice dur- 
ing which peace terms are to be dis- 
cussed. All the leading men of the 
country seem to be united in de- 
nouncing this plea as merely another 
German trick, this time with the 
purpose of negotiating peace while 
Germany still holds Belgium and 
other conquered and outraged terri- 
tory as "a pawn." There can be no 
peace until the German armies are 
all driven back onto their own soil. 
On this point the allies seem to be 
agreed, and it is to be hoped that 
they will stay agreed. 

A peace drive by Germany is bound 
to have one effect, whether or not it 
is successful otherwise. This effect 
is to make some short-sighted in- 
dividuals slacken up in their efforts 
to win the war, believing it has al- 
ready reached, the beginning of the 
end. It is to be hoped that none 
such are enrolled in Lake Forest Col- 
lege, and that we are all going to 
pull together and work' our hardest 
for a threefold object. First, to train 
to help bring the war to a speedy 
conclusion which will leave no doubt 
as to the absolute defeat of Prussian 
Militarism; second, to make the S. A. 
T. C. at Lake Forest the best to be 
found; and third, by application to 
the work in hand to make the most of 
the opportunities which are here in 
such abundance to -make ourselves 
better and more useful men. 



Ruth Bridgman had as her guest 
Jeanette La Torce from the Univer- 
sity of Chicago. 

Sigma Tau Sorority announces the 
pledging of Lorraine Maclay. 



Squabs Right! 
Hootch! 

If a pun were not the lowest form 
of wit, and this column were not a 
purveyor of distinctly high grade hu- 
mor, we should be tempted to start 
out the good work by remarking 
that Mc Evoy has a Bea in his bon- 
net, or something like that, but, — 
oh what's the use? 

There have been numerous cares 
and worries attendant to the change 
of dear old Lake Forest College to a 
military, but the thing that has made 
us lose the most weight has been try- 
ing to figure out what keeps Corporal 
(I beg your pardon, Sergeant) Bos- 
worth from falling through the rath- 
er ample neck band of his blouse. 

A story is current to the effect that 
shortly after "Admiral" Locke blos- 
somed out in his full regimental re- 
galia, that the following ensued ; 
Locke walked past Lieutenant 
Thompson and failed to salute him. 
The lieutenant reprimanded him at 
which Locke replied, "Yes, I knew I 
should salute you, but I've been doing 
it for a week now, and I thought I 
knew you well enough so I didn't 
have to any more!" The lieutenant 
was a bit taken aback by that, but 
being a patient man, started to ex- 
plain, but with the necessary military 
gruffness. Pointing to the insignia 
on his shoulder he said, "Don't you 
see that?" "Yes," said Locke, "but 
what are you crabbing about? Look 
at the uniform they gave me!" 

On Sunday there were many ru- 
mors flying about to the effect that 
the war was over, and we went to 
bed with a feeling of elation and re- 
lief. This feeling was however ab- 
sent at six o'clock Monday morning 
when we were awakened from dreams 
of peace by the clarion tones of the 
bugler sounding first call. "Some- 
body's always taking the joy out of 
life!" O. C. T. 

The Garglers' Union of Lois Dur- 
and Hall respectfully submits the fol- 
lowing touching ballad : 
D-doebels', measley d'doebels' 
That's the only, only stuff that I adore 
When, the m-moon shines o'er the 

• pest house 
I'll be g-gargling doebels' like a 
t'troubadour. 

Gladys Armstrong, ex '22, visited 
on the campus for a few minutes last 
week end. 

Beatrice Worthley spent last week- 
end in Ottawa. 



The Garrick Club 

Under the able leadership of its 
new director, Mr. W. Chilton Trout- 
man, the Garrick Club promises us 
an unusually successful season. Mr. 
Troutman graduated from the East- 
ern Illinois Normal School in 1912. 
He taught in a high school from 
1912 to 1915. From 1915 to 1917 
he did graduate work at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois, taking his Masters de- 
gree last year. A more complete ac- 
count of the Garrick Club's plans for 
the next year will appear next week. 



THE GIRLS of Lois Durand 
Hall have been roused from 
their slumbering and passive- 
ness. They are wakened every morn- 
ing by the bugle which blows out in 
the cold grey dawn, but their great 
incentive to action is their new dean, 
Miss Hamilton. 

All of us have within us that great 
desire to be of service but the life 
at the Hall has been the same for so 
many years that it has been hard for 
us to accept any ideas which were 
radically different from our accus- 
tomed habits. Consequently our 
deans have had a hard problem in 
trying to help us out of the rut into 
which our school life had fallen. 

This year, due partly to the ur- 
gent need of the times and to the 
realization that we have been idling 
away our time, we have decided to 
be of some use. 

We have come to know Miss Hamil- 
ton well. We recognize in her a 
woman of the ideals for which we all 
are striving and one who is capable 
of leading us to our goal. She sees 
that our faults are numerous and 
with her aid in pointing them out 
and prescribing the remedy, we in- 
tend to make them fewer. She real- 
izes that even though we are women 
of college age, we still give fun a 
big place in our curriculum. She 
does not discourage this part of our 
life but rather encourages us to see 
the still greater possibilities for en- 
joyment in some service. 

Now is the time for action and 
under the leadership of Miss Hamil- 
ton we intend to make this year at 
Lois Durand Hall, a year never to be 
forgotten, a year in which greater 
things are to be accomplished than 
ever have been before. 



Anna Glenn was the guest of Mar- 
garet Mills and Marian Preston in 
Chicago last week-end. 



THE STENTOR 



The Present Enroll- 
ment 

The total number of students ac- 
tually registered to date is 251 of 
whom 15 have dropped out for vari- 
ous reasons. Of the 236 remain- 
ing only 77 are holdovers from last 
year, 15 seniors, 18 juniors, and 44 
sophomores: hence the new students 
number 159, of whom 35 are women. 
Probably a very few more men will be 
admitted up to October 31, the limit 
set by the government for admission 
to the present S. A. T. C. A list of 
the new-comes follows: 

Women, JUNIOR — 

Forence E. Metzger, Joliet. 

SOPHOMORE— 

Garnette A. Higbee, Marengo. 
Lorraine B. Maclay, Dubuque, la. 
Katherine Winters, Highland Park 

FRESHMAN — 

Rebecca Armstrong, Ottumwa, la. 
Ruth M. Bahlert, Pound, Wise. 
Helen M. Barnthouse, Ottumwa, la, 
Ruth B. Bridgman, Ottumwa, la, 
Mary D. Burnett, Waukegan. 
F. Josephine Clarke, Independence, 

Iowa. 
Elsie H. Engle, Ottawa. 
Sara H. Fisher, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Mildred Gerlach, Chicago. 
Gertrude Gifford, Waukegan. 
Rhoda A. Gray, Waukegan. 
Julia M. Hoffman, Dyer, Ind. 
Kathryn I. Horton, Escanaba, 

Mich. 
Helen G. Hoyer, Oelwein, la. 
Elaine J. Kellogg, Chicago. 
Ruth G. Kennedy, Wheatfleld, Ind. 
Ruth G. Kenyon, Elgin. 
Helen D. Lockard, Raton. N. M. 
Margaret A. Mills, Chicago. 
Vera F. Pettigrew, Harvey. 
Gladys M. Reichert, Chicago. 
Blanche D. Shaddle, Area. 
Ruth A Shaddle, Area. 
Flora J. Sattuck, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Lillian L. Stephens, Mt. Vernon, 

Indiana. 
Mary E. Thayer, Chicago. 
Edith G. Wise, Freeport. 

SPECIALS — 

Vesta V. Votaw, School of Music. 
Mrs. Albert J. Jongewaard, 

Waukegan. 
Florence K. Edger, Alice Home. 
Helen Carroll, Terry Hall. 



In the following list of men those 
entering with advanced standing are 
indicated. 

Donald Adkins, Elgin. 
Reinold C. Anderson, Rockford. 
Harold H. Baldwin, Carpentersville. 



Johu F. Baker, Aurora. 

Frederick C. Bartol, Warsaw, Ind. 

Merton J. Beck, Freeport. 

Ralph D. Beddoes, Freeport. 

Thomas Bermingham, Lake Forest. 

Joseph F. Black, Gary, Ind. 

Charles A. Boehner, Aurora. 

Arthur J. Brisbin, Elgin. 

Walter I. Brown, Elgin. 

Vernal R. Brown, Ottumwa, la. 

Carlos E. Burger, Elgin. 

Floyd M. Byers, Genoa. 

Frederick W. Chamberlain, Chicago. 

Allin J. Coder, Elgin. 

Howard B. Cornwall, Elgin. 

Ernest G. Cox, Antioch. 

James A. Crawford, Elgin. 

Alvah M. Custer, Logansport, Ind. 

Harold C. Daniels, Lake Villa. 

Howard Dickey, Jonesboro, Ind. 

James H. Dougan (Soph.), Oneida. 

John P. Dougherty, Freeport. 

Waldemar E. Echterling, Chicago 

Heights. 
Ralph H. Ekvall, Rockford. 
Horace P. Emerson, Ottumwa, la. 
Conrad A. Engwall, Akron, O. 
Earl W. Fevier, Elgin. 
Herman Fischer, Elgin. 
Robert W. Framberg, Chicago. 
Leonard A. Friebele, Highland Park. 
Elmer G. Giertz, Elgin. 
Clark M. Greenlee, Winnebago. 
Joseph L. Guler, South Bend, Ind. 
Vernie C. Gustafson, Rockford. 
Albert A. Hale, Canton. 
Raymond K. Hand, Marengo. 
Clifford M. Harris, Jonesboro, Ind. 
George B. Hedges, Elgin. 
Charles L. Hines, Elgin. 
Arthur E. Hollatz, Chicago. 
Mark H. Hough, Elgin. 
Leonard H. Huffer, Warsaw, Ind. 
Ernest H. Humphrey, Belvidere. 
Raymond C. Hunn, Elgin. 
Elmer W. Johnson, Rockford. 
Harold W. Johnson, Marengo. 
Roy V. Johnson, Belvidere. 
Boyd J. Jury, Belvidere. 
Roy F. Kappes, Aurora. 
Harold T. Keister, Freeport. 
Frederick R. Kelley, Marengo. 
Orville L. Kiltz, Elgin. 
Walter M. Kinney, Elgin. 
Hugh J. Kotschi, Taylorville. 
Clifford W. Krueger, Elgin. 
Henry J. Kunz, Freeport. 
Carl D. Lagerstrom, Elgin. 
Edwin A. Lamphere, Carpentersville. 
Gilbert H. Large, Owaneco. 
Francis C. Liddle, Rockford. 
Willmer I. Liddle, Rockford. 
Lucius Lobdell, Wayne, Mich. 
Wilbur W. Locke, La Salle. 
Ned H. McCormack (Soph.), La Salle. 
Willis B. Mallory, Elgin. 
Kenneth R. Mason, Elgin. 
Clarence C. Mayer, Freeport. 
Kenneth W. Mayo, St. Anne. 



Claud B. Miller, Warsaw, Ind. 

Elwood C. Miller, Graham, Mo. 

Elliott D. Moore, Lake Forest. 

Norman G. Mueller, Elgin. 

Morris Mudge (Soph.), Peru. 

George J. Murch, Chicago. 

Harold J. Murphy, Aurora. 

Harry L. Myers, Freeport. 

Arthur S. Nichols, Chicago. 

John B. Noble, Valparaiso, Ind. 

Leon T. Noel, Maitland, Mo. 

Cecil F. Norris, Jonesboro. 

Frank L. O'Neill, Elgin. 

Glenn J. Otto, Chicago. 

Louis A. Passow, Chicago. 

Alfred G. Plantin, Lake Forest. 

Jessie G. Pratt, Valparaiso, Ind. 

William F. Pratt (Junior), Elmyra, 
N. Y. 

Frank W. Prohl, Hammond, Ind. 

Paul M. Pryde, Elgin. 

Edwin F. Rathke, Rockford. 

Emil W. Rauschert, Elgin. 

Russel W. Rice, LaSalle. 

Rollin R. Rippberger, Elgin. 

Don M. Rodgers, Ottumwa, la. 

Lloyd C. Roseen, LaSalle. 

Harry L. Russel, Elgin. 

Earle R. Ryan, Dundee. 

John H. Schick, Ottumwa, la. 

Harold G. Schields, Elgin. 

Paul M. Schlager, Elgin. 

Herbert Schleman, (Soph.), Valpar- 
aiso, Ind. 

Arthur H. Seymour, Carpentersville. 

Fred M. Sheehan, Antioch. 

William G. Shontz, Leetonia, O. 

Edwin J. Sierks, Valparaiso, Ind. 

Russel C. Smith, Antioch. 

Leonard M. Sprinkle, Logansport, Ind. 

Gilbert Steffen, Kenosha, Wise. 

Mark W. Stephens, Valparaiso, Ind. 

Gordon D. Sumner, Ottumwa, la. 

Arthur A. Swanson, Belvidere. 

Harry C. Sweger, LaSalle. 

Bernard C. Szold, Valparaiso, Ind. 

Donald H. Taylor, Hammond, Ind. 

Victor D. Thomas, Rockford. 

Leslie F. Timoney, Marengo. 

Ray C. Tracy, Davenport, la. 

Frank Unger, Aurora. 

George L. Watson, Antioch. 

David P. Wertheimer, Chicago. 

William J. Wildeman (Soph.) Madi- 
son, Wise. 

William W. Wilkinson, Freeport. 

Frank L. Wilson, Valparaiso, Ind. 

Clarence C. Winning, Freeport. 

George E. Winther, Aurora. 

John H. Wood, Canton. 

Henry T. Young, Elgin. 

Harry W. Younger, Hammond, Ind. 

Harold W. Zuver, Hammond, Ind. 

Margaret Bridgman spent Monday 
evening at Lois Durand Hall, the 
guest of Sigma Tau. She is teach- 
ing in La Grange, being at home on 
account of the Influenza. 



THE STENTOR 



Jen and Mary 

"Hello Jen." 

"Hello Mary." 

"Gladtoseeyou." 

"Glad to be here — know any gos- 
sip?" 

"Oh! girlie — come around the cor- 
ner — now doncha tell!" 

Any female frosh wishing to join 
a sniping party report at 11:59 p. m. 
next Thursday evening on the corner 
of Sheridan road and Deerpath Ave- 
nue. Please be prompt. 

Speaking of frosh — have you heard 
of the canoeing parties they are plan- 
ning for next spring in the ravine be- 
hind the hall? Green is the leading 
color for canoes this season. 

Did you get your watch turned 
back last Saturday night — or were 
you up for breakfast at seven? 

A new queen is raging at Lois 
Dorm — she "don't us no slang nor 
nothin'," — she is devoted to duty — 
and boys, she's a whiz! One of those 
ravishing brunettes — (doncha) know 
— oh! those pearly teeth. 

Hist! Our own meler drammer! 
Prelude — Many romantic walks on 
the rheumatic shores of Lake Mich- 
igan. 

Act I. Frat pin changes hands. 
Act II. Our hero and heroine take 

a trip — visit the family. 
Act III. Home economics! and War 

Issues! 

The S. A. T. C. has nothing on us — 
we have a bugler too, why not play 
the "Star Spangled Banner" while 
you are about it? We'll say she's 
some bungler! 

Did you bring your Bible back with 
you this time, Beth? We were cer- 
tainly scandalized to hear that you 
forgot it before! 

We thot it was about time for a 
dinner party. Isn't it lucky that 
Sunday isn't soup and spaghetti day? 

After much cogitation our contrib 
— A. S. — has rendered the following: 

I stood upon a mountain, 
And gazed down on the plain: 
I saw a lot of green stuff, 
Which looked like waving grain. 

I took another look at it 
And thought it might be grass 
But, goodness! to my horror — 
It was the freshman class. 

UghhhM! those grades!! "The Gob- 
lins '11 git you if you don't watch 
out." 



Our Own Noveline 

Under the Yellow Flag 

(Complete in this issue) 

It was a beautiful day in October. 
The sun was shining. The birds 
were singing. All nature smiled. 
The gorgeous, exquisitely tinted, au- 
tumn leaves were falling down from 
the noble oaks what stood guarding 
the grand old college at Lake Forest. 

Down a winding path came our 
heroine. She seemed to be riding 
the gentle zephyrs so lightly did she 
bound o'er the earth. Suddenly she 
stopped and peered ahead. Then she 
danced onward — more gayly than be- 
fore. 

Coming down the walk toward her 
was a man — a tall dark handsome 
man with a Charlie Chaplin mustache 
and a brilliant green sweater. Grace- 
fully he swaggered onward never no- 
ticing our dainty heroine. 

"He sees me not," quoth our hero- 
in, "but never mind — yet a few min- 
utes . and he shall know me well." 
Then softly she sighed a dainty sigh 
and stepped up beside him. She 
touched his hand — she snuggled 
against his shoulder. Very, very, 
gently, then she touched his cheek. 

He stopped and looked about him. 
Abashed he bowed his curly head. 
Then he yielded to her gentle plead- 
ings and tenderly leaned toward her. 
"Cach-o-o-o-o!" he quoth "Ca-cho-o- 
o! It's the vampire Flu — I knew 
she'd get me. Cach-ooooooooo! ! !" 



Rebecca Armstrong entertained 
Gwendolyn Giltner and Isabella 
Childs from Ottumwa. 



News from 
Felix Beauchamp 

The following extracts are from a 
letter written by Lieutenant Felix 
Beauchamp, ex 'IS, to his parents 
from a German prison camp where 
he has been since his plane fell on 
the wrong side of the lines in France. 

"Hope you haven't been worrying 
about my disappearance. This is the 
first chance I've had of writing you. 
Am quite all right and enjoying life 
as well as a prisoner could, though 
its very hard to resign oneself to 
idleness after having such a splen- 
did time in the air. It was a real 
exciting time, but I guess there were 
too many German airmen for my 
short experience. There were holes 
in almost everything but myself. I 
landed qufite a few milep on the 
wrong side of the lines. I was taken 
immediately by the infantry and then 
by some airmen who made me spend 
the night at their aerodrome and 
were real good sports and quite con- 
cealed their satisfaction over having 
shot me down. 

"Several of our aviators have had 
their machines shot down without 
being killed so I have all kinds of 
company and we're living under quite 
pleasant conditions. Don't worry 
about me, for I'm very well and will 
see you all after the war." 

A letter from Major V. A. H. Rob- 
ison, received at the same time as 
the above, states that Lieutenant 
Beauchamp's machine had been 
found, indicating that since his fall 
the Germans had been driven back 
beyond the point where he was cap- 
tured. 



Subscribe for 

The Stentor 

The Live College Paper 



Subscription price $2 
($1 to men in service) 



THE STENTOR 



Faculty News 

Many of the alumni already know 
that Professor Halsey had a partial 
stroke of paralysis early in August 
and is at present "out of commis- 
sion". No doubt his illness was 
brought on by his unremitting effort 
in the last year or two in imparting 
through public addresses his own 
wide and accurate knowledge and 
something of his enthusiasm to many 
and widely scattered audiences. His 
services, freely given, were in great 
demand; at the Great Lakes Station, 
for example, he had spoken weekly to 
large audiences for a long time. It 
is a matter of great regret that he 
could not have gone on in the same 
fashion, with the inspiration of the 
hopeful events of recent months. One 
can readily imagine how greatly he 
would have been "in his element" in 
giving a course like that on "War 
Issues and Aims" in the S.A.T.C. 
For the last month or more, Dr. Hal- 
sey has been at the North Shore Sani- 
tarium at Winnetka, removing there 
from Alice Home when the influenza 
was at its height here. For a long 
time his improvement was hardly ap- 
preciable, but we are glad to say that 
there has been a marked turn for the 
better in the last fortnight; his phy- 
sician expresses himself as quite 
hopeful about him. He expresses, in 
this indirect way, his appreciation of 
a number of letters received from 
alumni, and we need hardly suggest 
that he should hear from others also. 

Professor and Mrs. Burnap are still 
at their summer camp near Sutton's 
Bay, Mich., where they have found 
October delightful with its Autumn 
hues and abundance, though the ther- 
mometer often gets down to a crisp 
30 degrees in the morning. Their 
present plan is to spend a short time 
here in November and to winter in 
California. 

Professor St. John, professor of 
Physics for 1917-18, resigned in Aug- 
ust to accept a position in the experi- 
mental department of a carbon com- 
pany in Cleveland. 

Charles C. Mather, late instructor 
in English and able exponent and pro- 
moter of the histrionic art, is waiting 
his turn at the camp aeroplane at 
Camp Dick, Dallas, Texas, and in his 
somewhat enforced leisure, project- 
ing a new dramatic "thriller". 

Margarite Martin visited her sister 
Josephine. 

Margaret Horton entertained her 
mother at Lois Durand Hall on 
Tuesday. 

Beth Thayer spent the week-end 
at her home in Chicago. 



National Service 

Following are some items which 
have come in during the summer 
from those in some form of National 
Service. The Commencement Sten- 
tor of last June contained a list of 
those engaged so far as we could 
gather it up to that time. Word has 
come from a good many, both in the 
United States and abroad, of the in- 
terest they had in that list. We wish 
it might be expanded and corrected, 
but this "is only possible through the 
f-ooperation of all concerned. No 
doubt there are constantly many 
changes both in ranking and in lo- 
cation and other names should have 
been added to the list if we had had 
the information about them. We 
have still a number of copies of that 
issue of the Stentor and they will be 
sent on request to any who ask for 
them. 



With the installation here of the 
S. A. T. C, there is new reason for 
building up and verifying that list 
and in a few months it may be much 
augmented through the names of 
graduates from the S. A. T. C. Any 
information from any reader con- 
cerning those who are in service in 
any capacity will be gratefully re- 
ceived. 



Roll of Honor 

Previously reported: 

1917. Corp. Earl C. Adams, 13Sth 
Infantry. Died at Fort Sill, Dec. 30, 
1917. 

1914. Earl D. Milroy, B. A. Marine. 
Died at Camp Quantico, February, 
1918. 

1918. Sergt. Walter Willert. Died 
about Aug. 1 of wounds received in 
the second Marne battle. 

189 3. Rev. John A. Linn, reported 
killed by shell fire Oct. 8, has been in 
Y. M. C. A. service in France for six 
months or more, and evidently did 
not shrink from duty which took him 
near the front. After graduation 
here, Mr. Linn studied for the Epis- 
copal ministry, and later was an ac- 
tive clergyman of that church until 
about 1912. Subsequently, he taught 
in the Howe School, Indiana, and at 
the time he entered national service 
was a master in the Trinity School, 
New York City. 

He was one of the ablest men in- 
tellectually in a class whose average 
was high, and active in all college 
enterprises, one of the outstanding 



men of his time here. His father, 
Rev. John M. Linn, lives in Chicago 
at 7731 N. Marshfield Ave. Profes- 
sor J. W. Linn of Chicago University 
is a brother and Miss Jane Addams of 
Hull House is his aunt. 

1917. First Lieutenant Edward Orr, 
accidentally killed in France on Sept. 
14, was a student here in 1913-14, 
well liked among the men and a mem- 
ber of the basket-ball team. He 
transferred to Chicago U., where he 
was graduated in 1917. As to his 
service, the best comment is the ci- 
tation which follows in connection 
with the award to him of the Distin- 
guished Service Cross by the Presi- 
dent on recommendation of General 
Pershing. 

"First Lieut. Edward Orr, Deceas- 
ed, pilot, U. S. A. S., Twelfth aero 
squadron, for extraordinary heroism 
in the Toul sector, France, Aug. 28, 

1918. Lieut. Orr, flying with Lieut. 
Phil A. Henderson, infantry observer, 
on an unprotected reconnaissance 
mission, encountered a patrol of eight 
enemy pursuit planes near the Amer- 
ican balloon line. The patrol was 
sighted just as one of them dived on 
the balloon with the intention 
of destroying it. Without hesitat- 
ing, Lieut. Orr attacked this plane 
and followed it to within fifty meters, 
firing his single front gun against the 
double guns with which the German 
plane was equipped. In the mean- 
time, Lieut. Henderson engaged the 
other eight planes, which attacked 
from the rear. After a violent com- 
bat all of the enemy planes were 
driven off. An Sept. 14, Lieut. Orr 
was accidentally killed. Next of kin, 
E. K. Orr, father, 5331 Woodlawn 
Avenue, Chicago, 111." 

1892. Rev. Murdoch McLeod has 
just closed a four-months service as 
pastor at Camp Lewis, Washington. 

1905. W. H. Ferguson has been 
commissioned as first Lieutenant of 
the Chemical Warfare Service, Sta- 
tioned at Edgewood Arsenal, Balti- 
more, Md. His address is 311 West 
Monument St., Baltimore. 

1906. Reverend Carroll D. Erskine 
who joined the Y. M. C. A. forces last 
spring has received an appointment 
as chaplain and assigned to Group 1, 
comprising the 1st and 2nd Battalion, 
175th Depot Brigade, Camp Travis, 
San Antonio, Texas. 

1909. William B. Marquis who was 
in Lake Forest for a short time on - 
September 2 5th, has had work in 
connection with the cantonments all 
over the country since he took up 
that service at Washington last Feb- 
ruary. 



THE STENTOR 



1909. Jacob Schwartz has received 
an ensign's commission at the Pel- 
ham Bay School, and is now awaiting 
orders. 

1910. Captain Robert R. Ralston 
has been made a Major. 

1911. Lieut. Charles R. Goold, Air- 
craft Armament Section, A. P. O. 702, 
A. E. F. France. 

1911. Stewart D. Marquis is under 
detail for special work along chemical 
lines in the Rockefeller Institute at 
New York. 

1912. W. H. Marbaeh is chaplain of 
the 103rd Battalion, 160th Depot 
Brigade, Camp Pike, Ark. 

1913. Lewis E. Hoult enlisted in the 
aviation service June 10th and was 
sent to the Rahe Army School, Kan- 
sas City, Mo. 

1913. A card dated September 4th 
from Charles S. Jackson stated that 
he was being sent to Camp Upton as 
a member of one of several groups 
to fill in an overseas division. Mail 
addressed to Headquarters, Camp 
Group 1, M. T. O. Camp Hancock, 
Augusta, Ga., will be forwarded to 
him. 

1913-14-18. Carlton H. Casjens, En- 
sign IT. S. N., has just gone to Eng- 
land for assignment to duty. Ad- 
dress Municipal Ferry Terminal, 
South & Whitehall Sts., N. Y. C. 
Peter Ray Casjens, Private, Hdqts. 
Co., 337th Field Artillery, 88th Div., 
A. E. F. France. Lieut. Floyd M. 
Casjens, 50th M. G. Battalion, Camp 
Beauregard, La. 

1914. Charles E. Long: Sixth Reg- 
ulars Sanitary Squad No. 2, Camp 
Hospital 64, Am. P. O. 730, A. E. F. 
France. 

1914. Benjamin Schwartz is in the 
Army Medical Service with rank of 
lieutenant. 

1915. Ernest Krueger on a recent 
furlough spent some time on the 
campus. On leaving the Brooklyr. 
National League Club in July, he en- 
listed in the Marine Corps, and his 
present address is U. S. Ship Kajer- 
una, S. P. 3S9 5th Naval Div., Nor- 
folk, Va. He is applying, however, 
for tranfer to naval aviation. 

1915. Ernest B. Moffet is a private 
in the ordnance department. Ad- 
dress, Hanlon Field, Chemical War- 
fare Service A. P. O. 706, A. E. F. 
He reports with date of Sept. 29 that 
he has had seven months of interest- 
ing work "over there", but can't 
seem "to get up to the front." 
1915. The correct address of Assis- 
tant Paymaster S. A. Bishop, is Navy 
Allotment Office, Corcoran Court, 
17th St. and New York Ave., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

1915. Second Lieutenant E. L. Van 
Sickle, A. G. D. N. A. is overseas and 



can be addressed c/o Headquarters 1st 
Army, American Expeditionary Forc- 
es. In a letter dated August 21st, he 
says that he has seen some little ac- 
tion with his old division. Of Lake 
Forest men he has only seen Orr, 
'16, First Lieutenant in the Flying 
Corps, now deceased. 
1916. We understand on good au- 
thority that Lieut. Melville Gray has 
been recommended for a captaincy. 
Applause on the campus! His ad- 
dress is Battery 17, A. P. O. 710, 
A. E. F. France. 

1916. Elrick B. Davis omitted from 
June list. Sept. 1 he was a second 
Lieut, at Camp Devens, Mass. 

1916. Ralph E. Krueger, Battery C, 
72nd Artillery, C. A. C, A. E. F. 
France. 

1917. Ralph E. Johnson of Rock- 
ford is a private in the Headquarters 
Company, 3 5th Infantry, Nogales, 
Ariz. This address was dated June 
1st, 1918. . 

1917. Floyd Mayne after two 
months recent service on the Pontiac, 
is now at the Municipal Pier Officers' 
Material School and on the way to 
Pelham Bay and, we hope, a commis- 
sion. 

1918. Edwin L. Gilroy was gradu- 
ated from Pelham Bay, September 9th 
and had ten days furlough at his 
home in Lake Forest. He has now 
gone to New York for ensign service 
in the Merchant Marine. His ad- 
dress is U.S.S. Wachusettes, c/o Post- 
master, N.Y.C. 

19 IS. Samuel Isa's address Septem- 
ber 1st was No. 155503, "C" Com- 
pany, 5th Battalion, 3rd Camp R.A. 
M.C., Blackpool, England. 

1918. H. H. Leiter in U. S. Marines. 
The cipher for his address, as he him- 
self writes it, is N.C.O. X School, 
Paris Island, S. C. 

1919. We were misinformed in stat- 
ing in the June Stentor that W. G. 
Young had been honorably dis- 
charged. On Aug. 17, he was al- 
ready weaving a service stripe in 
France, and his division had "met 
the Hun where their assaults were 
strongest." At that date the division 
was just returning to rest camp "af- 
ter driving some of the best German 
divisions over thirty kilometers." His 
address, Corporal W. G. Young, Bat- 
tery C, F. A. 149, A.P.O. 715, Am. 
Ex. Force, France. 

1920. Harold Hickey, Sergeant 17th 
Infantry N.G. Co. (Davis) 

1920. H. L. Paget, Co. D., L.M.M. 
R.S. Unite 305, Camp Jesup, Atlanta, 
Ga. 

1920. Wilford H. Taylor is a ser- 
geant in the Medical Corps stationed 
at the Detachment Hospital, Valpar- 
aiso, Ind., and says he feels at least 



100% better with khaki on than in 
civilian clothes. 



1888. Rev. John J. Boggs has re- 
turned from his station in China on 
account of a breakdown in health. 
In September he went to Rollins Col- 
lege, Winter Park, Florida, where 
Calvin H. French of the same class 
is president, as professor of Classics. 



Music School Notes 

Organization 

On October the 14th the new girls 
of the School of Music organized and 
elected Ruth Randolph president and 
Hannah Friedman vice-president and 
secretary. 

The same day the old girls organ- 
ized and chose as president Dorothy 
Antrine and Alma Boggis as vice- 
president and secretary. 

The Music School extends its 
heartiest appreciation to the S. A. T. 
C. band for the music it has rendered 
in the mess hall. 



Hallowe'en Party 

The Hallowe'en spirit is so preva- 
lent that the Music School could not 
resist it; so on Saturday evening, 
October the 2 6th a Hallowe'en party 
was given in North Hall. 

The faculty first invited their 
guests to the director's studio, where 
we shook hands with a clammy hand 
and had all sorts of pranks played 
on us. 

Immediately following this, there 
were more horrors invented by the 
new girls. A bewitching fortune 
teller's boflth attracted many while 
others bobbed for apples. After this 
we were mysteriously led into a very 
dark room filled with "spooks" and 
ghostly noises. 

Later, all seated in a circle around 
a witch's fire, we watched the ghast- 
ly expressions appear on each other's 
faces and death will never have ter- 
rors for us again. 

This ended the horrors and all 
gathered in the spacious living room 
where Vassar chocolate, cakes, candy 
and music were served. 



Pep 

Yes, we've got it and loads more 
Besides a lot we keep in store; 
From liveliness its just one step — 
Can't you guess it? Why it's Pep. 

Alma Boggis, 
Ruth Randolph, 

Editors. 



THE STENTOR 



(On Damning The 
Kaiser) 

WHEN you have to Hooverize 
on all the things you like, 
when you have to study 
every night and get up in the 
morning hours before you used 
to — what do you do? Damn the 
kaiser! When the bugle blows un- 
expectedly and you have to say good- 
bye to your girl on the run — do you 
"d the k"? When the influenza 
trails you like a bill collector — do you 
gargle desperately — "damn the kai- 
ser"? Well, may be you don't but 
the rest of us do. 

It happens in the best regulated 
dorms — this damning — it is being 
done in our best circles, in fact it is 
almost universally popular. There is 
no wonder either, the phrase is be- 
coming in almost any situation if pro- 
perty accented. Such an indulgence 
gives a certain complacent feeling — 
you have not only eased your feel- 
ings, but it seems somehow, as tho 
you had done "old Bill" a personal 
injury — given him a little side thrust 
that would help in laying him out. 
It doesn't exactly sweeten your coffee 
but it gives you more time to stir it 
and keeps the mind off of the ter- 
rible minuteness of the lump. So we 
all shrug our shoulders and wish the 
kaiser a bad end. 

Keep it up — swat the kaiser, but 
swat him in the ribs! It might hurt 
his feelings a trifle, if he had any 
feelings, to know that millions of peo- 
ple were wishing him ill but per- 
sonally we should rather hit him a 
real blow. Try damning him by sav- 
ing sugar, fats, and wheat, by drill- 
ing to be efficient officers, by knitting 
eternally and rolling accurate band- 
ages. Get the very most t>ut of your 
time and energy now in order to be 
prepared for the final blow. It is 
the only way to send your "damns" 
to Germany! 



Changes of Address 

1899. Reverend F. A. Crandall, R. 
F. D. No. 2, Canaseraga, N. Y. 

1904. Margery L. Hutchinson, 1621 
Fremont Ave., N., Minneapolis, Minn. 

1905. N. Tracy Yeomans, after Oct- 
ober first, will be at 722 W. Bitter- 
sweet Place, Chicago. 

1915. Fred Dunsmore is now at 
Echo, Pa. 



cupied as a teacher and minister until 
1897, when he became engaged in 
msiness in Chicago. 



Obituary Notices 



1916. Dean Edgerton is now an at- 
torney at Law in Blythe, Calif. Much 
to his regret, he cannot get by the 
doctors and get into military service. 

1916. Clarence A. Mahon of Crow- 
ley, Colorado, stopped off in Lake 
Forest the other day to look things 
over. He is now general manager of 
the Avondale Alfalfa Milling Co., a 
$250,000 corporation. 

1920. Miss Adeline Bertling has 
transferred from Northwestern to 
Wisconsin University, where she is 
now a Junior. 



1911. Died at Greencastle, Ind., Oct. 
19, of influenza, Mrs. Esther Good- 
man Rothberg. Her father also, Max 
Goodman of Monticello, died of the 
same disease a day or two later. 
Mrs. Rothberg was known in college 
for her versatility and ability. She 
was a member of her class Forester 
Board, Junior vice-president of her 
class, a leading voice on the women's 
Glee Club, and on the Lois Hall house 
committee. She was a member of 
the Theta Psi Sorority. After gradu- 
ation, she taught for some time in 
Lafayette, and in 1916, was married 
to Jack Rothberg, a graduate of Pur- 
due. 

1915. Died at Lexington, Kentucky, 
on Oct. 20, of pneumonia, William T. 
Ross. Mr. Ross had been in the em- 
ploy of the Atkins Saw Co. of In- 
dianapolis, since his graduation, as a 
traveling salesman. At the time of 
his death the company could get no 
trace of any kin, but had his body 
sent back to Indianapolis, arranged 
for funeral services at an undertak- 
er's rooms, and provided a suitable 
lot for his burial. His fraternity will 
no doubt interest itself in the matter, 
and special effort will be made to lo- 
cate a married sister whose address 
is now unknown. While in college, 
Ross was prominent in many lines of 
tudent activity, keeping at the same 
time a good record in scholarship. 
He was on the football team all four 
years, usually playing half-back, was 
class president in his Junior year, on 
Glee Club and class Forester Board, 
and in his Senior year, president of 
the Athletic Board of Control. 

Died suddenly in Chicago on June 
6th, Rev. Albert McCalla, Ph. D., 
professor of Mathematics 18S6-SS, 
aged 72. Mr. McCalla was graduated 
at Monmouth in 1867 and at Union 
Seminary in 1870. After a short 
pastorale at Emporia, Kansas, he was 
for eleven years professor in Parsons 
College, Iowa, before coming to Lake 
Forest. After leaving here he was oc- 



Two on a Tour 

"A year ago I was placed in Class 
V by the Libertyville Draft Board for 
physical reasons of which I was never 
fully informed. As you probably 
know, I was married to Mary Roe in 
April and we came west via "Ford." 
Enroute I have been visiting colleges 
and universities, as I have for the 
past two years, for The Century Co. 
of New York. To date we have trav- 
eled about 6500 miles and had a de- 
lightful trip. We spent a week in 
Yellowstone National Park and have 
visited almost all corners of Wash- 
ington and Oregon since arriving in 
the Pacific states some two months 
ago. For the most part we have 
camped. Our "Fliver" has a com- 
plete camping equipment, bed. tent, 
diner, gas stove, etc., and we have 
become as much attached to our 
home on wheels as we could to any 
little bungalow anywhere. Speak- 
ing of Fords, we found a new name 
for ours, especially while crossing 
the mountains — O-phelia Bumps, and 
I can assure you that in some cases 
we have called her with much feel- 
ing." 

J. Clarke Babcock, '16. 



1900. Richard H. Curtis is now 
financial editor of the Minneapolis, 
Minn., Journal. 

190 6. Fermar T. Black was recently 
married to Miss Marie Seamon Shaw 
of East Aurora, New York. Mr. and 
Mrs. Black will reside in Brookfield, 
Illinois. 

1909. A letter from Reverend Henry 
White from Chiengmai, Siani, brings 
the news that he and Mrs. White may 
return permanently to this country 
on account of the health of their lit- 
tle daughter who has been with 
friends at Syracuse, N. Y. 

1910. Married at Joliet, 111., August 
24th, Margaret Louise Duncan and 
Murray M. Baker. 

1912. Rev. R. Lincoln Long has 
been made acting pastor of the Col- 
lingwood Ave. Church, Toledo, O., 
during the absence of the regular pas- 
tor, now a chaplain-at-large. 
1916. Miss Bernice Ayres was mar- 
ried on Thursday, September 12th at 
her home in Leaf River, Illinois, to 
Mr. Harry H. Eisele. Mr. and Mrs. 
Eisele will live in Malcom, Iowa. 



THE STENTOR 



From the Half-way 
House 

You will, I am sure, pardon my 
stylus for our supply of ink is limited 
unless we get to the Y.M.C.A. and 
while we are in N.C.O. school our 
discipline is very rigid. Instead of 
bucking the line this fall, I have been 
trying to hit the Bull's Eye on the 
range and I made a score of 2 55 out 
of a possible 300 shots at 2, 3, 5, and 
600 yards, slow and rapid fire — this 
score classed me as an expert rifle- 
man. 

You might think it peculiar that 
I am at Paris Island, S.C., instead of 
2nd F.A. but many things can't be 
expounded or explained on paper, 
though many thing could be told 
you of much interest in person. In 
your line of work, many of the hap- 
penings here would interest you very 
much. 

At 10.00 all hit the bunks for a 
peaceful sleep, only to be much dis- 
turbed by the sergeant with a lady- 
canic eruption "Hit the Deck" — "Roll 
out" — "Up with you", and there is 
some rush. All bunks are torn down, 
carried out, and each man must shave 
and shine his shoes in 15 minutes 
and be at Roll Call. If the unlucky 
guy is found out he is called up to 
the Major — for a deck court-mar- 
tial. We class absence from Roll call 
identical to A.W.O.L. 

Today I spent most of the day 
cleaning my rifle and mess kit, also 
writing to my sweetheart, Mother and 



you. Next to the aforesaid my rifle 
is my best friend for although it is 
cold steel, it seems human to me. I 
can nearly make it do as I wish. I 
feel just as much at ease with it now 
as I used to with a pigskin beneath 
my feeble arms. 

Oh, yes, I overshot. We are taught 
man to man combat and I could show 
you in just a few minutes how to 
break a man's neck, punch his eyes 
out and kick him in the kidneys in 
hree movements. 

Kindly remember me to all the 
faculty and students, not forgetting 
Heine Dorn and his private secretary 
— Mack. 

Herschel H. Leiter, 'IS. 

Sept. 20. Paris Island, S. C. 

U. S. Marines, N.C.O. , X School. 



Y. W. C. A. Events 

The Y. W. C. A. of Lois Durand 
Hall has been unusually active this 
year. The first event was the Recog- 
nition Service on October 3rd. The 
ceremony was simple but most im- 
pressive. Lydia Sprecher, the presi- 
dent of the College Y. W. C. A. con- 
ducted the short devotional services, 
after which the new members were 
received. 

On the following Friday evening 
a Fire Side spread was given in Lois 
Durand Hall, in honor of the new 
members. Ice cream and cookies 
were freely circulated and the Fresh- 
men were given their first taste of a 
genuine Lois Durand Hall spread. 



Although the affair was not as elab- 
orate as the Y. W. progressive spreads 
usually have been, every one seemed 
to understand that Mr. Hoover was 
to blame, and food conservation in 
this case did not mean fun conser- 
vation. 

On October 10th and 11th, Miss 
Hazlett, the representative of the 
Student "Volunteer movement, visited 
us. Thursday evening she spoke 
most helpfully to the girls on the ef- 
fect of the war on the women of dif- 
ferent lands, and of our opportunity 
to make this attitude continue after 
the war is over. On Friday evening 
a Beach Party was given in honor of 
Miss Hazlett. Lake Forest Beach 
parties are never dull, but an Oc- 
tober drizzle kindly consented to re- 
move all dryness that might have at- 
tended this affair. The weinies, 
rolls, potato salad, coffee, apples and 
marshmallows were thoroughly en- 
joyed and a hugh bonfire kept every 
one dry and warm. 

Last Thursday the college women 
were promised a real treat. Through 
the efforts of Miss Hamilton, Mrs. Ira 
Couch Wood kindly consented to ad- 
dress our regular weekly meeting. 
Mrs. Wood is director of the Child 
Welfare Work of the Women's Com- 
mittee of the Council of National De- 
fense. Unfortunately, illness pre- 
vented Mrs. Wood from coming. We 
hope, however, to have the privilege 
of hearing her soon. Miss Hamilton 
spoke to the girls Thursday evening 
and her inspiring words were greatly 
appreciated. 



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THE STENTOR 



From the French 
Front 

Since I last wrote I have been busy 
passing from the stage of a raw re- 
cruit to that of a seasoned veteran. 
I have at least smelled gunpowder, 
dodged a few "Minnies" and ducked 
a number of whiz-bangs, to say noth- 
ing of disguising my comely counten- 
ance with said life-saving gas mask 
which is much better than I should 
have done had I remained a Camp 
Lee Veteran. 

I've discovered that merely having 
been in France means nothing to a 
man who has been "on the boards" 
or "over the bags". A week ago, 
when we came out last time, we came 
south to the American Sector. We 
hiked along past a Y.M.C.A.and Corps 
School H.Q. and passed a regiment of 
North Dakota National Guard, who 
have been over here since January 
doing nothing but guard duty, living 
in fine barracks, bathing at least once 
a week and having all of the comforts 
of home. They had just gotten their 
service stripes and felt pretty cockey 
Our men were carrying trench 
equipment — among other things, a 
petrol-tin per squad which is used 
for carrying water in the trenches. 
I'll admit that they are strange look- 
ing things if you don't know what 
they are for. These N.G's saw them 
and started kidding our men about 
them with such remarks as "Look at 
the milk-can", "Wait till you get 
your stripe and you'll get along with- 
out the extras", "What are they for?" 
This last remark was enough for an 
Irishman near me who said "Lord, 
when they finally get you weaned 
from milk to water and let you get 
away from the fire-place, you'll find 
out - '. 

We're down here resting up now, 
but I hope they let us into it down 
here. I know that the Americans 
can do as good as the British (who 
we were with) did up north, and 
they are some soldiers too. Of course 
we were with the best division in the 
British Army, but they were soldiers, 
every one of them. 

I know that this letter is rambling 
along without much sense or connec- 
tion, but everytime I start to tell you 
something, censorship interferes. I 
have a fine Boche pistol to show you 
some day which I got from a German 
Officer up north. 

Chester R. Davis, '18. 
Se Pt- 1 (1st Lieut.) 



Announcement was received of the 
marriage of Dorothy Lusk, ex '19, to 
Lieutenant Coulter M. Montgomery, 
on September 12, in Chicago. 

Mrs. Clarence Wetzel, formerly 
Gertrude Adkisson, ex '19, of New 
Haven, Connecticut, visited Sigma Tau 
last week-end. 

Sarah Moore spent the week-end 
it her home in Aurora. 

Sigma Tau entertained Jessie Carr 
md Hazel Clarke over the week-end. 

Mildred Gerlach entertained Kath- 
arine Horton at her home in Chicago. 

Marjorie Graves from Chicago was 
the guest of Helen Barnthouse. 

Katherine Horton entertained her 
nother a week ago. 

Ruth Talcot visited Sigma Tau 
over the week-end of October 12th. 

Company "A" has exhibited a 
great tendency to entertain. Their 



first social activity was a dance given 
in Durand Art Institute. The music 
was exceptionally good and in every 
way the dance was a most enjoyable 
affair. Much credit is due to Com- 
pany "A" for a very pleasant and 
peppy evening. 

The following week-end they en- 
tertained at a beach party. All of 
the guests reported delicious food and 
a very good time in every way. 

Thrift stamps are sold in Lois 
Durand Hall every Tuesday and 
Thursday immediately after lunch- 
eon. For the men they are on sale 
at the College Book Store on Wed- 
nesday afternoons from 4-<>o till 
4:45. 



/. B. Veselsfcy 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



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From an English 
Training Camp 

( The writer of the following letter is 
an Arab, a native of Bagdad, gradu- 
ated in June last. Rejoicing with his 
family in their emancipation from 
Turkish rule, he felt himself moved 
to enlist with the English.) 

"I am writing you these few lines 
to let you know of my whereabouts. 
I was in Camp in Windsor, Nova 
Scotia, till June 10th, then went to 
York Redoulet near Halifax, to wait 
for a chance to come over. I was as- 
signed to the K.A.M.C. I came here 
to Camp and after getting settled, I 
was given ten days furlough which I 
spent in London. I have been get- 
ting my training here all the time. 
The training consists of physical 
drills, company drills, bandaging, lec- 
tures on Sanitation, instructions in 
Physiology, etc. After two weeks we 
will go through our anti-gas training. 
I am sort of indifferent to being a 
soldier. I neither like it or dislike 
it. After I am done with my train- 
ing here I shall be given six days 
furlough, and then will either be sta- 
tioned at home or sent for foreign 
service. Going to Church is a mat- 
ter of compulsion in the British Army. 
The soldiers must go to their respec- 
tive denominations. If they do not, 
they will be put to fatigue work on 
Sundays. All the new men here must 
have army hair-cut or something like 
it, i.e., a very short hair-cut which 
makes one look like a convict. I had 
a hair-cut once here on Friday even- 
ing; the next day, on inspection the 
major thought it was rather long, so 
in order to avoid conflict, I went and 
put my head voluntarily for the first 



time in the hands of the army barber. 
I was sorry to see my long curly 
hair falling off so unceremoniously. 
That was my first and last time that 
I went to the Army barber. I looked 
so much like a German. Never again! 
I am coming gradually to learn the 
English accent. I notice that some 
add "H' J to words beginning with a 
vowel, and some omit to pronounce 
an "H" when it is at the beginning 
of the word. Some say "Heven and 
Hodd" for even and odd, and some 
say "Uns" for "Huns". I am longing 
to be in America again. There is no 
other country in the world that could 
be compared to the U. S. 

"Please remember me to all the 
professors and students. I would 
very much like to hear from you. 

Respectfully yours, 
Sept. 1, 1918. Samuel E. Isa, '18. 
No. 1555 3, C Company, 5th Battal- 
ion, 3rd Camp R.A.M.C, Blackpool, 
England. 



C. G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



g"TT $65.00 takes my $250.00 

^J size phonograph, one diamond, 
-U one sapphire point needle, and 200 
steel needles and records. All new- 
used two weeks. Act quick. 317 Greenleaf 
Ave., Wilmette. 

200 ft. from Linden Sta. Mil. Elec. 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

DEALER IN 
Gents ' Furnishings 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL, 



FRANK BULOW 

Barber 

Under Jensen's Shoe Store 
RAILROAD TICKETS 



The 
Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 1 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



C. T. Gunn Co. 
Grocers 



Agency Huyler's Candies 

Curtice Bros. Goods LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



fTT13T?T CIf"V Suceesaorto 

JVUr>r!/l_,aJV I Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



11 



lllllllll 



'laiiimi 



We take orders for 
Officers' Made- 
to-Measure 
Uniforms in 
O. D. Serge, 
Gabardines, 
and Whipcords 



Uniforms 



Shoes 



Hats 



CHARLES GLASS 

All Military Furnishings 

are lower in price here 
than anywhere else. 



Telephone 1216 HIGHWOOD, ILLINOIS 



■I 



lllilllllillllllllliiiillliiiiilil 



mi 



Dr. Nollen's Work 
in Italy 

Perhaps the best account of the 
Y.M.C.A. in Italy is that in the Sun- 
day edition of the N. Y. Times of 
July 21, by Ugo Ara, formerly a mem- 
ber of the Plonzaley Quartette. We 
quote a portion of this referring to 
one well-known here. 

"In January, 1918, the Y.M.C.A. 
reached Italy. Unknown, reserved, 
modest, its representatives began to 
wander from hospital to hospital, 
from barrack to barrack, offering not 
only their time, love, and science, but 
also, with the well-known generosity 
of the people of your country, a 
whole rain of games, musical instru- 
ments, books, sporting articles, maga- 
zines, phonographs, and everything 
which could recreate and amuse nor- 
mal and convalescing soldiers. 

"The beginning was a failure. The 
most extraordinary rumors circulated 
about them. Hidden political and re- 
ligious aims were attributed to them. 
Diffidence surrounded them. But, 
firm on the rock of their tranquil 
consciences, the members of the Y.M. 
C.A. continued their beneficial work. 

"Finally, when the military and 
civil authorities, as well as the entire 
population, began to realize what 
they were doing, with what a pure, 
clean spirit they were working, what 
a noble, human mission had taken 
them to our country, and what a 
sense of charity and love dictated 
each of their actions — when every- 
body at last became convinced that 
they really never meant to install 
Billy Sunday in the Vatican, turn the 



famous Maria del Fiore into a Chris- 
tian Science Church, all the sym- 
pathy toward those generous friends, 
and no manifestation of gratitude 
was deemed too great in order to 
prove to them that they were fully 
understood and appreciated. 

"It was my privilege, during four 
delightful months, to be attached as 
a Secretary and interpreter to the 
Italian Commission of the Y.M.C.A. 
presided over by Professor J. Nollen, 
former President of Lake Forest Uni- 
versity, and it was a source of in- 
expressible joy to see their work 
growing in success and importance up 
to the moment when the Minister of 
War, after a long, intimate inter- 
view with George Braden, Director of 
Physical Culture, recognizing official- 
ly the enormous utility of the society, 
spread through the whole of Italy a 
bulletin directed to the commanders 
of the army, ordering them to open 
wide the doors to the members of 
the Y.M.C.A. and facilitate their work 
in every possible manner. From that 
day Mr. Braden, a real apostle of 
health and happiness, whose devotion 
to our cause cannot be praised 
enough, began a triumphant tour 
through the country, organizing all 
kinds of races and sporting events, 
installing courses in physical culture 
at the military schools, convalescent 
homes, and rest camps, and intro- 
ducing his 'file method', which was 
soon adopted by all the military in- 
structors of the kingdom. Inmates 
of hospitals were cared for with spe- 
cial love and patience and cheered 
with all kinds of games, moving pic- 
ture shows, musical performances, 
and regular instruction in sports like 



volley ball, shuffleboard, quoits, etc. 

"The most touching and encour- 
aging letters of thanks and admir- 
ation poured in from everywhere. 

"'You have transformed my con- 
valescent home from a house of sor- 
row into an abode of joy,' wrote a 
well-known Colonel. Another direc- 
tor of a hospital thus expressed his 
gratitude : 'The austere atmosphere of 
my hospital has been transformed in- 
to an atmosphere of perfect serenity 
since your coming.' " 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 
1: 00 p. m. to 5:00 p. m. 

Dr.C.W. Young Dr. R.O. Smith 

Dentists 
200 Westminster East 

Lake Forest Illinois 



L. Greeoberg 

ELECTRIC SHOE REPAIRING 
SHOP 

55 Deerpath Ave. 
LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



12 



THE STENTOR 



llllllllllllllillll 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Always otters a liberal braining under experienced professors and excellent provision lor 
tke pkusical and social welfare of its students, in a beautiful environment. 

THE S. A. T. C. 

As is now well known, units of tke Students Armu Training Corps are maintained at 
manu colleges, to wkick are admitted graduates of kigk sckools or tkose offering an ecrui- 
valeut preparation. Suck men are inducted into tke Armu and given subsistance, pau of 
$30 per montk, and botk miktaru and collegiate instruction. Tke unit at Lake Forest is 
limited to about 200 men, and experience kas already proved tkat tke conditions kere 
are most favorable in tke wau of kousing, mess-kail, drill-ground and direction. As a num- 
ber of tke present quota are likelu to be promoted to an Officers' Training Camp in 
December, tkere will be places available for new-comers about January 1. 



m Under tke same government as tke College, but witk separate buildings and faculties are 

M LAKE FOREST ACADEMY 

A preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

M FERRY HALL 

H A school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

J THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

H With an independent organization, offering superior advantages. 

H For information about any department, address 

■ PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

|j LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, III. 



■Ill 



I(l3 



JENSEN &SUNDM ARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 
Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 
Tioketi 

no 



7 MARKET SQUARE 

Suits Called For and Delivered 
A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning and Pressing . . $1.50 

Pressing ... . . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



—J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m- 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Go . 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 






v * 



> 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, November 8, 1918. 



NUMBER 3. 



60 New Men 

The Government has raised our quota 
for the S. A. T. C. unit to 200 -men. 
Sixty new men will be added in all of 
which twenty have already arrived. 
Elgin has again contributed to our num- 
ber with twelve more men. 

Preparations are being made to pro- 
vide classes for the new-comers, in view 
of the fact that it would be impossible 
to enter classes with a six weeks' handi- 
cap. Mr. Sibley is offering a course in 
English, there will be another course in 
Mathematics, and those with previous 
work in Chemistry or Physics will have 
an opportunity to enter classes in these 
subjects. 

When the quota is filled, all the men 
in the Corps are to be divided in four 
platoons, arranged 1 according to height 
and distributed in the barracks accord- 
ingly. We expect the quota to be filled 
this week and doubtless will be able to 
print the full list in our next issue. 

Spooks on, the 
Campus 

A good old fashioned, as well as a 
very modern military Hallowe'en party, 
was given last Saturday night- in the 
Institute. 

All who were anxious for the good 
time which had been promised were as- 
sembled at Lois Durand Hall. After 
being formed into squads they were 
marched over to the party in true mili- 
tary style under the able leadership of 
our top sergeant. 

They were immediately led through 
the Chamber of Horrors- where they were 
introduced to ghosts, wild cats hanging 
from the ceiling, upturned: chairs ; and 
bed springs. 

After their recovery from this scene 
of horror the guests were again formed 
into squads and put through some real 
military drill. Then the squads were 
taken to the different stunts. 

The committee in charge had planned 
for a. much bigger party, but the men 
on the committee failed to do their part 
at the- last minute, and it looked as if 
there would be no party. But with the 
aid of Miss Hamilton; Dr. Wright and 
Lieutenant Thompson, who detailed men 
to help, the. girls were able to go ahead 
with their plans and give a very suc- 
cessful party. 



L. F. C. Parades 



Personnel of 

S. A. T. C. 
Military Staff 

The Lake Forest Unit of the S. A. 
T. C. has for over a month been operat- 
ing under the new system prescribed by 
the War Department. Much of the suc- 
cess of this unit is due to the able 
direction of the commanding officer of 
the ■ post, Lieutenant Frederick M. 
Thompson and his adjutants, Lieuten- 
ants Axelrod and Brown. 

Lieutenant Thompson's home is in 
Detroit. From the Detroit High School 
he went to St. John's Military Academy 
in Manlius, N. Y. After graduating 
from St. Johns he went to the Univer- 
sity of Michigan. At the end of his 
Sophomore year he entered the training 
camp at Fort Sheridan. After three 
months' intensive training he received 
his commission and was put in charge 
of the Army post here Lieutenant 
Thompson has been marked by his sup- 
eriors as a man of extraordinary ability. 
with great power of leadership. He 
stands as an example of the highest 
type of manhood. He has a reserved 
and modest disposition yet beneath this 
then is a commanding nature that you 
cannot fail to see. 

Lieutenant Brown, the Muskateer- in- 
structor, received his training at the 
North Dakota State College, Fort Sheri- 
dan, and Camp Perry, Ohio. Lieut. 
Axelrod hails from Ohio but received 
military training in the cadet corps of 
the University of Nebraska and also at 
Fort Sheridan. 

Lake Forest College, as well as the 
men in the S. A. T. C, may well feel 
fortunate and proud in having men of 
this type here. Not only has the influ- 
enza epidemic been most successfully 
handled, but a most delightful spirit 
exists between the military staff and 
the faculty on the one side and the 
staff and the student body on the other. 



Sarah Moore spent the week-end at 
her home in Aurora. 



News reached the campus Thurs- 
day noon that Germany had agreed 
to the Armistice. Wild excitement 
prevailed. Lunch was left untasted 
on the tables in Lois Hall. The girls 
rushed across the campus to an im- 
promptu mass meeting with the men 
and Musical School students. The 
band came forward willingly, leading 
the procession of girls, men, and 
faculty, all in military formation. 
The enthusiasm of the crowd grew as 
it neared the village where all the 
children of the Lake Forest Gram- 
mar Schools were assembled. After 
marching around Market Square the 
Parade halted while the band played 
the Star Spangled Banner. After a 
circuit of several blocks west of town, 
the students, who had by this time 
been joined by school children, fire 
department and many cars, turned 
east toward the Academy. On the 
way the Ferry Hall girls added ma- 
terially to the number and the 
Academy followed suit. After the 
Academy, Ferry Hall was visited 
where the paraders stopped long 
enough to give a number of 'peppy' 
yells and songs. By this time the 
original marchers were growing weary 
and fagged although their enthusiasm 
never lagged. On reaching Lois 
Hall the parade dispersed after more 
yells and songs, concluding with the 
Star Spangled Banner. 

With the consent of the powers- 
that-be arrangements were made for 
a Peace Dance in the evening at which 
Dr. and Mrs. Allee acted as chaper- 
ons. 



Scrap in Faculty 

Another scandal on the campus! 
Monday afternoon the entire campus was 
startled by the intelligence that the 
fighting son of Dr. Allee had exhibited 
his militaristic tendencies in a hand-to- 
hand combat with the daughter of Act- 
ing President H. W. Wright. The 
casualties resulting up to date consist 
of one black eye. Latest reports in- 
dicate that an armistice has been de- 
clared and. we trust that peace soon will 
be restored to the campus.. 



14 



THE STENTOR 



The "FLU 



•>•> 



Lake Forest College came out of the 
influenza epidemic most fortunately. 
This is probably the reason why little 
has been said about it and why few real- 
ize the extent of our good fortune. Out 
of twenty-five cases among the men, 
three of which developed into pneu- 
monia, and five cases in Lois Durand 
Hall, there were no fatalities. This is 
doubtless due to the excellent and 
prompt care afforded in every case. The 
president's house was- vacated at the 
most opportune moment and turned into 
a temporary hospital to which all the 
men patients were moved and efficiently 
cared for. The girls were removed on the 
first sign of illness to the Contagious 
Hospital south of town. The whole 
campus was under a strict quarantine 
for two weeks, which gave many the 
opportunity of exploring the grounds 
thoroughly, and partially quarantined 
for nearly a month after. In a word, 
nothing was left undone by faculty or 
officers to insure the safety and comfort 
of every student in the College. 

An Interesting Course of Lec- 
tures Promised 

Last Thursday afternoon a big treat 
was given to some of the girls of Lois 
Durand Hall in the form of an ex- 
tremely interesting illustrated lecture 
given by Professor Raymond. 

He has a course of splendid lectures 
which lie has kindly consented to give 
us. It is to be hoped that all of us 
will take advantage of this rare treat 
and hear as many of them as we can. 

There are about forty subjects in the 
course and each one is splendid and 
beautifully illustrated. Here are a few 
of the titles of his lectures, just to give 
you on idea of how really worth while 
and entertaining they are: "Paris and 
the Struggle for Democracy in France", 
"Belgium, a Burnt Offering to the God 
of War", "Historic Haunts in Sunny 
Italy", and "The Twelve World Pic- 
tures". 

Judge Ben B. Lindsey has said of 
Professor Raymond that he not only 
has a wonderful delivery, a magnifi- 
cent command of lauguage, and a 
charm of personality, but he thinks 
his lectures are just as entertaining 
as they are instructive, and just as in- 
structive as they are entertaining. 

As long as Professor Raymond has 
been kind enough to give these lectures 
and Dr. Wright has made it possible by 
securing the machine, surely the stu- 
dents of the College should attend. One 
will be given each Thursday afternoon 
at 2 o'clock and everyone is invited to 
hear them. It is an opportunity that 
no one can afford to miss. 



Lois Durand Hall at Home 

Last Monday afternoon, Lois Durand 
Hall was the scene of one of the most 
charming social events in the College 
this year. Miss Hamilton and the girls 
of Lois Durand Hall were hostesses to 
tlie women of the University faculty, the 
members of the Lake Forest School of 
Music and the day students of the 
College. 

Mrs. Henry W. Wright and Harriet 
Harris assisted Miss Hamilton in the 
receiving line and Margaret Horton, 
Ruth Stommel, Eloise Brown and Hazel 
Seguin served refreshments. The "Big 
Room" was very attractively furnished 
though not one bit too spacious for the 
gathering. Mrs. Raymond, the wife of 
tmr new professor, Dr. Jerome H. Ray- 
mond, was among the guests. 

It is hoped that this will prove only 
the first of many more such events to 
follow during the vear. 



Grades 



Mob scene following the posting of 
the monthly grades at Durand Art In- 
stitute — sounds rise above the crowd 
and one receives a general impression 
thus: 

Look out! Don't push! Lemme up, 
I wanta see what I got in psych — Say, 
look out there, I was looking at these 
grades first. Now, I'm not either push- 
ing. Say, listen, won't you move just a 
little, please? I wanta get a look at 
my psych grade and then I'll beat it — 
Oh, I should worry about my other 
works. I'll look at them after the jam. 
If I pulled thru this psych I oughta 
rate pretty good in everything else. 
Gee, I got a step nearer that time. 
Guess I'll wait a minute and see if 
someone doesn't get thru gazing on their 
little old 60 pretty soon. Say, you 
Frosh down there, shove off. You're 
not paying rent on that parking place 
there on the front row. Give another 
fella a chance. Come on, you can copy 
down those swell marks to send home 
to mother when there ain't so much 
competition. 

Oh! for a periscope! Hey there, you 
clown, move off my foot! Whaddye 
think this is, a dance? Say, Jim, while 
you're over there see what I drew in 
French. 73!!! ye gods! what ails that 
man. I thot I had him bluffed till I 
was dragging an A at the very lowest. 
You can't stake your month's dollar on 
what these profs, say, can you? 

Gosh! I'm getting anxious about that 
psych grade. Say now, I've waited long 
emit. Lemme down there. Aw, I'm not 
either gettin' huffey but come on, be a 
sport, give someone else a chance. 

'Atta boy. Now you're showin' the 
li'l ole spirit. Ha! Here I am ! 



Frat. Pledges 

Kappa Sigma announces the pledging 
of 

Joseph Black 

Vernal Brown 

Ralph Ekwall 

Albert Hale 

Elmer Johnson 

Clifford Krueger 

Walter Kinney 

Jesse Pratt 

Emil -Rauschert 

Halstead Schick 

Leon Noel 

Frank Wilson 

Howard Wood 

Owega Psi announces the pledging of 
the following men: 

Wilfred I. Hansen 

Ned H. McCormack 

Frederick Chamberlin 

Marcus Stevens 

Edward Sierk 

Roy F. Kappes 

Hugh J. Kotschi 

Howard Dickey 

Thomas W. Birmingham 

Phi Pi Epsilon announces the 
pledging of the following men: 

Paul M. Schlager 

Mark H. Hough 

Alvah M. Custin 

Don M. Rodgers 

Allen J. Coder 

Rolland R. Rippberger 

Willis B. Mallory 

Clarence C. Winning 

James Fitzpatrick 

Horace P. Emerson 

Leonard M. Sprinkle 

Gilbert H. Large 

The following men have been initiated 
into Digamma: 

Walter I. Brown. 

Merton J. Beck. 

Fred C. Bartol. 

Ralph Beddoes. 

Robert W. Framberg 

Elmer E. Giertz 

Leonard H. Huffer 

Raymond C. Hunn 

William W. Wilkinson 
and the following have been pledged: 

Norman G. Mueller 

Kenneth R. Mason 

David P. Wertheimer 

Rho Ganna will pledge all qualified 
students immediately after Thanksgiv- 



An odd sound is heard from the front 
row whether our hero has forced his 
way — a few seconds later a limp fig- 
ure is carried away. 

Which completes our little tragedy of 
tha psych grade — or any other grade, 
for that matter. And in conclusion I 
ask you, "What's the use?" I'll bite, 
what is it? Figure it out for yourself. 



THE STENTOR 



15 




MESS Hall by day, Study Hall by 
night, The Calvin Durand Com- 
mons presents a greatly changed 
appearance to the alumnus who revisits 
his Alma Mater. The changes there are 
representative of the changes which the 
military regime has brought about in 
all phases of college life. 

No more does the undisciplined frosh 
cut his morning classes and amble over 
to the Commons just in time for lunch. 
This year he is neither undisciplined 
nor absent from many of his meals. 
The bugle gets him up at six every morn- 
ing and, while he is not compelled to 
attend meals, he gets enough exercise 
to give him an appetite, and not often 
does he miss the mess call. No one 
drags into the Commons fifteen or 
twenty minutes late now, for those who 
eat must assemble and march to the Mess 
Hall in regular drill formation. It 
might be added in passing that the Com- 
mons puts Lake Forest way ahead of 
other S. A. T. C. schools, for it is suffi- 
ciently large and well equipped to take 
care of all the men at the same time. 
At Chicago TJ. and many other of the 
larger schools, the last company into 
the mess hall has to stand in line for 
half or three-quarters of an hour. Which 
is another reason why we are glad we 
came to Lake Forest. 



CALVIN DURAND COMMONS. 



After marching over in formation, 
each man takes his place and stands at 
attention until one of the top sergeants 
gives the command "Seats." In addition 
to the usual ten men at each table one, 
a corporal, sits at the end and serves 
his "children", as the boys call them- 
selves. The tables are no longer cov- 
ered with tablecloths and napkins, but 
with glistening white oilcloth. The 
waiters are no longer "waiters", but 
"K. P's." The King is King no longer, 
but Mess Sergeant. After the majority 
have finished eating, the top sergeant 
gives "Rise!" and each man rises and 
stands at attention until the command 
"Dismissed!" is given. Then he may go 
or sit down and finish, as he wishes. 

We have the Music School with us 
this year, too. We had a nice little 
yell for them that goes like this : 

Do-re-mi-fa-sol Music School ! 

But somebody made a rule that there 
must be no yelling in the Mess Hall, 
so we don't get to use it. 

Another feature that everyone enjoys 
is the weekly concert by the orchestra 
during the dinner hour. We have some 
excellent musical talent this year, and 
we have every reason to be proud of 
our band and orchestra. 

Every evening except Saturday and 
Sunday, the tables are cleared off and 



supervised study is conducted from 7:00 
to 9:1.5, with a ten minute intermission 
at 8:00. To insure every man's working 
and freedom from interruption, no talk- 
ing, except in connection with studies is 
allowed, and no magazine reading or 
letter writing is permitted. One mem- 
ber of the faculty, assisted by sergeants 
and corporals, presides every evening. 

Occasionally the routine of study is 
broken by a talk of such a nature as 
to be interesting to S. A. T. C. men. 
Last week Private Stallford of the 4th 
Canadian Battalion of the Canadian 
Expeditionary Forces told the men of 
his experiences over there, especially at 
the battle of Vimy Ridge, where he lost 
a foot and was also wounded in the 
neck and in the arm. His story, told 
in easy conversational style, was im- 
mensely interesting and there was the 
thrill of action in it that made all the 
boys eager to be "up and at 'em". We 
hope we may have more like him soon. • 

While it is still difficult for many of 
the men to concentrate in so large a 
group, where there are so many things 
to divert the attention, things are im- 
proving, and we believe that the study 
hall plan may be called a success. 



Sigma Tau announces the initiation 
of Lorraine Monday. 



16 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENT0R 

Published weekly during the collegiate 
year by the students of Lake Forest 
College. 
Board of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '19. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Ralph Stewart. '20. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 

Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Otis Chatfield-Taylor, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

James Crawford, '22. 

Howard Wood, '22. 

Prof. W. R. Bridgeman. 
Faculty and Alumni. 
Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est. Illinois, as second-class matter. 



-HY is chapel like a modern 
frog? Foolish question No. 
41144. 

The answer is simple. Old Isaak 
Walton or somebody like him remarked 
that one never could judge the direction 
of a frog's next jump. Now modern 
biologists have given friend Isaak an 
appropriate place among the has-beens. 
By the application of a few scientific 
principles they are able not only to tell 
the direction of a frog's next jump but 
also the time at which he will make the 



In olden days we used to trip to 
chapel with much the same spirit that 
Isaak watched the frog. We knew the 
time, to be sure, but we didn't know the 
direction of the next jump. We might 
be treated to almost anything — from a 
discourse on "The Realistic Tendency of 
Modern French Literature" to an im- 
passioned appeal that we give the 
Binomial Theorem its proper place in 
our young lives. But now — time and 
the Kaiser have changed many things. 
We still know when chapel will begin. 
Not the hour, oh no ! Chapel no longer 
is regulated by clock or beil. It now 
commences when the seats at the right 
are filled. If, perchance, the bugler 
forgets to bugle, even tho the girls are 
in their places, leaning forward with 
eager eyes and ears, does anything hap- 
pen? Nay, nay, Pauline! Nothing hap- 
pens until the bugler wakes up, winds 
his mellow horn, and our young Persu- 



ings march in. Then, and then only, 
do we rise and sing hymn No. 463. 
Should things be reversed and the bugles 
bugle too early what happens? The 
girls stroll in three minutes before the 
bell rings only to be glared at disap- 
provingly by the speaker and such of 
the faculty as have assembled. The men 
are there so chapel has started. Could 
anything be simpler? 

But now for the direction of the frog's 
leap. Here indeed modern science has 
removed all uncertainty. No matter 
what happens the result is inevitable. 
The frog imtt jump towards the men. 
In the last month we have heard of the 
benefits that will come to a S. A. T. C. 
man who applies modern psychology to 
the strenuous period he spends in study 
hall. Of course study is an unknown 
quantity in Lois Durand so why apply 
psychology there? We also have dis- 
covered that men are the "Salt" of any 
college community. 

"Shall we sing 'The Marseillaise?' 
By the way do j'ou men know it? No? 
Very well, we will omit it this morn- 
ing." And so it goes — the frog never 
misses a jump. 

Now scientific accuracy is delightful 
but isn't it a little monotonous? After 
all didn't Isaak get more fun out of his 
delightful uncertainty concerning the 
frog's next jump than we do out of 
our dull assurances that given the usual 
stimulus the usual reaction will follow? 
What would we do should the unex- 
pected happen ? Won't someone try it 
and see? 



SINCE the dedication of our ser- 
vice flag a year ago no ne*w 
stars have been added for the 
men who have gone into the 
service; nor have we changed the 
blue stars to gold of those who have 
"gone west." Surely something should 
be done about this! One would think 
that they had been forgotten soon after 
they had gone into the service which 
of course isn't the case. 

But why not show that this isn't so 
and that we do think of them often by 
this recognition. Let us pay our respect 
to those who have died for the worthy 
cause, in this small way and have a 
real up to date service flag. 

ONLY one drawback remains to 
prevent Lake Forest from be- 
ing a thoroughly well-equipped 
institution. The high and exalted 
office of newsboy has not yet 
been filled. Short rations of sugar, and 
butterless meals have all been accepted 
in good humor as a matter of course, 
but a newspaperless campus in war 
times is unbearable. Girls, here is one 
more opportunity to show your patriot- 
ism. 



Pass in Review 

Some of the newly appointed cor- 
porals without previous military exper- 
ience have shown considerable creative 
genius in inventing strange commands, 
but the brown derby is unhesitatingly 
awarded to the popular top sergeant of 
Co. A who, when marching in a column 
of squads bursts out with the command 
'Platoons, left by squads!" This -sort 
of thing should be encouraged as it adds 
zest to the dull routine of drill, and 
we feel sure that his originality will 
be a great point in the Sergeant's favor 
at the officers' Training School at Rock- 
ford. 

The following ditty to the tune of 
"The Sergeant" by Corporal Montgom- 
ery, we believe is worthy of publica- 
tion: 

Ferry Hall, Ferry Hall, it is the best 
of ail. 

We're over there in the morning. 
Before the bugle call. 
Lights on! Shades up! the view is 

surely fine. 
But then the darned old watchman, 
He gives us double time! 

Sergeant Crawford of the band: 
"Miller, did you think you could smoke 
at attention?" 

Miller: "No sir, I thought I'd try 
it and see." 

The little dTama, appearing below, 
was enacted a while ago. No comment 
is made: 

ALL IS NOT GOLD THAT GLITTERS 

A playlet in two scenes 

Cast 

Phil of the S. A. T. C. 

Fat ditto 

Virginia a coed 

Lorraine ditto 

Scene I 

(In the Institute) 

Fat: Match you a half dollar, Phil! 

Phil (Reaching for same and tossing it 

up) : What have you got? 
Fat (with air of nonchalance and John 

D. ) : Heads! You win! (Tosses 

over half dollar to Phil.) 
Virginia and Lorraine (whisper in a^ved 

unison): Ooh, Ain't be grand, he 

must have lots of those! 

[Girls exeunt] 

Curtain 

Scene II 

(Same as Scene I after girls have left) 

Fat: Gimme back my half dollar, Phil! 

Phil : Weren't you playing for keeps ? 
Fat: No. 
Phil: Oh, very well. (Tosses back 

Fat's half dollar.) 
Fat: Thanks Phil. Got a cigarette? 
[Curtain] 

The college community expects to wel- 
come back Mr. and Mrs. Burnap this 
week. 



THE S T E N T O R 



17 



Jen and Mary 

FOR SALE— At Lois Hall— forty 
pounds of old pie crusts. Extra heavy 
quality — very durable. Junk dealers 
call in the rear Saturday morning be- 
tween nine and twelve. 

We hear a rumor that hereafter the 
honorable inmates of Lois Durn are to 
be prohibited from thrusting their mil- 
lion dollar marcelles thru the front 
windows. 

Judging from the subdued snores 
t*eard in Monday morning class, the 
male contingent must have appreciated 
those leaves. 

We have heard of duel personalities, 
but we never expected to catch our 
worthy H. E. H. in a dreary dark cor- 
ner of the Institute cellar, firmly clutch- 
ing the necks of two harmless males. 

Yea, verily necessity is the mother of 
invention — L. Sprecher uses washing 
powder in place of powdered sugar. 

We exclaim with the poets of all 
ages "Ain't Frosh the woist nuts?" 
The latest is the extreme caution of 
two frosh who told Miss Hamilton she 
might come in if she would keep still. 
Come again! 

. Anybody needing a plumber, tinker, 
mason, bricklayer, or artisan apply to 
Josephine Martin Esquire. We'll say 
she's one of the seven wonders! Noah 
isn't in it — in case of flood call Jo! 

Here's a deep one— "-why is the stuff 
in this column like the constituents of 
L. D. H. desserts? Stale dope used to 
fill up space. 

Which last reminds us of a most 
touching ballad, entitled "Fate." 

There was a little apple sauce, 

We had it Monday noon. 
T'was slick and green as Irish moss — 

We left it for the cat. 

There was a dish of gelatine 
T'was served us Tuesday noon. 

Alack! I cried — "the guilotine!" 
And quickly left the room. 

There was a dish of gooey rice 
They cooked it Wednesday noon 

I bravely smiled and said t'was nice 
But still there was that rice. 

There was some lovely pineapple. 

We had it Thursday noon 
We ate and ate that pineapple 

And prayed that it was gone. 

There was some funny chocolate dope, 

They sprung it Friday noon 
I tasted it and mumbled "Soap" 

How nearly did we croak! 

On Saturday I changed my tune — 

A new dish then they brot 
Alas, alas, I grinned too soon — 

"Unpopular Review" ! 



Academy Football 

Even tho we can have no football 
games of our own this year, we are not 
to be deprived of the chance to see a 
good game nearly every Saturday. The 
Acad lias a fast team. They have 
played three games this fall. The first 
game was between the two teams — the 
orange and black. The next week they 
won from Hammond witli a score of 
26-0. Last Saturday they played Mor- 
gan Park. 

It was a fine game, the Acad of 
course in the lead. It is up to the 
College people this year to support the 
Acad, as those men have always sup- 
ported us in former years. Here's for 
a champion year Acad! 



Short Stops 

We were greatly relieved the other 
morning to find a whole Hag (lying at 
the top of the pole. The lake breezes 
had so torn the old one that nothing 
was left but the field of blue. The new 
one is a larger and finer specimen. 

Paul Y. Sieux has accepted a position 
as official bell ringer to relieve John 
Heinie. This is a more satisfactory 
arrangement as Mr. Dorn was sometimes 
occupied with other work and could not 
ring it on time. The first day Paul was 
so engrossed in his new job that he 
frogot to go to his math, class. 

Because Vernon Huffman and Herbert 
Sehleman missed their trains Sunday 
evening and were late for the forma- 
tion, all in Company B were confined to 
the barracks until taps. During the 
evening the tardy ones were the guests 
at an informal party given in their 
honor. Paddles were in evidence. 

Professor Van Steenderen in French 
class, trying to get Clark Greenlee to 
pronounce "tiroir" : "Give that word 
again and trill the r's". 

Greenlee, after several vain attempts: 
"I can't roll 'em." 

Leslie Chapman spent last Sunday 
visiting friends at the Naval Station 
and in Waukegan. 

Due to the early sunsets now, it is 
quite dark when the men have the even- 
ing formations. A big searchlight has 
been installed at the Commons to throw 
light upon the companies. 



Some apple sauce and gelatine 

With rice and pineapple 
And then some chocolate dope mixed in 

With fruit n' everything. 

Yes, Sherman said it, he was. right! 

I knew it anyway — 
"Ashes to ashes, and dust to dust — 

If Monday don't get you Saturday 
must!" 



Tea at Mrs. Bridgeman'g 

Mrs. Bridgeman entertained a number 
of Lois Durand Hall girls at a delight- 
ful tea last Thursday afternoon. The 
house was beautifully decorated with 
fall (lowers. While the girls were busily 
knitting Red Cross sweaters, Mrs. 
Bridgeman gave a very interesting ac- 
count of her son, Ray's aerial experi- 
ences in France. 

Every one thoroughly enjoyed the 
afternoon. 



Music School Notes 

The cordial welcome extended to the 
School of Music has already made us 
feel very much at home in North Hall. 
'We are proud to contribute to the 
Stentor and we hope to make Music 
School history worth the writing. We 
are glad of the opportunity that has 
come to us through the gracious hospi- 
tality of Lois Hall to become acquainted 
with our neighbors. We shall remember 
with delight the Hallowe'en party and 
the tea. Both affairs were greatly en- 
joyed by all and the girls showed them- 
selves charming hostesses, which made 
the occasion memorable. 

The most enjoyable time of day in the 
Music School is the twilight hour when 
we gather for tea and knitting in the 
School parlors. The doors are always 
open to our guests and we chat as well 
as enjoy the latest news from France. 

In the campaign for better spoken 
English, which was held last week 
throughout the entire country, the School 
took active part. The fines collected — 
the amount was not small — for 
grammatical mistakes, incorrect pro- 
nunciation and use of slang are to be 
given to the coming Y. M. C. A. fund. 
Francelia — "You can't play the piano 
now, because I'm going to sit in it." 

"It is an ill wind that blows nobody 
good." 

Miss Harris — "Where are you going 
to be examined ?" 

Vesta — "In the second story." 

The most exciting event of all which 
comes in the near future, November 16th, 
is the large public concert to be given 
at the Art Institute by Guiomar Navaes, 
the .young Brazilian pianist. 

Margaret Mills has been detained at 
her home in Chicago on account of ill- 
ness. 

Marjorie McColIum spent Thursday 
and Friday in Chicago. 

Kathryn Horton has been called to 
her home in Escanaba, Michigan, on 
account of the death of her grandfather. 

Beth Theyer entertained her sister at 
the hall on Monday. 



18 



THE STENTOR 





STYLES 


THAT 


PLEASE | 


for 


COLLEGE MEN 


and WOMEN 


RASMUSSEN 


BROS 


. BOOT SHOP 




Market Sq 


U ARE 



use BOWMANS safe milk 

Perfectly pasteurized milK bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Gleneoe 70 Highland Park 9 J01-1C9 Vine Ave. 



Personals 



Lieutenant R. W. Hughes, ex '19, won 
hia commission in the aviation several 
months ago visited the campus a week 
ago. Bob reports that the aviation is 
tamer than most pt us imagine and that 
his only thrill came when he attempted 
to land in a swamp, the wheels stuck 
in the mud and the machine went over 
on its nose. Well, Bob was always an 
unexcitable youth. 

Kappa Sigma has received visits from 
Don Carr, Herbert Roos, Richard Mor- 
row, Charles Beard, and Bud Pearce. 

The Little Paddling Party Friday 
night certainly started something on the 
South Campus. 

Soon after the opening of the College 
term, Mrs. Nollen and the two little 
girls visited the campus for several 
days. Mrs. Nollen was very enthusias- 
tic about her work last winter in the 
southern Hostess House, but ex- 
pects to spend this year in Chicago 
while her daughters are attending the 
University School. 

Lieut. Jack Reese is commanding of- 
ficer at Iowa State University. He is 
now staying at the Kappa Sigma house. 

Josephine Clarke and Helen Hoyer 
spent the week-end with Mary Burnett 
in Waukegan. 

Word has been received that Lieu- 
tenant Francis Miller, ex-'19, is seri- 
ously wounded in France. His wound 
is a compound fracture of the thigh, 
which is considered very dangerous. 

Lydia Spreeher spent Monday and 
Tuesday at the home of Mary Merchant 
in Waukegan. 

Julia Hoffman and Ruth Kennedy 
spent Saturday in Chicago. 

Lorraine Maclay attended the an- 
nouncement party of one of her class- 
mates while in the city Saturday. 



Word comes to Digamma that Snell- 
grove has arrived safely overseas, and 
is now located in England. 

"Doc" Schenk and Chappick visited 
Digamma October 13. 

Tommy Tucker's laugh was heard the 
other night, so he must be recovering 
from the last shot. 

Get your onion sandwiches from 
"Spuds". 

I'm going to Camp Grant, fellers! 

Why? 

Got another soak — "Puss" Myeu. 

What happened to Fitzpatrick's 
chicken? 

Donald C. Woods and Fred Bates were 
here recently for the initiation of Cal- 
vin C. Beauchamp, William J. Wilde- 
man, and Eugene W. Tucker, into 
Digamma. 

Micky Beddoes in his sleep : "Some 
woman, Oh! What a wonderful woman!" 

Ike (sobbing) : "Who's got my girl?" 

Edson VanSickle visited Digamma 
last week-end, and incidentally called at 
Lois Hall. 



C.G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL- 



#TT $65.00 takes my 5250.00 

^8J size phonograph, one diamond, 
—ii one sapphire point needle, and 200 
steel needles and records. All new- 
used two weeks. Act quick. 317 Greenleaf 
Ave., Wilmette. 

200 ft. from Linden Sta. Mil. Elec. 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

DEALER IN 

Gents ' Furnishings 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



FRANK BULOW 

Barber 

Under Jensen's Shoe Store 
RAILROAD TICKETS 



Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSEP, Prop 
Phone I 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



C. T. Gunn Co. 
Grocers 

Agency Huyler's Candi s 

Curtice Bros. Goads LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F J HELD, Prop. 



Phc 



175 



Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 
O'Neill'* Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



TZTTT317I C1Z"V" Successor to 

KUr>.t!/L,S.K I Harry Levir 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxisat All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STBNTOR 



19 



Illllllllililllll 


:r:\\.-r: \., 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 


■ 1 


i 1 

We take orders for 


i — -i 

Uniforms Shofs Hats 


Hi 


m 


Officers' Made- 
to-Measure 


CHARLES GLASS 


■ 


== 


Uniforms in 


All Military Furnishings 


= 


^^ 


O. D. Serge, 


are lower in price here 


= 


m 


Gabardines, 


than anywhere else. 


== 


m 


and Whipcords 


Telephone 1216 HIGHWOOD, ILLINOIS 
■ _ 


eg 


, .i[ii!!ltl Hi iiiii; 


:,:::::,:_. ..,.!..,. :• 


- k == 

lll!llllllillllllll[«llBIIIIIIllll!!llll!illll!!lli!lll!!IIIIIIIIIW 



The V^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



A Fine Personality 

Say, fellers, I got a girl down at 
Purdue ! 

(To be continued next week.) 

Fat Brown, (leading the band and 
smoking a cigarette) : 

ATTENTION! (Puff, puff.) 

What the deuce is the matter with 
you guys, paralyzed? 

( Puff, puff. ) He can't understand ifl 
nohow. 

FOUND: Going north on Sheridan 
Road, Dougan's pipe. Some powerful 
pipe. Heinie Corn now has it for a 
walking cane. 

William J. Wildeman spent the week- 
end with his parents in Madison. 

Col. Offenhiser has been called to 
his home in Pearl City by the serious 
illness of his brother. 

Sgt. Dougan was called home for the 
week-end, and is now recuperating in 
the hospital. 

Wood swings some paddle, how about 
it Hunn? 

Mildred Gerlack went home over the 
week-end and drove back Sunday with 
her parents. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pettigrew drove to 
Lake Forest Sunday to visit their 
daughter, Vera. 

Josephine Martin spent the week-end 
in Chicago visiting friends. 

Betty Mason was the guest of the 
Theta Psi's Saturday night. 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



GO TO 

Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 



/. B. Veselsfyy 



Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllEllllllllllllllllllllllllllllf 
/^1 For Light 

I W7C For Heat 
KJVl*3 For Power 

North Shore Gas Co. 

j]!!!!ll!llllllll!lllllllllllllllll!!!!l!li!l!il^ 



S. Fell 

MILITARY GOODS AT 
LOW PRICES 

STETSON ARMY HATS 



f 



13 S. St. Johns Avenue 
Highland Park, HI 



iiiiiiiiiiii!iHiiKii[iitiiiiii[iiiiiniinniiiiiii!]ii]iii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiii(iiiniifliiiHininiiiiniiiiiiiiuiip 
The 

Sheridan Cafe 

MARIAN H. CRAIG 

Two Good Places to Eat 
HOME and HERE 

10 N. Sheridan Road 
HIGHLAND PARK :: ILL. 

!llllllllllllllllllll!lll!li!l!!Ii!l«llllllllllllllll 



K QDA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 12:00 m. 
1:00 p. m. to 5:00 p. m. 

Dr.C.W. Young Dr. R.O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Lake Forest Illinois 



L. Greenberg 

ELECTRIC SHOE REPAIRING 

SHOP 

55 Deerpath Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILI . 



20 I 



THE STENTOR- 



■ 



lllllll!l!l!llfl!lllllllillil!il!l!!lllllllllll 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Always offers a liberal training under experienced professors and excellent provision, for 
the physical and social welfare of its students, in' a beautiful environment. 

THE S. A..T. C. 

As is now well known, units of trie Students Armu Training Corps are maintained at 
manu colleges, to which are admitted graduates of high schools or those offering an equi- 
valent preparation. Such men are inducted into the Armu and given subsistance, pau of 
$30 per month, and both military and collegiate instruction. The unit at Lake Forest is 
limited to about 200 men, and experience has already proved that the conditions here 
are most favorable in the way of housing, mess-hall, drill-ground and direction. As a num- 
ber of the present quota are likely to be promoted to an Officers' Training Camp in 
December, there will be places available for new-comers about January 1. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties are p- 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY g 

A preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858- ■ 

FERRY HALL Hf 

A school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. m 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC ( 

With an independent organization, offering superior advantages. 

For information about any department, address |" 

_ PRESIDENT'S OFFICE | 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, III. | 

iiiiiiiiiiuuuniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiuiiuiii! 



JENSEN &SUNDM ARK 
SHOES 

We Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 
Ticket! 



DO 

7 MARKET SQUARE 

Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 

Cleaning and Pressing . . $1.50 

Pressing ... . . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



-J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m- 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, III. 



M. IT. Hussey & Co. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & S011& 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written. 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



>* 



V' 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



+ C 



% 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, November 15, 1918. 



NUMBER 4. 



Monday's Peace 
Celebration 

The campus received the official 
peace news early Monday morning 
with less hilarity than on Thursday, 
though with a deeper realization of 
its full meaning. 

Chapel was held as usual and was 
a most impressive service, opening 
with the Battle Hymn of the Repub- 
lic. Dr. Wright announced classes 
as usual after which he gave in a 
very concise and direct talk some of 
the main reasons why the tidings of 
peace should bring rejoicing and hap- 
piness to our land. 

After Chapel a number of Lois 
Hallers, unable to resist the chance to 
participate in the Chicago celebra- 
tion, cut classes and went to the city. 
By noon a half holiday was proclaim- 
ed in the College, including all the 
S. A. T. C. In the afternoon Market 
Square was the scene of a very en- 
thusiastic and dignified celebration. 
The Reverend Roberts gave a very 
appropriate address and Reverend 
Edwards offered a prayer of thanks- 
giving. 

November 11th has already taken 
its place among the greatest days in 
history and will be celebrated in 
every civilized land for all years to 
come. 



Co. «B" Dance 

Saturday evening, November 9th, 
Company B. of the S. A. T. C. gave a 
dance at the Durand Art Institute. 
The dance was a great success — due 
in part to the able committee chosen 
from Company B., consisting of Otis 
Chatfield-Taylor, Morris Mudge, and 
Merle McEvoy. 

Miss Hamilton acted as chaperon 
and after every one had greeted her 
the dancing started. A four-piece 
orchestra from Benson's furnished 
the music. It was very peppy and 
proved to be the best we have had 
this year. Everyone had a good time, 
and Co. "B." may be complimented. 
The close of the evening came all too 
soon, and when Miss Hamilton was 



U. W. W. Campaign On 



Study Hall for 
Flunks Only 

The past ten days have witnessed 
happenings of considerable import- 
ance in the S. A. T. C. First, and 
foremost, we got our pay. $18.60 
after deducting insurance premium 
and installment on Liberty Bond. 
Great stuff! 

Then they have decided that we 
are not getting enough exercise. Se 
we are to go out to play every even- 
ing between 4:30 and Retreat. Every 
man will be required to participate in 
some form of athletics in that time. 
The exercise will undoubtedly do us 
good, but its going to make that two- 
hours-study-for«every-hour-recitation 
impossible. Well, we're willing. The 
study hall idea has been given up, 
too. From now on, only the men 
who are down in their work will be 
required to study together under 
supervision. The rest will study in 
their rooms during the evening study 
period. Those who are down will 
have to report to the study hall, which 
will probably be moved to the Li- 
brary, in the evening period, but 
every vacant hour during the day as 
well. 

The influx of new men has made it 
necessary to give up the fraternity 
rooms to provide space. The furni- 
ture was moved from the rooms into 
the attics on Saturday. While at 
present it is possible to congregate in 
the attics, they are not heated and 
cold weather will leave the men with- 
out get-together places. It is a hard 
sacrifice to make, but a necessary 
one, and the men have made it with- 
out complaint. 



heard to say — "Time to come in 
girls" everyone was sorry that the 
evening had been so short. 



By this time everybody on the 
campus knows about the U. W. W. 
campaign and has subscribed to it, 
we hope very liberally. The spirit 
among the students has been un- 
usually good and everybody has "dug 
deep." 

If there was anybody on the cam- 
pus who had not made up his mind 
to part himself from a good share of 
his beloved hoard for the cause, he 
must have changed his mind during 
chapel. We were made to see, as 
never before, the pressing need for 
money to help the war-ridden coun- 
tries of Europe. 

The girls of Lois Hall have been 
working enthusiastically, each class 
trying to collect the largest amount 
in proportion to the size of the class. 
By the plan of pledging used every- 
body — even the proverbially "broke" 
one can do his duty. It is a modifi- 
cation of the good old fashioned in- 
stallment plan. 

Dr. Wright has received several 
postcards written by prisoners in 
German camps which tell of the help 
given them by the Y. M. C. A. These 
postcards will be given to the ones 
making the largest subscriptions. 
Surely such a souvenir of the war 
would be worth trying for. 

The campaign is closed tomorrow. 
Anybody who has not sent in his 
pledge — or who feels that he can pos- 
sibly give more should do so imme- 
diately. Remember it's a chance to 
give to one of the greatest organi- 
zations ever formed. It's the chance 
for us who have not fought to do our 
share and we will do it! 



Sigma Tau Tea 

The Sigma Tau Sorority enter- 
tained at a very delightful tea on 
Monday afternoon. Miss Hamilton, 
Miss Powell and Miss Hospes were 
among the guests. Very delicious re- 
freshments were served and the girls 
who had just returned from the 
Peace Celebration in Chicago related 
amusing and interesting accounts of 
their experiences. 



- 



22 



THE 



T E N T O R 



Guest at Lois Hall 

Would you know the weight, 
height, and appearance of your fu- 
ture spouse — just for preparedness 
sake? Would you like to know how 
soon your next check is coming? Or 
how many letters you are going to 
receive in the next mail? Or how 
soon the kaiser will perish from the 
earth- or- or well anything? If you 
would then consult the teeming or- 
acle at Lois Durand — the never fail- 
ing — soul satisfying prophet — "Sib's" 
ouija board. 

Anytime day or night, it is always 
ready for business. In fact there is 
scarcely a girl in the hall who has 
not had her entire life mapped out 
at least three different times. 
Thru the transom we hear — 
"Oh! ooooh! d-a-r-k! How grand 
— one of those tall dashing brunettes 
with a little moustach!" "Oh — my 
dear — don't you simply adore dark 
men?" "But it never said tall, it 
might have been — " 

"Ouija, now tell me truly" — (in 
sepulchral tones) "Is he tall?" "Oh 
— 'No' — you pushed it — I felt it — 
honestly" "Why, I never did — I just 
concentrated." "Ask it something 
else — " "Ouija — what are we going 
to have for lunch — hash or spag- 
hetti?" "Ouija, are we going to have 
a real Xmas vacation?" "Ouija is 
Van feeling good today?" "Oh! 
grand!" "What's the latest scan- 
dal?" "T-H-E-O" "Now don't push!" 
"O, girls that can't be the bell — the 
last one — oh run!" "Oh girls — do 
you suppose Sib settles his love af- 
fairs with the Ouija?" 



New Men 



The following men have arrived 
and registered in the past week: 
Ackmann, Alvin Frederick Elgin. 
Brennan, Walter James Elgin. 

Brewer, Herbert Archie Hammond, 

Indiana. 
Carlson, Marshall, J. Kenosha, Wis. 
Chapin, Earl Bernard Elgin. 

Christman, Edward Robert Elgin. 
Christenson, Irving Carl Chicago. 
Cobb, Warren Alfred Aurora. 

Eric, Erickson Harold Rockford. 

Fredberg, Clifford Walter Belvidere. 
Punk, Edward Bramwell Warsaw, 

Indiana. 
Garman, Ray Benjamin Elgin. 

Gurney, Lyman Fox Highland Park. 

Illinois. 
Hedges, George Braid Elgin. 

Heffson, Harold Thomas Rockford. 
Helm, Gordon Haeger Elgin. 

Hurbitz, Samuel Elgin. 

Johnson, Arvid Einar Elgin. 

Johnson, Paul Lee Elgin. 

Lillis, Norman Kenneth Rockford. 
Krick, Paul Louis Elgin. 

Kuhlman, Edwin William Elgin. 

Meyer, Edwin Harman Elgin. 

Myers, Merlin James Elgin. 

Okerson, Clarence Ebert Elgin. 

Rea, Richard Spalding Elgin. 

Saunders, Clair Frank Elgin. 

Schmid, Albert Adolph Elgin. 

Schweitzer, Jr. Edward C. Chicago. 
Shultis, Louis Henry Antioch. 

Stone, Richard Gail Elgin. 

Taylor, William Jackson Kenilworth. 
Thayer, Myron Alden Rockford. 

Vorbau, Elmer Edward Chicago. 

Wallace, LeRoy Jason Aurora. 



Jack Straw 

After strenuous competition and many 
try-outs, the following cast has been 
chosen for W. Somerset Maughn's "Jack 
Straw." 

Jack Straw Paul Oppenheiser 

Ambrose Holland . . . . F. W. Chamberlain 

Rev. Abbott Arthur Nichols 

Mr. Wither. .......... .Howard Dickey 

Mr. Parker Jennings. .. .Edwin Johnson 

Vincent Parker Jennings . Leonard Huffer 

Lord Serlo F. L. Wilson 

Count von Brewer. . . .Philip Speidel 

Footman Vernon Huffman 

,,. ., (Russell Rice 

\\ alters 1 

| Horace Emerson 

Mrs. Parker Jennings 

Gwendolyn Massey 

Ethel Parker Jennings Anne Merner 

Rosie Abbott Elsie Engle 

Lady Wanley Lorraine Maclay 

Mrs. Withers Gertrude Gifford 



Death of Wakefield 

Sergeant Coberly has just received 
word that his roommate during his first 
year here, Maurice Wakefield, ex-'20, 
died of pneumonia resulting from influ- 
enza i>-. the S. A. T. C. unit at Ames, 
Iowa. 



over here, and suppose I'll be just un- 
lucky enuf to never see France." 

In English III 

The Freshmen are doing remarkably 
well, along lines of expression, in Mr. 
Troutman's Oral Composition course. 
There is, however, a certain tendency 
with some of them, while exhibiting 
their Demosthenesian powers, to show 
signs of nervousness. This takes a dif- 
ferent effect on almost every individual. 
Some have difficulty in keeping the 
knees stiff, others have a peculiar gasp- 
ing for breath, while a certain few sway 
from side to side giving the audience 
the impression of being lulled to sleep 
in a motor boat. Oh, it's Wednesday 
morning "when a feller needs a friend." 

Instructors have always told us that 
this fear and trembling grows less with 
experience, yet we students have failed 
to notice any difference since we recited 
memory gems to our latest appearance 
in college. But "screw your courage to 
the sticking post and you will not fail." 

My name was called, I shook with fear 

A public speech! Ah me! 
"Oh! Mr. Troutman not today 

I'm not prepared you see." 

Next week I could not shirk the deed 
And when my name was called 

I blankly walked up to the front 
And nearly "Went and bawled." 

My thots they fled and left me blank 
My voice it shook with fear 

I talked of what, I know not now 
I felt my "Doom" was near. 

I stammered thru some rambling notes 

And then I took my chair 
And as the criticisms flew 
I prayed I would die there. 
B— U— T 
"The First Hundred Years are the 
Hardest 
Cheer up Frosh." 



Letter from Maplesden 

Lieut. Lawrence Maplesden is com- 
manding officer at Kenyon College. 
Gambier, Ohio. He writes that he is 
very busy, his usual hour for retiring 
being between 1 a. m. and 3 a. m. The 
"flu" hit Kenyon College rather hard. 
"We lost two of our men thru pneu- 
monia, out of over forty casete. Now 
we have it down to three cases, and 
expect air to pull thru. The quaran- 
tine is still on, however. 

"I also received d card about a week 
ago, saying that Bob had arrived safely 
overseas. So I ani the only one left 



Who Will Manicure? 

Mr. J. A. Brisbin of Elgin is to start 
a barber shop on the campus. The new 
shop will probably be located somewhere 
in College Hall. It will be up to date 
in every particular, and will be able fo 
take care of every man in the S. A. 
T. C. without his go'mg off the Campus. 
We have not been informed whether Mr. 
Brisbin will be prepared to cut bangs 
for the Lois Hallers or-not. Mr. Bris- 
bin Will also be band instructor, for 
which position he is fitted by years of 
experience, c 

■ ■- . ■ 9d xo saigiifci: 



THE ST EN TOR 



23 



The Foolish Maidens 

And it came to pass that several 
of the maidens who dwelt in the hall 
called Lois Durand, betook them- 
selves one day down town to lunch- 
eon, feeling much pangs of hunger in 
their stomachs and having a desire 
to appease the unrequited appetite. 
And lo! as they did sit amongst many 
viands — more than had been seen by 
them for many moons — there was a 
rumor breezed about that the War 
was ended. And the rumor grew and 
did nourish as it was caught from 
mouth to mouth — yea, even as a bit 
of scandal traveleth in Lois Durand 
Hall, so also this rumor was spread 
among the multitude. And the maid- 
ens, having keen ears for such, and 
not being of a critical mind in their 
pleasant state of content with food 
in general — caught up the general cry 
and carried it home to their Hall- 
mates — yea verily, with many cries 
and shouts of exaltation tore they 
homeward bearing the glorious tid- 
ings. 

Even as they had believed, so also 
believed the other credulous maidens 
— yea, even unto the dean of that 
Hall called Lois Durand. And not 
having room within for suck cele- 
bration as occurred unto them they 
went out into the open calling, "Hail! 
the war is ended! Peace be unto us. 
Hail! Hail!" And as they approach- 
ed unto the men of the S. A. T. C. 
they raised their cries lustily call- 
ing, "Come, brethren, join with us. 
We hail the end of the war." But 
the men, being soldiers and strong 
men did resist the shouts of these 
maidens and did cry " *Tis false al- 
arm," and did turn their backs except 
such as could not resist the faces of 
such maidens as seemed fair unto 
them. And these did approach and 
listen unto these false utterings and 
did join their voices to the cry — and 
so the alarm did spread even unto the 
most unwilling listener. 

Then cried some one of the multi- 
tude — "Hence — fetch the flute and 
cymbals — let us make merry and re- 
joice — yea verily, fetch ye the harps 
and bass drums and we will make a 
'joyful noise' ". So the musicians did 
bring their instruments and did strike 
up with singing. And as they sang 
they marched even unto the village 
where were many more foolish people 
raising their voices in song of jubil- 
ation. And many children did gather 
about with banners and did join . to 
the procession of youths and maids. 
And as they were gathered singing, 
lo! appeareth the village fire-truck 
with loud clanging of bells and many 



of the men of the town. And as the 
procession did take up its course so 
also followed the fire-truck adding to 
the loud commotion. 

And there were those who spake 
and said, "Verily, this is folly, ye 
know not what ye do, for ye have 
gathered up news which is not offi- 
cial." But their voices were as one 
among the many and their sayings 
were not muchly heard and such as 
heard did rather not believe. 

So the celebration lasted for many 
hours and such as became foot sore 
did hobble and hope for rest by the 
wayside. But the military men felt 
not the strain — being accustomed to 
many footsteps and did forget the 
maidens with high heels. And these 
did arrive home weak and weary and 
did have many cross and crabby hours 
from their feet which felt not as they 
used to — and these when they heard 
of their folly did rave and tear their 
hair and did say 'twas all for naught 
that they had lost their comfort and 
their good feet — and they did betake 
themselves to their cots for rest and 
the remainder of the multitude did 
disperse to make dates for the dance 
that night and to ponder over what 
had come to pass. 

Yea, verily, the wise are few and 
the foolish many, and the way of ru- 
mor is not dependable. 



Duke tells us his friends about 
town have been asking who the crazy 
fat man in the parade last Thursday 
was. 

We surmise that Chat will be more 
careful to prefix "Lieutenant" next 
time. He got away with it better 
than we expected, at that. Leave it 
to Chat. 

Doodes Carr, of the "Fighting 
Twelfth" at The Great Lakes, drops 
in 'most every night. 

Owing to the giving up of the frat- 
ernity rooms, the Brown Derby for 
the Company B dance has not been 
awarded. Tom Hale therefore re- 
tains the title. 



Ticklers to right of them, 

Flags to the left of them. 

Mobs all around them, 

Pushed and hollered. 

Stormed at with shots and confetti 

Boldly they pushed and well, 

Through the jeering crowd 

Into the mouth of Hell 

They took the kaiser, 

A. S. 



The Band 

The band which lias been organized 
from the members of the S. A. T. C. is 
making rapid progress under the effi- 
cient leadership of James Crawford and 
Merle McEvoy, with Walter Brown as 
manager. 

The other members are: 

Walter Kinney French Horn 

Orville Kiltz Flute 

Arthur Seymour Bass Horn 

Clifford Harris Cornet 

Leonard Heuffer Trap Drummer 

Howard Baldwin Trombone 

Henry Young Clarinet 

Arthur Brisban Bass Horn 

Earle R. Ryan Cornet 

Edwin Lamphere Cornet 

Ralph Beddoes Drum 

Otis Chatfield-Taylor Bass Drum 

Kenneth Mason Cornet 

George Whither Cornet 

Albert Hale Flute 

Thomas Hale Cornet 

Charles Boehner Saxophone 

George Watson Saxophone 

Clark Greenlee Clarinet 



Girls' Gym. 

Our gymnasium work this year prom- 
ises to be most interesting and benefi- 
cial. We are beginning to realize the 
great importance of physical efficiency 
and so are resolved to get the most out 
of our work. 

Our schedule this year is slightly dif- 
ferent from last year. Three hours are 
offered and but two ho\irs a week are 
required. Swimming is compulsory. 
This class meets for one hour on Friday 
at three-thirty and at four-thirty at 
Ferry Hall. 

The two elections are dancing and reg- 
ular gym work, including exercises, 
hockey and basketball. The dancing 
classes meet for one hour on Tuesday. 
One at three-thirty, the other at four- 
thirty. However, since the weather is 
bo favorable for outdoor work, Miss 
Turnbull has decided to discontinue the 
dancing and devote that time to hockey 
work. So, since the regular gym work 
which occurs on Thursday is also devoted 
to hockey, should be plenty of time to 
practice in preparing for our games. 

These games we hope to be able to 
arrange with the Ferry Hall teams. 
Lois Durand Hall has always had every 
reason to be proud of its hockey teams 
and this year is no exception. Though 
the teams haven't been definitely picked 
as yet, the prospectives are very prom- 
ising. 

Our instructor Miss Turnbull is a 
most able and efficient teacher. She, we 
are sure, will make our gymnasium 
work very interesting and beneficial and 
under her supervision we hope to accom- 
plish much in our physical education. 



24 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the collegiate 
year by the students of Lake Forest 
College. 
Board of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '19. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Ralph Stewart. '20. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Otis Chatfield-Taylor, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

James Crawford, '22. 

Howard Wood, '22. 

Prof. W. R. Bridgeman. 
Faculty and Alumni. 
Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



THE war is over. There is no 
mistake, no false alarm this 
time. The drastic conditions 
of the armistice are sufficient guar- 
antee that Germany will not begin 
again. The big task seems to be 
completed. But is it? 

The morning papers of the coming 
days and weeks, and perhaps months 
will be eagerly sought after, for they 
will bear the news of what will be 
done in the great work of reconstruc- 
tion. How, and how soon will the 

"■y be demobilized? Who is going 
to rebuild France? What is going to 
be done with the S. A. T. C. These 
are questions the answers for which 
we may have to wait weeks or 
months. 

Meanwhile let us not slacken up 
our determination to do our best in 
the work before us. The man who is 
at present inducted into the S. A. 
T. C. and the man who had intended 
to enlist may feel that there is no 
longer a necessity or opportunity for 
him in the work of the S. A. T. C. 
It is not altogether surprising if such 
a feeling is encountered. 

But there are several excellent rea- 
sons why we should not get into that 
way of thinking. The first is that 
American soldiers may have to sit on 
the lid in Europe long enough for 
things to quiet down over there. 
More troops may have to be sent to 



Russia to straighten things out. 
Secondly, in order to obtain the real- 
ization of his principles of a perman- 
ent and just world-wide peace, 
President Wilson will need the sup- 
port of the United States Army. Any 
slackening of our efforts here will 
undermine that support just so much. 
If universal military training is in- 
stituted in this country officers will 
be needed. What is more natural 
than that these officers should come 
from the S. A. T. C. 

Finally, the opportunity to go to 
college with all expenses paid and 
thirty dollars a month besides, is the 
greatest thing in an educational way 
that has ever been offered. The gov- 
ernment has the use of this college 
contracted for until the first of next 
July. We will all be here until that 
time. You may consider that an ad- 
vantage or an unavoidable necessity. 
That depends on your point of view, 
and whether or not you realize the 
wonderful opportunity which the S. 
A. T. C. is offering. But it is a fact 
which must be faced, and he who is 
wise will make the best of it. So 
let's put the best there is in us into 
this thing — as if the war were only 
starting. 

"Let music swell the breeze, 
And ring from all the trees, 

Sweet freedom's song, 
Let mortal tongues awake, 
Let rocks their silence break, 

The sound prolong." 

L. F. C. has been singing this with 
more or less vigor all year. But 
none of us realized until last Thurs- 
day what real enthusiasm meant. 
We have all shrieked ourselves hoarse 
at football games and mass meetings, 
but these have always been pre-ar- 
ranged and more or less cut and 
dried. Last Thursday, however, will 
long be remembered in L. F. C. his- 
tory. The enthusiasm was spontan- 
eous. No one wanted to see what 
any one else would do. Music swell- 
ed the breeze of its own accord, and 
mortal tongues awoke with much en- 
ergy. Ferry Rocks, Acad Rocks, and 
College rocks burst forth with loud 
sounds, and the few walking mauso- 
leums that refused to brake silence 
were 'unwept, unhonored, and un- 
sung' — in fact they weren't even 
missed from the parade. 



PROBABLY almost everyone who 
ever took a pen in hand for 
the expression of his ideas will 
write something concerning the ef- 
fect of peace and the problems of re- 
construction, but we will not be pre- 
sumptuous enough to attempt to 
tackle such a large question. We 
will merely attempt to give our idea 
of what should happen here in the 
Lake Forest S. A. T. C. 

Almost every man at Lake Forest 
College is now being paid by the 
government for receiving a good 
education. Therefore, the cessation 
of hostilities should have absolutely 
no effect upon the efficiency or the 
spirit of the Student's Army Train- 
ing Corps. We should consider our 
being educated as an investment that 
our government is making and should 
deem it a point of honor to make the 
investment pay. The idea of those 
responsible for the S. A. T. C. plan 
was never solely to train soldiers. If 
it had been, we should have been 
sent directly to a camp devoted ex- 
clusively to getting troops in condi- 
tion to go overseas. The need for 
educated men to carry on the work of 
reconstruction both here and abroad 
was foreseen, and the unexpectedly 
early signing of the armistice should 
serve as a stimulus for harder work 
rather than as a cause for letting 
down, for we will be needed all the 
sooner to help in solving the great 
problem of readjustment in the period 
following the declaration of peace. 



The Stentor edits are doing their best 
to give you a snappy college paper. 
Crab all you want about our mistakes. . 
We know they are there. But help 
solve the problem by giving us the news 
as you know it. Try handing us an 
editorial — a bit of news — a breezy 
story — or even a poem. Do it now and 
see if the Stentor doesn't improve won- 
derfully. 



Patronize our advertisers because they 
are the leading dealers of our com- 
munity. They are patronizing our 
product — let's patronize theirs! "Turn 
about is fair play" — now let's do our 
part and show them how much it pays 
to stand by the college. 



There has been some misapprehen- 
sion upon .the part of the men as to 
when they could use the gymnasium. 
The impression seems to have been 
that the women had the use of the 
Gym every afternoon. As a matter 
of fact, they only have it on Tuesday 
and Thursday afternoons from 3:30 
to 5:30. The men are urged to take 
advantage of the gymnasium at all 
other times. The swimming pool has 
been empty so far this year because 
the city water is not adapted for this 
purpose. The college has opened up 
a new well and Mr. Hahnke promises 
us that the pool will be filled, pro- 
bably by the time this Stentor is is- 
sued. 



THE STENTOR 



25 



Jen and Mary 

They celebrate peace in the big city. 

"Jen, aren't you thrilled? 

"My dear, I'm thrilled as a bat!" 

"Henry, could anything be worse? 
— girl, can you imagine being in 
classes today? Those poor, poor fel- 
lows!" 

"Oh, Mary — look! Beth is trying 
to store all the confetti in the street 
— she had her mouth open trying to 
listen to the band and a man threw 
a whole bag of confetti in it!" 

"Oh my dear — ain't that a tragedy, 
tho? It's almost enough to make M. 
E. P. swear. Did you know that 
she was trying to learn all of the 
swear words in existence before 
Xmas?" 

"No-o-o! really — why on earth 
doesn't she go to drill — she'd learn 
them then!" 

"Leggo my flag — oh! Jen pick up 
my horn! oh! oh! oh! Push Jen — 
there!" 

"Now, where were we going — oh — 
look! 

"Mary — what in the name of 
breakfast food is that — is it Ft. Sher- 
idan on a rampage?" 

"Gosh, no Jen — can't you see the 
pennants — it's Northwestern cele- 
brating." 

"Well! I wish 'Psychie' was here 
to watch them — Lake Forest home at 
classes! Where's Fat, I want to yell 
— L-A-K-E!" 

"O — come on Jen — you forget you 
come from a dead school — we gotta 
go home to classes!" 

One of our contribs says with Btllie 
Shakespeare — 

"All things that are, are with more 
spirit chased than enjoyed" — 

A date for Co. B.'s ball — 

A home run from the station — 

A breathless scramble into glad 
rags all for a dancing lesson — 

A straight program — and 

No punch. 

Speaking of frosh — one of our 
wisest sophs, informed Prof. Sibley 
that Macaulay was a democrat. 

Get busy freshman girls — don't 
forget those speeches you have to 
have for New Girls' dinner! 

Frosh girl at telephone — 4 A. M. 
Monday — with a forty horse power 
treble E voice — ■ 

"Oh! rah! rah! we've got his goat! 
Oh! I'm coming right home — Oh-Oh- 
Oh!" 

Rest of L. D. H. in concert, "Why 
don't the darn Germans make peace 
in the day-time?" 



Personals 



Mrs. Blumenberg spent Monday here 
the guest of her daughter Ruth. 

Virginia Phillips was the dinner 
guest of Dorothy Antrim Monday even- 
ing. 

Mrs. John M. Clapp was the guest of 
Miss Powell recently. 

Burglars or Window Climbers ! Has 
the book store missed anything of late? 
It might be well to keep the windows 
closed. 

Leon McFerran, '18, is on the campus, 
and expects to stay about a week. 

Elaine Kellogg and Gladys Reichert 
spent the week-end in Chicago. 

Beth Thayer, Vera Pettigrew and 
Edith Wise spent Monday in Chicago. 

Virginia Virchow of Aurora visited 
Sarah Moore over the week-end. 

Virginia Philips spent the week- 
end with Josephine Martin. 

The Misses Clinch and Zearing vis- 
ited Beatrice Worthley over the 
week-end and attended the dance 
Saturday night. 

Miss Vernietta Scott visited Helen 
Hoyer over the week-end. 

Miss Lottie Thompson of the Three 
Arts Club, Chicago, visited her cousin 
Josephine Martin over the week-end. 

Helen Barnthouse spent Monday in 
the city with Mildred Gerlach. 

Eleanor Goble, Hazel Sequin, Mar- 
garet Horton, Anne Sillar and Ruth 
Kenyon went to Chicago Monday. 

Margaret Horton spent the week- 
end visiting friends at Harvey. 

Delia Babcock visited Sigma Tau Sat- 
urday and Sunday. 

We now have two new girls in Lois 
Durand Hall. Zelma and Irene Farwell 
from Channing, Texas, arrived Monday 
noon. Zelma is a Sophomore and Irene 
a Freshman. We hope they like the 
north and Lake Forest. 

Marion Preston spent last week- 
end with friends at Lois Hall. 



Just before going to press we re- 
ceived a communication from Boston. 
Expecting at least a two dollar 
($2.00) subscription we were delight- 
ed to find a touching appeal that we 
substitute "cw" for "qu" and "cs" 
for "x". All right — here goes — 

"Cwoth an ecscwisite cwack of 
cweer cwality and cwaint cwalms, 
'Necst let us ecspurgate the 'cs' and 
thus ecsterminate all ecstra letters 
from our ecsruciating ecsursive 
language," 

"Ecsuse us," quoth we. 



Pass in Review 

Regarding Mr. Brisbin, soon to be 
conductor of the band, Sergeant 
Crawford was recently heard to re- 
mark, "Yes, I'm going to have an 
assistant next week." We really did- 
n't think he'd admit he needed one. 

For Professor of Tautology in this 
institution, we nominate Charley 
White, the well-known lightweight 
boxer. He made the following an- 
nouncement at the boxing matches at 
Fort Sheridan: "Our next contest 
will be between Co. A versus Co. B. 

Fat, have you found out yet wheth- 
er our Siberian waffle hound is a mas- 
cot or not? 

Add "saddest words of tongue or 
pen" — "Classes and drill as usual" 
on the day the armistice was signed. 

Many inquiries have been made 
concerning the uniform of the piano 
player at the celebration dance. Some 
have said it was that of the Feder- 
ation of Musicians; this report was 
officially denied. He belonged to the 
Plumbers' Union. 

It remained for Custer to show us 
the latest thing in sanitary and airy 
night gowns as they are all the vogue 
in Logansport. 

Ned, reading report of the Kaiser's 
abdication to Holland, "I see the 
Kaiser is in Dutch.'' 



Our New Faculty 

Lake Forest college is very fortu- 
nate this year in securing Professor 
Alfred Gould as assistant in the Ro- 
mance Language Department. Pro- 
fessor Gould was educated in France 
and Italy both in Romance Languages 
and Architecture. Mr. Gould has 
taken part in the construction of 
several bank buildings in Europe. 
Desiring to give our government the 
benefit of his wide knowledge of 
languages he returned to this country 
and is doing his best to make our 
S. A. T. C. men thoroughly acquaint- 
ed with these languages. 

Mr. Kurzin, Professor McNeil's new 
assistant in Mathematics, comes to us 
well recommended. He received his 
B. A. degree from the University of 
Chicago in 1914, and the following year 
his M. S. degree. After that he worked 
in a chemical laboratory for one year. 
For the last two years he has taught 
Physics, Mathematics and Chemistry in 
the MeKinley High School in Honolulu. 



26 



THE STENTOR 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN W WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



use BOWMAN'S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 

BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-1C9 Vine Ave" 



Alumni Notes 

1885. Frederic M. Stephenson, who 
died in the West in September, was a 
student here for two years, being grad- 
uated at Wisconsin later. Possessed of 
ample means, he. was a wide traveler, 
a mighty hunter, and a delightful per- 
sonality. 

1903. The present address of Mrs. 
G'ae Myers Seeley is 5012 Glenwood Ave., 
Chicago. 

1908. L. D. Callahan, after some 
months in service, has entered the prep- 
aratory school for paymaster at the 
Naval Training Camp, Navy Yard, Puget 
Sound, Washington. 

1911. Paul M. Bruner of Rock Island, 
a student here for something more than 
a year, died recently at Des Moines, 
Iowa, of pneumonia. Since leaving col- 
lege he has been most of the time in 
newspaper work, for which he showed a 
bent while here, first on the Rock Island 
Argus and latterly on the Des Moines 
Capital. He leaves a widow. 

As to his work, we cannot do better 
than quote a paragraph from the notice 
of his death in the Argus. "Mr. Bruner 
was an exceptionally forceful writer, 
possessing a rare faculty of expression. 
A close observer, a student of human 
nature and having a keen wit, he was 
singularly well equipped for newspaper 
work, especially special assignment un- 
dertakings. This he did to some extent 
with The Argus and more generally for 
newspapers with which he was subse- 
quently employed. In Des Moines he 
handled what is known to the craft as 
'big news,' that pertaining to state and 
legislative affairs. Without doubt he 
was well on his way to a place among 
the„ -leaders in :the profession when 
fatally stricken." 



1915. We quote from a letter from 
Milo S. Gibbs (Hdqts. S.O.S. A.P.O. 717, 
A.E.F. ) a bit of compliment for Lake 
Forest, especially as showing how the 
men in France hark back to familiar 
scenes at home. "The last time I saw 
Robineau ('08) we were, as usual, 
speaking of Lake Forest, and he quite 
expressed my ideas when he said that 
regardless of the other institutions he 
had attended, there was no place that 
had the attraction for him, and there 
was no place that symbolized so much 
joy for him, as Lake Forest." 

1910. Miss Eunice LeVien is teach- 
ing Biology in the high school at LeRoy, 
111. 

1916. Miss Hazel Sloan, who has 
been in the employ of the Gregg Pub- 
lishing Co., 77 Madison Ave., New York 
City, for some months, is now private 
secretary to the head of the firm. 

1916. Charles M. Stuart, who went to 
Russia about two years ago to work in 
the organization in Petrograd of a 



C.G.Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 
Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



gTT $65.00 takes my $250.00 

^Jl size phonograph, one diamond, 
■J* one sapphire point needle, and 200 
steel needles and records. All new- 
used two weeks. Act quick. 317 Greenleaf 
Ave., Wilmette. 

200 ft. from Linden Sta. Mil. Elec. 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

DEALER IN 

Gen/s ' Furnishings 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



FRANK BULOW 

Barber 

Under Jensen's Shoe Store 

RAILROAD TICKETS 



Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSEP. Prop. 
Phone 1 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



C. T. Gunn Co. 

Grocers 

Agency Huyler's Candies 

Curtice Bros. Goods LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD. Prop. 
Phone 175 

Whs? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 
O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



17" FT BUT C1Z""V Successor to 

J\.U£>llL.OJ\. I Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 

For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



27 



ima 



We take orders for 
OfHcers' Made- 
to-Measure 
Uniforms in 
O. D. Serge, 
Gabardines, 
and Whipcords 



Uniforms 



Shofs 



Hats 



CHARLES GLASS 

All Military Furnishings 

are lower in price here 
than anywhere else. 



Telephone 1216 HIGHWOOD, ILLINOIS 



Q 



The V^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Telephone 1071 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllBII 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



branch of the National City Bank of 
New York, after exciting and perilous 
experiences, of which we hope to give 
a report some time, at last accounts 
had safely reached Copenhagen. 

1917. John M. Hawea is located at 
Camp Syracuse, N. Y., on special duty 
at Battalion headquarters. His further 
denomination is 4th Co., 1st Extension 
Bu. 

1917. Married at Jacksonville, 
Florida, August 24, Doris Merner and 
Lieut. Cyrus P. Trowbridge. Lieut. 
Trowbridge is . now oversees and Mrs. 
Trowbridge at her home in Cedar Falls, 
Iowa. 

1918. Margaret Schwittay is teach- 
ing this year at Glen Ellyn, 111. 

1919. George F. Moulton, who has 
been in Washington for some time in 
the Chemical Service Section, was com- 
missioned Oct. 5, Second Lieut. C. W. S. 
and put in charge of procurement, in- 
spection, and receiving of ordnance. He 
is denominated on Ordnance Officer Re- 
search Division. We have already re- 
ported his marriage in May to Miss Rita 
Barnard of Ottawa. His home address in 
Washington is 3600 Ordway St., N. W. 

1919. Donald S. Woods, business 
manager of the Stentor last year, is 
now at the R. 0. T. C, Municipal Pier, 
Chicago. 

1920. Horace Horton who is in the S. 
A. T. C. at Wisconsin University, has 
been recommended for the R. O. T. C. 

The latest reports from the Winnetka 
Sanitarium indicate that Dr. Halsey is 
still improving. 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 
GO TO 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 



/. B. Veselsfcy 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



m The 

Sheridan Cafe 

MARIAN H. CRAIG 

Two Good Places to Eat 
HOMEawJHERE 

10 N. Sheridan Road 
HIGHLAND PARK :: ILL. 



■Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

fy For Light 

f W7 C For Heat 

UWl) For Power 

North Shore Gas Co 

mil 



S. Fell 

MILITARY GOODS AT 
LOW PRICES 

STETSON ARMY HATS 



13 S. St. Johns Avenue 
Highland Park, Hi 



K_o_da_K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



Dr.C.W. Young Dr. R.O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00p.m. to 

12:C0 m. 5:00 p. m. , . 

Lake Forest Illinois 



L. Greenberg 

ELECTRIC SHOE REPAIRING 

SHOP 

55 Deerpath Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILL 



28 



THE STENTOR 



■illlllillllilllllllllll 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



■line 



HII 



at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Always offers a liberal training under experienced professors and excellent provision for 
tne pkusical and social welfare of its students, in a beautiful environment. 

THE S. A. T. C. 

As is now well known, units of tke Students Arinu Training Corps are maintained at 
manu colleges, to wkicn are admitted graduates of nign schools or tnose offering an equi- 
valent preparation. Suck men are inducted into tke Armu and given suksistance, pau of 
$30 per month, and both military and collegiate instruction. Tke unit at Lake Forest is 
limited to akout 200 men, and experience kas already proved tkat tke conditions kere 
are most favorable in tke wau of kousing, mess-kail, drill-ground and direction. As a num- 
ber of tke present quota are likelu to be promoted to an Officers' Training Camp in 
December, tkere will be places available for new-comers about January 1. 



Under tke same government as tke College, kut witk separate buildings and faculties are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY 

A preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858- 

FERRY HALL 

A school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

With an independent organization, offering superior advantages. 

For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, III. 



JENSEN &SUNDM ARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 
Tickets 

DD 



7 MARKET SQUARE 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing ■ Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning and Pressing . . $1 50 

Pressing . . . . ' .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



—J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m- 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ana 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



j. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Co. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



a 






Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, November 2 2, 1918. 



VOLUME 5. 



War Work Drive 
Ends 

The United War Work drive ended 
last Wednesday. L. F. C. had no 
definite quota so we don't know 
whether we went over the top or not. 
Appearances, however, indicate not. 
The total amount raised by students 
and faculty was $900. Of this amount 
the student body contributed $725. 
Of course a number of people made 
their contributions in other places, 
but, even so, Lake Forest does not 
shine in comparison with other col- 
leges. Knox, for instance, pledged 
over $4,000 in the first days of the 
campaign. At that college not a sin- 
gle member of the faculty or student 
body failed to contribute. The girl 
students each pledged over $10. 
Many of the enlisted men gave more 
than that sum. The enlisted men of 
L. F. C. gave in an average about $5 
apiece. In Lois Durand Hall there 
was much class rivalry. The senior 
girls came out ahead with an average 
of $7.00 per girl. The freshman girls 
raised the largest sum — their sub- 
scriptions amounting to $145.50. 



Convocation 

Announcement 

Be it here unto announced and cer- 
tified that there do exist and flourish 
upon the campus a duly ordained and 
constituted brotherhood of the most 
holy and righteous creed of the long 
lost but reincarnated moral teachings 
of the distorted ethics of Robinson 
Crusoe. 

The famous voyager himself re- 
turned to the island last week in the 
person of Lloyd F. Bechtel, with his 
most obedient slave and attendant, 
Dook S. Hiscox and took into their 
brotherhood Ignatius Oswald Cham- 
berlain with Sumner, Ligner and 
Speidel in view as pledges. 

Each man pledges himself to sub- 
mit a sum of $5 to have no asso- 
ciation with any Lois Hall denizen 
until after Christmas. Main object 
being to avoid buying Christmas pre- 
sents. 



Guiomar Novaes 
Plays in 

Lake Forest 

Last Saturday a most unusual treat 
was provided for every one in Lake 
Forest. The first of the Subscription 
Concerts given under the auspices of 
the University School of Music was 
held in the Art Institute. The pro- 
gram was a recital given by Mile. 
Guiomar Novaes, the young Brazilian 
pianist. From her entrance until 
the final encore number she held a 
sympathetic audience completely un- 
der the sway of her wonderful art. 
Mile. Novaes, although only twenty- 
two years old, has achieved a success 
attained by few living pianists. Her 
technique is perfect and in sympathy 
and power of expression she has sel- 
dom been equalled. The Institute 
has never held a more enthusiastic 
audience, nor a performer more 
worthy of applause. 

The next concert will be given on 
Saturday evening, February 1st, at 
the First Presbyterian Church. It 
will be an organ recital by Joseph 
Bonnet, organist of the Church of St. 
Eustache, Paris. Part of Mr. Bon- 
net's income from this concert will 
be given to French War relief ac- 
tivities. 



"Beg Your Pardon" 

Last week our inspired head line 
artist announced that "Study Hall 
was for Flunks Only." This it seems 
was startling but not true. Other- 
wise it was a very good head. Study 
Hall has not been discontinued. A 
small percentage of the men who are 
doing very good work are excused 
from regular attendance at the even- 
ing session of Study Hall. But with 
the exception of these few, Study 
Hall is held as usual — with the addi- 
tion of extra hours during the day for 
all whose work is not quite up to the 
standard. 



Mildred Gerlach spent the week 
end at her home in Chicago. 



54 Men 
Disappointed 

Fifty-four applicants for individual 
induction into the Lake Forest S.A. 
T.C. unit were disappointed Sunday 
night when it was ajnnounced by 
Lieutenant Axelrod that telegram 
had been received from the Commit- 
tee on Education stating that no 
more men were to be inducted into 
the Students Army Training Corps. 
This official action was the final re- 
sult of an order by the President 
halting temporarily induction into all 
branches of the service. It means 
that the War Department has decided 
permanently to induct no more men 
into this branch. The work of the 
men already inducted will go on as 
planned, probably until July 1, 1919, 
upon which the government contract 
with Lake Forest University expires. 

Most of the new men left immedi- 
ately upon the publication of this or- 
der. We hated to see them go. 
There were some fine fellows among 
them. And the worst feature of the 
whole thing is the disappointment 
for them. For the men who are left, 
things will probably go back to the 
same state as before the last recruit- 
ing campaign. Best of all, we may 
perhaps have our company rooms 
again. 

We now have on the south campus 
138 soldiers, 2 sailors, and ten or 
fifteen men not in the service who are 
continuing school. This is a suffi- 
cient number to "carry on," and with 
them we may make of this a success- 
ful year. 



Death of Mrs. Huhnke 

In an automobile accident on Sun- 
day, November 17, Mrs. John 
Huhnke, the wife of the Superinten- 
dent of Buildings and Grounds, was 
fatally injured. The Huhnke's have 
lived on the campus only a short 
time, but they are well liked and re- 
spected. The faculty and student 
body sympathize deeply with the fam- 
ily in their grief. 



30 



THE STENTOR 



Pass in Review 

There are certain moments in 
every woman's life wherein she must 
make a choice on which may depend 
most of her future happiness. The 
girls of Lois Durand Hall are now 
facing such a problem. They have 
been asked to choose between the 
good will of Gob Speidel and that of 
the faculty. Think it out carefully, 
girls, and take into consideration all 
that your decision may mean, but 
don't let the new uniform influence 
you. 



Ned, on a rainy afternoon in sur- 
veying, "When do they sound taps?" 



There was a young girl called 

Lorraine, 
Who "frequented" the Hotel 
Moraine, 
But conjecture I might, 
Since one Saturday night, 
You won't hear she's been there 
again. 



K. P. (in response to complaints 
about the fish at breakfast) "What's 
wrong with the fish?" 

Mudge: "It's dead." 



Ye scribe asked Framberg if he 
had any hot stuff for this column. 
"Yes," he replied, "I've got a good 
parody on 'Liza Jane.' " "Let's have 
it," said we. It follows: 

Hirschy's got a gal who's not 
so sweet, 

Lil Liza Jane, 

But Hirschy thinks she's all 
right 

Lil Liza Jane. 

Of course, the charm of the above 
poem lies not in the rhythm or the 
rhyme; it's all in the funny way Bob 
pulled it off which humble we would 
never try to reproduce. You really 
ought to hear him do it. 



For one of the star lecturers in 
our School of Tautology we nominate 
Dr. Raymond, who in War Aims said, 
"Then the little, petty, kinglets came 
scurrying back again." 



Framberg, our star reporter also 
handed in this one: 

"Rice, do you know any jokes for 
the Stentor?" 

"Speaking of jokes, that makes me 
think." 

To which Bob replied, "That cer- 
tainly shows the power of jokes." 

We are considering handing over 
this column to Framberg. He cer- 
tainly pulls subtle, but snappy stuff. 



Faculty News 

We are very happy to learn that 
Dr. Halsey is slowly but surely re- 
covering his health. He is at the 
Northshore sanitarium at Winnetka 
yet, but is able to leave his room fre- 
quently and those who have been per- 
mitted to see him, report that he is 
as keen and alert as ever. 

Few people could have been missed 
as sorely as has Dr. Halsey this year. 
He has served the college most ably 
for more than a quarter of a century. 
It is the sincere hope of all Lake 
Forest alumni and students that Dr. 
Halsey will resume next year his ac- 
tive duties as a member of the fac- 
ulty. 

Professor and Mrs. Burnap have 
returned to the campus for a short 
time. The first of December they 
plan to leave for California where 
they will spend the winter. 

Mr. Burnap reports good crops in 
Michigan, but we are very sorry to 
announce that the "Bureau" fell in 
the class of the government's "non- 
essential enterprises" and therefore 
is no more. 

We are looking forward to Mr. 
Burnap's return next year to the His- 
tory Department and also to a re- 
established matrimonial bureau. 



11 



"Moulin Rouge 
in North Hall 



Last Monday afternoon the Faculty 
and Students of the University School 
of Music entertained Miss Hamilton 
and the girls of Lois Durand most de- 
lightfully. The invitations were for 
an "informal tea in the Latin Quar- 
ter." When the guests arrived they 
were greeted by a charming gypsy 
who took them house-hunting. Af- 
ter all the rooms had been inspected 
and admired, the girls were taken to 
a real honest-to-goodness Cabaret. 
Here the atmosphere was decidedly 
Bohemian, and the refreshments were 
most dangerous looking. Stuff in 
bottles, and real cigarettes! ! Also 
delicious sandwiches and macaroons. 
While everyone was enjoying the 
food a clever little program was 
given by some of the Music School 
girls. Informal dancing followed and 
the Lois Hall girls expressed their 
appreciation but feebly when they de- 
clared they never had spent a more 
enjoyable afternoon. 



Social Hour at 
Lois Hall 

On Sunday afternoon, Nov. 17, the 
senior girls of Lois Durand Hall en- 
tertained informally at a tea. The 
establishment of a social hour of this 
kind has been under serious consid- 
eration for sometime, although defin- 
ite plans did not materialize until 
late in the day. Several members of 
the faculty were present and every- 
one thoroughly enjoyed and appre- 
ciated the music by members of the 
North Hall faculty. We hope to 
have frequent gatherings like this 
during the year. 



Famous Commands 
No. 1 
Da vies Rees (after a particularly 
varied and palatable meal) "Rice!" 



If Milwaukee is German 

Is Virginia Wales? 

When chapel starts 

Is Beth Thayer? 

When "spuds" are dear 

Is Edith Wise? 

If Francis (has) Liddle 

Has Sarah More? 

If William's a Wildeman, 

And Raymond A. Hunn 

Can John B. Noble? 

If Henry's Young 

Is Harry Younger? 

If Gordon's Sum(n)er 

Is Katherine Winter (s) ? 

If William's Liddle 

Is Gilbert Large? 

If psychology is deep 

Is Anna Glenn? 

How tragic — Can 

Rhoda B. Gray, 

Eloise Brown, 

And Joseph Black? 



The Armistice has not yet been 
signed between conservation and 
waste. And it never will be. 



S.A.T.C. PRAYER. 
Now I lay me down to sleep, 
I pray the Lord my soul to keep, 
And grant, Lord, that no cut-up take 
My shoes and socks before I wake. 

Amen. 



Without conservation in the past, 
we might not be celebrating today. 

Without conservation today we 
may not be celebrating tomorrow. 



Men will win the War — ships will 
win the War — food will win the War 
— labor will win the War — conser- 
vaton will win the War — well, they 
did! 



The War is won. The German 
goose-step has given way to the Foch 
trot, and everybody's happy. 



THE STENTOR 



31 




THE College Library is no longer 
merely the abode of musty 
books and an occasional grind 
— or a date looking for a quiet and 
secluded spot. Indeed no, a very dif- 
ferent atmosphere pervades the place. 
From the hour of opening until 
Miss Powell collects the last fine and 
turns the key 'in the lock at night, 
there is a lively scramble and much 
competition for a place where the 
weary student can sit him down and 
study. Long lines stand awaiting a 
turn at the newspaper table where 
they hastily scan the headlines and 
are pushed on to give the next man a 



REID MEMORIAL, LIBRARY 

chance — An intense and desperate 
air of study seems to enshroud all 
those who sit around the library 
tables deeply buried in piles of heavy 
volumes. 

And upstairs! Do we see only pile 
upon pile of undisturbed magazines 
and walls lined with back issues of 
Stentor and Forester or the last re- 
port prom the Agricultural Depart- 
ment? Indeed not. Here also the 
fiendish desire to accomplish much 
study as quickly as possible seems to 
have seized everyone. Here we see 
the dilatory student who has not 
made the best use of his hours in 



Study Hall serving his sentence at 
study in the Library — Here also we 
accasionally find an atmosphere of 
gloom — as the case may be. 

And even the girls of Lois Durand 
Hall seem to have developed a strange 
fondness for spending many hours at 
the library. Maybe the spirit is 
catching — maybe they need the study 
and in addition they realize that need 
— or maybe — oh, well, we hate to 
conjecture just what the reason 
might be — at any rate — the library 
is a lively place and that is as it 
should be. 



Army Equipment 
Issued 

Hats, belts, gloves, leggings, un- 
derwear, socks, and barracks bags 
were issued Monday. At that time 
shoes and the rest of the uniforms, 
as well as rifles were on the way. 
Probably by the time this Stentor is 
published, all the equipment will 
have been issued and the Lake For- 
est unit will be completely under 
way weeks before that of any other 
school in this part of the country. 
AVhich is a further reason for being 
glad that we are here and not else- 
where. 



Phi Pi Epsilon announces the 
pledging of Norman Lillis, Loveridge 
Martin, and Myron Thayer. 



Dr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Entertain 

Last Thursday afternoon, from 
four thirty until six, Dr. and Mrs. 
Thomas were at home to Dr. 
Thomas's Biblical Literature Classes. 

The house was beautifully lighted 
by candles. Dainty refreshments 
were served at five o'clock and a 
most delightful time was enjoyed by 
all the girls present. 



A needle and thread will double 
the life of your clothing — IF USED. 



Conservation made the world safe 
for democracy — and it's still on the 
job. 



Ruth Kenyon entertained Cather- 
ine Barnes of Northwestern Univer- 
sity several days this week. 

Eloise Brown is ill with grippe. 

Katherine Horton and Helen Thay- 
er spent Saturday in Chicago. 

Ruth Kennedy spent the week end 
in Chicago. 

Marie Sedgwick visited Theta Psi 
over the week end. 

Ruth Bahlert and Lois Ryno spent 
Saturday in Chicago. 

Lillian Stephens spent the week 
end in Chicago, the guest of her 
brother. 

Hazel Segiun entertained her cous- 
in Faye Cleghorn at Loise Hall on 
Monday. 

Ruth Stommel visited friends in 
Zion City, Sunday. 



32 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the collegiate 
year by the students of Lake Forest 
College. 
Board of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '19. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, "19. 

Ralph Stewart, '20. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers : 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Otis Chatfield-Taylor, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

James Crawford, '22. 

Howard Wood, '22. 

Prof. W. R. Bridgeman. 
Faculty and Alumni. 
Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



FOR we're all in the Army 
now!" That's the way one of 
our favorite marching songs 
ends. And it is the significant fact 
of our S.A.T.C. life. But there is 
another fact almost equally impor- 
tant, and that is that we are also in 
college. The latter has been difficult 
to realize and act upon, even for the 
old men, with a year or more of col- 
lege life to their credit. For the 
new men it must be doubly difficult. 

College life is a wonderful thing. 
It is half of the college training, 
which goes to develop men not only 
of brain, but of personality. The 
army has discovered that college men 
make the best officers. That is why 
we are here. Although now it ap- 
pears that we will never become of- 
ficers, we still need the well rounded 
training of college, which, as we have 
said, comes to a considerable extent 
from the associations, the ideals, the 
spirit, which make up college life. 

Now that the armistice has been 
signed, while we must keep our speci- 
fied work up to the highest point of 
efficiency, our thoughts invariably 
turn to the college side of our S.A. 
T.C. life. We begin to feel the need 
of College Spirit. 

Athletic teams and games with 
other colleges have always been con- 
sidered a prerequisite of college 



spirit. That is why we are having 
this football game tomorrow. That 
is why we are going to have a basket 
ball team this winter and a baseball 
team next spring. All of these ac- 
tivites need the undivided support of 
the entire student body. 

We trust that by this time every 
man has subscribed his dollar to the 
athletic fund. That is only one fifth 
of the amount every student has been 
required to pay in former years, 
when all the money came from home. 

Get behind this thing! You will 
get value received many times over 
for that dollar. But don't let it end 
there. Support the college in every 
way you can. Let your main athletic 
interest be, not the high school team, 
but the Varsity. Forget the high 
school stuff.^-you're all in college 
now. As your education and your 
opportunities have widened, so you 
must widen your point of view. The 
rest of your year here will be a dis- 
agreeable necessity or a long to be 
remembered pleasure, depending up- 
on the attitude you adopt. Let's 
pull together and make it a good 
year. 



YOU men of the S.A.T.C. prob- 
ably have a bit of regret mixed 
with your happiness, the regret 
of not having been there personally 
to see that things were properly 
wound up. It is certainly discour- 
aging to be all nerved up to rush 
down and capture a burglar, and ar- 
rive on the scene to find the police 
have him neatly shackled. However, 
there is no use in feeling useless these 
days, for the door of service, far from 
being labeled "Closed since Novem- 
ber 11", is wider open than ever. 

And not the least of the ways of 
service is conservation. 

Conservation? You know conser- 
vation. It used to be "Conserve to 
help win the War." Now it is "Con- 
serve to help pay the cost of Vic- 
tory." The need of it remains the 
same. For Uncle Sam, now that the 
War is over, cannot - sit peacefully 
back in his easy chair and take a well 
deserved rest. No. Now is the time 
above all others when he must not 
relax a moment. 

The expenses of war do not cease 
with the firing of the guns. The 
money must go now, not for destruc- 
tion, but for reconstruction. More 
than 120,000,000 men, women, and 
children of our Allies are now de- 
pendent wholly or in part on America 
for food to keep them alive. Uncle 
Sam must play dinner host to all of 
Europe — even to the latest guest — 



all-powerful and all-hungry Germany 
herself! 

Our army of 2,000,000 men in 
France has not magically dissolved at 
the first breath of peace. It is still 
in France, not fighting, hut working, 
guarding regained territory, help- 
ing in the great task of rebuilding a 
country ravaged and plundered by 
war. This army must still have the 
best that America can provide in the 
way of clothing, food and equipment, 
as must also the other army of over 
a million men in this country, men 
like yourselves who were willing to 
serve actively, but whose services 
were not required in that form. The 
nation is glad and eager to do all in 
its power to express its deep grati- 
tude. 

But the nation's expenses right 
now are going on at the rate of one 
and a half billions of dollars a month. 
Another Liberty Loan is looming on 
the horizon and taxes run merrily 
along, war or no war. Is it fair to 
impose any more than is absolutely 
necessary on your Government at this 
time of all times? 

Waste is one enemy that cannot 
be made to sign an armistice. It is 
fighting all the time, slyly, alertly, 
day and night, not in a spectacular 
manner, but quietly and insiduously. 
Every army camp and every S.A.T.C. 
camp in the country that does not 
take active arms against it had bet- 
ter demobilize at once. Uncle Sam 
may not need you to fight for him but 
he does need you to- save for him. 
Save food. Take what you need on 
your plate, and no more. The doc- 
trine of the clean plate is still fash- 
ionable. Save clothing by taking 
care of what you have. Needles, 
thread, shoe-brushes, soap and water 
may not be impressive weapons with 
which to fight, but they turn the 
trick. Save lights — turn 'em off 
when they are not in actual use. 
Save everything that you possibly 
can. 

No need of conservation now? 
More need than ever! 



Eleanor Goble and Ruth Kenyon 
spent the week end at their home in 
Elgin. 

Margaret Horton spent the week 
end with friends in Waukegan. 

Lillian Evans spent the week end 
at her home in Racine. 

Dorothy Cooper visited Theta Psi 
last Friday. 

Flora Shattuck visited friends in 
Evanston, Thursday. 



THE STENTOR 



Jen and Mary 

Gems of wit that fall like manna 
from the sky. 
Prof. Troutman (reading to his 
frosh) "Manna — now of course you 
all know what that is? It is what 
Christ fed the five thousand on." 
May we not offer that as a humble 
suggestion to Hoover? Save fish — 
serve manna. 



Do we smell a secret tragedy? 
Much burning of letters on the third 
floor — darkened rooms and stifled 
sobs! 



Enterprising dentists widen field of 
excruciation. Harriet E. Harris in- 
forms us that she went to a dentist 
and had her eyes tested. 



Lois Durn Hall, 
November 19, 1918. 
Dearest Henrietta Mae: 

I s'pose you will be kind of peeved 
because I haven't wrote to you soon- 
er but I am awful sorry but honest 
kid, how could I help it because 
these dinged professors always gives 
us so much to do and they get so 
mad when you don't get it all done 
and you have so much to do "n'every- 
thing." 

Well, I s'pose you are having a 
grand time n'everythings though they 
do say that Hick's corner is deader 
than chapel. 

This is sure one dandy school. 
Their is two hundred men and about 
fifty girls on the canvus. They have 
dances every Saturday night, just 
like they used to at the Odd Fellers 
hall only the kids ain't half so peppy 
— n'everything. Last week they had 
some kind of a concert — Guamar No- 
vay played but honest I would of 
rather heard Eliza Jones because 
this here lady couldn't do a thing 
with ragtime. They do say its kind 
of hard but you would of thot that 
for $1:50 she could of at least played 
something kinder new like "Sailing 
away on the Henry Clay" or "N' 
everything." 

Well, write soon — I got to close 
now they are ringing my bell. I 
guess I'll probably have to doll up 
or something. 

Well an revoore. 

Your Mamie. 

General Conservation's come to our 

camp to stay. 
To save our scraps, patch our clothes, 

and haul our junk away. 
I yearn to lead a wasteful life, but 

I don't dare, 'cause, gee! 
Old General Conservation's got his 

awful eye on me! 



Music School Notes 

Saturday evening, November the 
16th, the first subscription Concert 
was given by the young Brazilian 
pianist, Guiomar Novaes. 

Novaes appeared in concert when 
only nine years of age and because 
she showed such remarkable talent, 
was sent to the Paris Conservatoire. 
There she was the 3S8th candidate to 
enroll in the competition for the 
twelve available places. Novaes took 
first place among all the contestants 
and for two years she studied under 
Professor Philly. Just as she was 
returning to Europe, after a visit 
in Brazil the war broke out and in- 
stead she came to America. Here 
she has been received with the great- 
est enthusiasm. 

Novaes opened her concert with 
the Sonata Quasi Una Fantasia — op. 
2 7, No. 1 of Beethoven. Her play- 
ing was emotional and poetic and all 
through there was a feeling of rest- 
fulness and of mellowness. 

The four old Dutch songs gave her 
much chance for contrast — vigorous- 
ness, delicacy and poetry. The Noc- 
turne by Paderewski was especially 
lovely. 

Many different touches are possess- 
ed by this young and brilliant art- 
ist, each distinctly individual and 
each beautiful. Her interpretations 
bring us to realize how soft, gentle 
and rich music is. 



Wanted — Sewing and Dyeing. 
Room 20. 
15 cents up 
Question — How much down? 



Several of the Music School girls 
enjoyed the dance given by Company 
B at the Art Institute. The music 
was excellent and we all pronounced 
the evening a jolly one. 



The Music School has at last had 
the pleasure of welcoming its neigh- 
bors of Lois Hall in its own home. 
We have found them already the 
jolliest of comrades and we hope to 
see them in the Latin Quarter often. 



Mrs. C. M. Bivins, who has been 
visiting her daughter Charline for 
the past two weeks, has returned 
to her home in Lafayette, Ind. 



The Music School extends its deep- 
est sympathy to Mr. Huhnke in his 
bereavement. 



Annie Hintz Col-yum 

My dear Miss Hintz: 

I am a young lady twenty-two 
years old. I have a suitor who is 
twenty-three. He wants to marry 
me. Now he tells me that he is 
threatened with intelligence. What 
shall I do? 

Distractedly, 

Goldie. 
My dear Goldie: 

I advise you, to keep the young 
man as ignorant as possible else 
your chances of getting him are slim. 
Always, 
A. H. 
Dear Miss Hintz: 

I don't know what to do. My 
sweetheart does not write to me, yet 
I have heard that he is still interest- 
ed. Should I write to him? 
Sincerely, 

Hortense. 
Dear Hortense: 

By all means write tb him. Don't 
leave it to the men to make the ad- 
vances. Nowadays it's all up to the 
girls. If he still holds a big place in 
your heart let him know how much 
you think of him. Here's hoping he 
responds. 

A. H. 
Miss Hintz: 

I am a very popular girl, at least 
so they tell me. The other evening 
I had a chance for dates with four 
men. I knew not which one to take, 
having no preference. What would 
you have done in a case like that? 

Guiseppina. 
Guiseppina: 

I'd advise you to take one date for 
yourself. You might draw lots to 
see which one it will be. Then get 
dates for the remaining men with 
your girl friends. Pair them off as 
congenially as possible, and see that 
they all have a good time. This 
might be a solution to your problem. 

A. H. 
Dear Miss Hintz: 

Archie calls often. He says that 
time passes too quickly when he is 
with me. He also told me that my 
eyes were like two stars. Are these 
symtoms of true love, or is he spoof- 
ing me? Innocence. 
Innocence: 

Alas I fear your name fits you too 
well. Evidently, you are not ac- 
quainted with the ways of men. It's 
a hard world. I hate to shatter 
your idol but I must warn you that 
few men can be trusted. However, 
give Archie a chance. He may prove 
to be an exception. 

Sincerely, 

A. H. 



34 



THE STENTOR 



STYLES. THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



uslBOWMAN'S safe milk 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 

BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-109 Vine Ave- 



Alumni Notes 

18 93. Robert H. Crozier spent Sun- 
day Nov. 9 in calling on old friends 
in Lake Forest. He is still the gen- 
eral passenger agent ot the S.P. & S. 
R.R. at Portland, Oregon, his house 
address 243 Park St. He has been 
local secretary of the Red Cross or- 
ganization and is vice-president of 
the Portland University Club. Just 
now he is on vacation and will visit 
his brother David, '85, at his home 
in Germantown, Philadelphia. 
1898. Donald A. Kennedy is located 
in or near Portland, Oregon, in the 
lumber business. 

1907. Howard G. Rath went over to 
Prance Sept. 14, 1917, to join the 
American Field Service in any capa- 
city that should open. The follow- 
ing, a citation by General Pershing 
along with a recommendation for the 
Distinguished Service Medal, hints at 
his story. 

"Second Lieutenant Howard G. 
Rath, observer, 95th Aero Squad — 
For extraordinary heroism in action 
between Rhambley and Xannes, Sept. 
13. Lieutenant Rath, while acting 
as leading observer of a flight of 
three planes, was attacked by fifteen 
enemy planes. In spite of the fact 
that his formation was surrounded by 
an enemy five times as large, he car- 
ried out successfully his mission and 
bombed his objective. In the return 
running fight, Lieutenant Rath and 
his pilot continued the unequal fight 
and succeeded in returning to their 
airdome with valuable information. 
Home address: Walter F. Rath, 
brother, Pasadena, Cal." 
190 7. Lieut. Howard R. Shroyer's 
last available address was c/o Adams 
Express, 28 Rue 4 September, Paris. 



1908. Kingsley A. Burnell (home 
address 634 Cass St., Joliet) is ranked 
as lieutenant and assigned to spruce 
production service in Oregon. He is 
an engineer with wide experience, 
particularly in So. America. Address 
Portland, 243 Park St. 

190 8, 11. The present addresses of 
the Stone brothers are as follows: 

Louis H. 300, R.R.A. Portland, Or. 

William E. Milwaukee, Oregon. 

Elbert M. 1918 E. Davis St., Port- 
land, Oregon. 

1909. Mrs. R. E. (Lulu Crozier) 
Chamberlain has been living for some 
three years at 4 79 Virginia Park, 
Detroit, where her husband has an im- 
portant position with the Packard 
Motor Co. 

1915. Asst. Paymaster Stuart A. 
Bishop has had one dividend from an 
attack of influenza, in that he has had 
a week's furlough to his home in 
Sycamore. For about a year he has 
been in Washington in the Navy Al 
lotment Division of the Bureau of 
Supplies and Accounts, working on 
naval insurance. He now has hopes 
and prospects of being sent to sea 
shortly. His Washington address is 
1744 P. St. N.W., but his permanent 
address is Sycamore. 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



gTT $65.00 takes my $250.00 

^«J size phonograph, one diamond, 
— U one sapphire point needle, and 200 
steel needles and records. All new- 
used two weeks. Act quick. 317 Greenleaf 
Ave., Wilmette. 

200 ft. from Linden Sta. MM. Elec. 



FRANK BULOW 

Barber 

Under Jensen's Shoe Store 
RAILROAD TICKETS 



Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSEB, Prop. 
Phone 1 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



C. T. Gunn Co. 

Grocers 

Agency Huyler's Condi s 

Curtice Bros. Goods LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Whs? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



1TrT13T?T CFV Successor to 

.KUrj.E/l^OlV I Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



35 



IIIIIIIIHIlil 



lllll!!l!ll!!!!!l!l 



We take orders for 
Officers' Made- 
to-Measure 
Uniforms in 
O. D. Serge, 
Gabardines, 
and Whipcords 



Uniforms 



Shoes 



Hats 



CHARLES GLASS 

All Military Furnishings 

are lower in price here 
than anywhere else. 



Telephone 1216 HIGHWOOD, ILLINOIS 






Ulll!!l!!l!i!l!!!l!!ll!ll!!!llllllliilii!i!l!!li!iiii!UIUllUU!liUiilll 



■ 



The v^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



1915. Lloyd Potter, after spending 
1911-12 in college, was employed in 
Indianapolis for three years and in 
1915 went to Niagara Falls, N.Y., 
where he has been with the Carbor- 
undum Co. ever since. In October, 

1915, he married Miss Margaret Sul- 
livan of Indianapolis, and has two 
children. His Niagara Falls address 
is 1001 Willow Ave. 

1916. We are glad to be able to 
quote the following short extract from 
a letter sent to Rev. C. D. Erskine, 
'06, dated Aug. 18. Batcher left 
College, in a fit of "Wanderlust,"' at 
the end of his Junior year in 1915, 
and saw a lot of service with our 
fleet in Southern Waters before going 
across. 

"During the last few months I cer- 
tainly have had some time. I was 
with the marines when they made 
their stand in front of Paris, in June, 
but was unlucky and got in the way 
of a machine gun bullet, so lost out 
on the best part of the show. At 
present I am feeling fine and already 
to give the Boche another run for his 
hide. I am here only temporarily, 
so my address is the same as usual." 
Cpl. Harry W. Batcher, 
45th Co. 5, Reg. 4, 
U. S. M. C. American E. F. 

1916. Miss Ruth Talcott is teaching 
in the high school at Waterloo, Iowa. 
Address 317 Iowa St. 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 



/. B. Veselsky 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



^ The 

Sheridan Cafe 

MARIAN H. CRAIG 

Two Good Places to Eat 
HOME and HERE 

10 N. Sheridan Road 
HIGHLAND PARK :: ILL. 



/^y For Light 

i T /J Q For Heat 
KJ\A>*3 For Power 

North Shore Gas Co. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



S. Fell 

MILITARY GOODS AT 
LOW PRICES 

STETSON ARMY HATS 



f 



13 S. St. Johns Avenue 
Highland Park, HI 



K QDA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



Dr. C. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



L. Greenberg 

ELECTRIC SHOE REPAIRING 

SHOP 

55 Deerpath Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



36 



THE STENTOR 



l!!!l!l!l!llll!!!ll!llllllli|[lllllllll!lllllllin 



.■Milllilllllll 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Always offers a liberal training under experienced professors and excellent provision for 
the physical and social welfare of its students, in a beautiful environment. 

THE S. A. T. C. 

As is now well known, units of tne Students Arniu Training Corps are maintained at 
manu colleges, to which are admitted graduates of nigh schools or those offering an equi- 
valent preparation. Suck men are inducted into tke Armu and given subsistence, pau of 
$30 per montk, and kotk military and collegiate instruction. Tke unit at Lake Forest is 
limited to about 200 men, and experience kas akeadu proved tkat tke conditions kere 
are most favorable in tke wau of kousing, mess-kail, drill-ground and direction. As a num- 
ber of tke present quota are likelu to be promoted to an Officers' Training Camp in 
December, tkere will be places available for new-comers about January 1 . 



U Under tke same government as tke College, but witk separate buildings and faculties are 

| LAKE FOREST ACADEMY 

Hf A preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL 
A school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 
m THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

B With an independent organization, offering superior advantages. 

m For information about any department, address 

m PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

J LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, 111. 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 
Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 

C.G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing ■ Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning and Pressing . $1.50 

Pressing ... . . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



—J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m- 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Go. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, November 30, 1918. 



NUMBER 6. 



S. A. T. C. Demobilized 



Y. M. C. A. COLLEGE WINS THE 

FIRST GAME FROM 

LAKE FOREST 

We lost our first football game of 
the year — 20-0, but the score does 
not show anything about the game 
except that we were scored on three 
times. The things that the score does 
not show are, in the mind of the 
humble reporter, much more impor- 
tant — First, the mere score does not 
show how hard the team fought in 
the second half and held "Y" score- 
less in spite of the fact that several 
of our stars were hurt. From the 
score no idea can be had of the spirit 
the men showed in organizing a team 
with no coach or director of athletics. 
The absence of a coach explains the 
defeat, for we were beaten because 
the team was not sufficiently drilled 
in the fundamentals of defensive 
football. As all the old men know 
Coach Mather, whom we all want to 
see return, can well impart these to 
a team. 

There were very few details of the 
game itself that stand out. For Y. 
M. C. A. Hess was the star, and his 
plunges through our green line were 
largely responsible for our defeat. 
For Lake Forest, Rice Schlager, and 
Dougan fought hard and played well 
in the line, while Pratt played a fast 
and heady game at quarter-back. Y. 
M. C. A. must be given credit for 
playing a good clean, sportsmanlike 
game of football. 
The lineup follows: 

l,ake Forest Y.M.C.A. College 

Legner L. E James 



Mustering Out to 
Begin Dec. 2 

Official notice announcing immedi- 
ate demobilization of our S. A. T. C. 
unit was received Tuesday, Nov. 27. 
In chapel the next morning Dr. 
Wright read the telegram from the 
government headquarters which or- 
dered complete demobilization of all 
S. A. T. C. units in the country by 
December 21, the mustering out to 
begin December 2. 

The news was received with great 
enthusiasm by the men. Since the 
signing of the armistice early in Nov- 
ember the interest and application 
imong the S. A. T. C. has rapidly de- 
creased. 

The effect of military discipline on 
the campus has been very favorable 
but the military regime hardly coin- 
cides with the ideals of liberal study 
In peace times. ., 

Dr. Wright urged all the men to 
continue their work as usual until 
they are actually mustered out. He 
also urged that every student remain 
to complete the years work wherever 
possible. Nevertheless, it is certain 
that some men will not return after 
the Christmas vacation. We hope 
this number will be very small and 
that these places will be filled by for- 
mer students now free to continue 
their college work. 



Schlager . . . 


. L. T Soyster 


T. Hale . . . 


. L. G Rasmussen 


Jury 




A. Hale 


R. G Christensen 


Capt. Dougan 


. R. T Needham 




R. E Moyer 


Pratt 


. Q. B Johnson 


O'Neill .... 


L. H. B. Touchton.Capt. 


Hough 


R. H. B Passell 


Grertz 


F. B Hess 



Substitutions— 
ols for Legner, 
Hale, Framberg 
gomer'y for Rice, 



-Lake Forest: Nich- 
Beauchamp for T. 
for Dougan, Mont- 
Sumner for O'Neill, 



O'Neill for Giertz. Y.M.C.A. College: 
Carlburg for James, Forster for Need- 
ham. 

Touchdowns — Hess 2, Touchton. 

Goals from Touchdown, Christen- 
sen 2. Referee, Selby, Northwestern. 
Umpire Frieling, I.A.C. Head Lines- 
man, Bohrn. Municipal Pier. 



MRS IRA COUCH WOOD 

SPEAKS AT LOIS 

DURAND HALL 

Last Tuesday evening, Mrs. Ira 
Couch Wood of the Child Welfare De- 
partment of the Women's Council of 
Natural Defense addressed an appre- 
ciative audience in Lois Durand Hall. 

Mrs. Wood spoke of the reconstruc- 
tion work after the war, and parti- 
cularly of the great part that the 
women of America are to play in it. 
By drawing a very vivid picture of 
the wonderful work that the women 
of the allies and also of America 
have been doing "over there" she 
made us realize how small our "bit" 
has been and how much is left for us 
to do. 

Her charming personality added 
to her interesting speech made us all 
regret that she would not speak long- 
er. 

Y.M.C.A. Secretary 

Lake Forest College is soon to have 
a permanent Y. M. C. A. Secretary. 
Mr. Myers, a graduate of Ohio Wes- 
leyan College, who is now persuing 
Theological studies at Northwestern 
University has been appointed by the 
United War Work Council. He ex- 
pects to be on the ground every week 
end from Friday noon until Monday 
noon, and hopes to start classes in 
Bible Study and also to give the 
"World Outlook" course which is so 
popular this year in college. 

The Y. M. C. A. center will be in 
College Hall where a room in the 
south end of the building is now be- 
ing remodeled and furnished for this 
purpose. 



Thomas Bosworth and Martin May- 
eau were the guests of Warren 
Schreurs at the latter's home in High- 
land Park on Thanksgiving Day. 



38 



THE STENTOR 



Pep Meeting 

Well, we lost the game. But we 
won in another way which quite over- 
shadows the loss of the game. We 
succeeded in stirring up some real 
college spirit, and compared to that 
our 20-0 defeat is a small matter. 

On Thursday night before the game 
we had a pep meeting which recalled 
the scenes of other days. The frosh 
had constructed a scientific bonfire of 
fence posts, boxes, planks, arranged 
in a neat conical stack, capped by a 
jaunty barrel. When several gallons 
of kerosene were poured on and the 
match applied, the flames shot sky- 
ward, while the band marched up and 
around the fire, playing one of its 
snappiest marches. Then followed 
yells, for which not much could be 
said. The bunch couldn't get togeth- 
er, nor were most of the individuals 
doing anything. From the way most 
of the men saved their voices, one 
would have thought that they were 
grand opera stars to whom a bit of 
hoarseness meant the loss of a thou- 
sand dollar engagement. 

It took a good old snake-dance 
around the fire, followed by a circle 
formation, with speeches by Lieuten- 
ants Thompson and Sergeants Sum- 
ner and Dougan to break the ice. 
There followed some yells which 
showed that there was at least some 
hope for the aggregation. This hope, 
we believe, was justified at the game. 
The yelling there was very well or- 
ganized, considering the time that 
the bunch had worked together, and 
the hoarse whispers in which conver- 
sation at the Mess Hall was carried 
on for several meals afterward show- 
ed that individually every man had 
done his bit. The girls were there 
too, although not in full force, to add 
a lusty treble to the deep-throated 
roar of the men. While there is 
room for improvement with the com- 
ing of the basket ball season, we have 
every reason to be proud of this first 
exhibition of our concerted lung 
power. 

But to return to the pep meeting: 
There was more music by the band, 
followed by songs, ensample and 
quartette. Then more yells, getting 
better all the time. Finally, as a 
fitting climax, a crate of apples was 
opened, and after the ladies were 
served, the crate was placed upon the 
ground and a grand scramble ensued. 
In a few seconds nothing was left 
but a few splinters of the crate. The 
crowd dispersed, and our first pep 
meeting of the year was over. 



Friday Night Club 

Until a more appropriate and at- 
tractive name can be found for the 
new literary organization at Lois 
Durand Hall, it will be known as the 
Friday Night Club. Last Friday 
evening the second meeting of this 
club was held in the big room at 
7:30. At least forty girls were pre- 
sent to discuss the course of reading 
or study to be pursued. 

At the end of a preliminary discus- 
sion, the number was divided into 
two groups, the largest portion con- 
sisting of those who are most inter- 
ested in reading recent fiction and 
the remainder, of those who wish to 
study topics and problems of the' day. 
Wilde's "New Democracy" has been 
chosen as the book with which the 
study will begin. 

Temporary committees were elect- 
ed to make nominations for perman- 
ent officers and also to select an ap- 
propriate name. The club will meet 
every Friday evening from 7:30 until 
9 o'clock. 



The Phi Eta Alpha announces the 
initiation of: 

Arthur C. Hollatz 
Leonard E. Friebele 
George L. Watson 
Russel Charles Smith 
Fred M. Sheehan 

urtis C. Noble 
Victor Davis Thomas 
Wilmer I. Little 
Francis C. Liddle 
Harry Sweeger 
Elmer E. Vorbau 



The Phi Eta Alpha announces the 
pledging of: 

Harold Heffron 
Edgar Felton 
Gilbert Steffen 



Wednesday afternoon, Professor 
Sibley entertained the Senior English 
Class at his apartments in College 
Hall. After a short discussion of the 
lesson, the class looked at some very 
interesting pictures and books, while 
Mr. Sibley made tea. It was a most 
pleasant afternoon, and every one is 
hoping for another very cold day. 



Becky has enriched the treasury of 
the Robinson Crusoes by five bucks. 
He still retains his membership in 
spite of his fall from grace. 



University Club 
Meeting 

Thursday evening, November 21st, 
the University Club held its first 
meeting of the year in the Library. 
The meeting opened with a short 
business discussion in which a report 
was given by a committee on general 
plans for the coming year. Prof. 
Coffin, the club's president, then in- 
troduced acting President Wright 
who gave a very interesting paper on 
"Constructions of Culture." There is 
no one here better fitted to give such 
a paper than Dr. Wright, and the in- 
terest of the members of the club 
was keen until the very end. After 
the paper there was an open discus- 
sion in which several members gave 
their views or furthered the line of 
thought set forth by Dr. Wright. Be- 
side reading the paper Dr. and Mrs. 
Wright acted as hosts to the club, 
and after everyone who cared to had 
entered into the discussion the meet- 
ing broke up and a social evening 
followed. 

At the close of the evening every- 
one felt appreciation and indebted- 
ness both, to Dr. and Mrs. Wright 
for the way in which they had added 
to the enjoyment for that evening. 



S. A. T. C. Bulletin 

Hoover says "Keep on Conserv- 
ing"! Boobs say, "Aw, what's the 
use?" I'm for Hover. How about 
>ou? 

Remember, we've still got an army 
to support in France. The fruits of 
victory taste great, but they can't 
take the place of reliable old army 
beans. 

Konservation helped kill Kaiser- 
ism. Kontinued Konservation will 
help bury it once and for all. 

Save for France — France fought 
for you. 

Proper care and quick repair 

Stops the loss from wear and tear. 

GET THE DRIFT! 

There was once a lad who loved 

thrift, 
Who one day became rather miffed, 
When his pal called him tight, 
For he said, "That's not right, 
Conservation with me is a gift. 
The Hun, it is true, has been biffed, 
But there still are some burdens to 

lift, 
I've no chance to fight, 
So it's no more than right 
That I lift with this gift known as 

thrift." 



THE STENTOR 



39 



A Heatless Sunday 

And it came to pass that the maid- 
ens of Lois Durand Hall did waken 
one morning and did try in vain to 
turn on the steam to warm the cold- 
ness of their rooms. 

And lo! that morning the rooms 
did have exceeding cold atmosphere 
and the maidens did give many turns 
to their radiators but there came out 
only a hollow clanking of pipes and 
no heat. 

And some did utter lamentations 
and did think the man had forgotten 
to rise and turn the steam on Lois 
Durand Hall, and others did betake 
themselves back to bed where there 
was yet a seeming warmth, hoping 
that perhaps later on they could rise 
to find a warm room. 

But in vain did they hope for yet 
was it cold several hours later and 
only a faint warmness did issue from 
the radiator when one extended 
one's knees closely. 

So there was much shivering and 
sneezing as each and everyone did 
try to invent some method of keeping 
warm — yea, even, were there those 
who did go unto the church hoping 
that there the steam pipes would 
yield the longed-for heat. And such 
enterprising ones as did go were re- 
warded as is always he who doth at- 
tend the services of the church. Both 
were they comforted in spirit and in 
body and lo! did they come away 
saying, "Blessed is the church and he 
who goeth there unto." — yea, verily. 

And lo! when evening cometh yet 
is there no heat and those who were 
not already stiff with cold did begin 
to say that never would they last the 
time out until once more they could 
end their study and go to bed. 

Even the high Priestess of the 
Hall, the House President, did swathe 
herself in many blankets and did go 
about her duties shivering and not in 
good temper. 

And what more appropriate than 
should also fail unto them the light 
of the electricity and they were left 
in utter darkness. Even such as did 
have unto them dates in the recep- 
tion room. And these did thank the 
Providences for the darkness and did 
say it was a profitious indication. 
But soon came the menders and the 
damage was repaired and things con- 
tinued as before. 



Lieutenant Graham Sillais visited 
Digamma several days this week. He 
is an observer in the United States 
flying corps. 



Sophomore Dance 

The Sophomores gave us one of 
the happiest times of the year at 
their dance last Saturday evening. 
The music was especially good and 
more than made us frisk about. 

The Sophomores had a big sur- 
prise for us. Out in the rotunda 
small tables had been placed with 
room enough for four people. After 
each dance we gathered at these 
tables and ordered refreshments. To 
make it seem more like a cabaret 
Lorraine Maclay was featured in a 
charming solo dance. 

Dancing continued until eleven 
thirty and the entire affair was a 
huge success. 

Can you do as well when your turn 
comes to return the favor freshmen? 
Try it and see. 



Those Mondays 

No more is there a blue Monday in 
Lois Hall. You can't have the "Lazy 
Blues," or the "Livery Stable Blues" 
or any other variety of blues, because 
every Monday evening there is an 
entertainment for the express pur- 
pose of chasing away those blues. 

A week ago a noted jazz orchestra 
from Foundout entertained with sel- 
ections. Ukulelees, banjos and tin 
horns were featured. The orchestra 
have asked it to be announced that 
the red and green scarfs and other 
furnishings used on the horns were 
borrowed from Miss Margaret Mills. 

Last Monday all of the upper class 
men saw themselves as others see 
them. "Gee! it was a nawful sight!" 
But we'll have to hand it to the frosh 
for a side splitting entertainment. 

A big vaudeville attraction is an- 
nounced for next week. Watch our 
billboard. 



Tea Postponed 

The tea which was to have been 
given on Thursday afternoon, Nov- 
ember 21st, by Mrs. Crosby at her 
home here in Lake Forest, had to be 
indefinitely postponed owing to the 
death of the guest of honor's father. 
Deep sympathy is extended to Miss 
Laughlin by all the girls of Lois Dur- 
and Hall. We all hope that some 
other opportunity will come for her 
to be with us. Those who heard her 
two years ago know what a fascinat- 
ing speaker she is. 



Pass in Review 

We are afraid that this column is 
going to the dogs. Bob Framberg 
says he won't contribute any more be- 
cause we don't set forth his wheezes 
in a way to do them justice. We did 
our best and that's all we could do. 
Be reasonable, Bob, and help us out. 



Rodgers, in Study Hall, "Darn it, 
I've got to write an exposition about 
a stove." 

Us, "Well, you certainly have a 
red-hot subject." 



Famous Commands 
No. 2 

Davie Rees, in Study Hall — 'Wipe 
it off." 



The other day we snatched a ten 
dollar bill from out Bob Speidel's 
hand. "Give me that," said he, "I 
might forget you had it." This is 
the height of something or other, we 
know. 

Since the change in the time of 
reveille and the reduction of the 
dressing period in the morning, some 
ambitious rookies have been getting 
up ten minutes early to put on their 
breeches and puttees to say nothing 
of our featherweight dancing pumps, 
one or two of which someone always 
drops. In the style of our president, 
may we not suggest that for the 
greatest good of the greatest number, 
they leave them on over night? 



Framberg said he was insulted at 
inspection last Saturday. The lieu- 
tenant, looking over his hirsute ap- 
pendage said, "Shave a little closer 
next time." 



Writing this in study hall with 
Professor Allee continually walking 
around to see if we are studying is 
distracting to say the least. Now, 
that we have our Bolsheviki rifles, 
the ten minutes a day we used to 
spend writing this column is consum- 
ed in cleaning the darned things, so, 
at the recommendation of the above 
member of the faculty, we hereby call 
it a day's work. 

The reason for this decision was 
the remark of the Doctor who said, 
with deep sarcasm, "Is this study 
hall, or steady conversation?" 

Duke and Becky attended a dance 
at Chicago U. Saturday night, and in- 
cidentally saw our old friends Becker 
and Guler. All concerned were over- 
joyed at the meeting. 



40 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the collegiate 
year by the students of Lake Forest 
College. 
Board of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '19. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Ralph Stewart, '20. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Otis Chatfield-Taylor, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

James Crawford, '22. 

Howard Wood, '22. 

Prof. W. R. Bridgeman. 
Faculty and Alumni. 
Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



DURING the last three months 
there has developed on the 
campus two very large break* 
in the student body, which are not at 
all conducive to the best interests of 
the University. 

In the first place the military life 
has had a tendency to cause a breach 
between the men and women of the 
college in so far as the men are held 
strictly under military discipline 
which is quite contrary to the plan 
of previous years. On the other hand 
the Freshman class as a whole has 
shown an indifferent spirit towards 
the college and upper classmen, and 
there has been little or no co-oper- 
ation on their part. Now this is a 
condition unheard of in previous 
years, and although we are living un- 
der abnormal conditions this year, 
there is no reason why there should 
be any conflict whatever. As a mat- 
ter of fact, the very fact that there 
is chance for division and chaos 
should in itself be enough to draw 
the student body together more close- 
ly than ever before. The first break 
mentioned above is unavoidable in a 
large degree, but if the latter could 
be remedied, one feels positive that 
everything would run along much 
smoother than it does at the present 
time. The Freshmen got off easy in 
the "ragging" this year and have 



been put on their good behavior, so 
to speak, by the upper classmen. 
Evidently they have failed to appre- 
ciate this, and have taken advantage 
of the opportunity given them. 

The present conditions will be 
remedied only when the Freshmen 
take the proper attitude towards the 
upper classmen, consider them as 
their friends and advisors, as they 
really are; then and only then will 
we see the return of the proper col- 
lege spirit which we so much need to- 
carry us over the crisis of the present 
period, to a happier and better day 
for old Lake Forest. 



THERE have been surprisingly 
few misunderstandings and 
causes of friction in the change 
of Lake Forest College into a quasi- 
military post, but last week saw two 
of them which we believe require 
some notice and explanation. The 
main cause of the friction in both 
cases was misunderstanding as to the 
interpretation and scope of Military 
Law as practiced here by those in 
command. 

To the merely casual observer, the 
first of these misunderstandings 
seems to be founded on pure incon- 
sistency. The obvious facts of the 
case are as follows: Freshman rag- 
ging was carried on as usual this year 
until October 1st. Then, by order of 
Lieutenant Thompson, it was discon- 
tinued. Last week, the upper class- 
men had a meeting in which they 
were told that ragging should start 
up again, as Lieutenant Thompson 
had ordered it, and the Frosh have 
done a considerable amount of crab- 
bing and even shown slight tendency 
to rebel and try to overthrow the 
authority of the upper classmen. 
Now, the real reason for this appar- 
ent inconsistency is this: when the 
lieutenant called off the ragging he 
had the perfectly logical idea that it 
might interfere with the efficient pur- 
suit of military duties which before 
the signing of the armistice was the 
chief duty of all members of the S. 
A. T. C. Now that the armistice is 
signed, however, the War Depart- 
ment has signified by various com- 
munications that it desires the social 
and academic sides of college life to 
receive more attention. So with these 
communications before him, and with 
the knowledge that ragging is a great 
and good part of college life which a 
man remembers long after he obtains 
his sheepskin. Lieutenant Thompson 
has acted for the benefit of the great- 
est number, and we feel certain that 
in this, as in everything else he has 



done at Lake Forest he has the back- 
ing of every man in the Lake Forest 
S. A. T. C. who thinks for himself in 
the right way. 

The other affair was a double mis- 
understanding between the men in 
the Band and Lieutenant Thompson, 
and between the men in the Band and 
Sergeant Crawford, with the latter un- 
derlying the whole affair. The facts 
of this case are as follows: poor 
spirit was in evidence in the Band 
and several of the fellows thought 
something ought to be done about it. 
Therefore someone suggested sending 
a petition to Lieutenant Thompson 
for recognition of the services of the 
Band, as a method of ameliorating 
the "esprit de corps" of the 
aggregation, which organization 
they considered was useless 
with such spirit in evidence. 
Luckily, for unknown to the origi- 
nators of the petition it is a court 
martial offense to circulate a petition 
in the army, Lieutenant Thompson 
got hold of the petition before any- 
thing was done or any names affixed. 
He then called a meeting of the 
Band in which it transpired that the 
Band really didn't want extra privil- 
eges until they made good, but that 
they did want a better understanding 
between themselves and Sergeant 
Crawford. This result, we believe 
has now been obtained and the spirit 
of the Band is wonderfully inproved, 
and as a result they give better per- 
formances in public, and we feel sure 
will continue to do so if the student 
body keeps up in their support. 



After several days of strenuous 
work the Village Red Cross finished 
its quota of bandages. This depart- 
ment is now closed but the girls are 
urged to continue their regular hours 
of work. Refugee garments and 
clothes for the Belgian children are 
now being made. The need for these 
garments is urgent and every girl 
should spend as much time as pos- 
sible at the Red Cross Rooms. 



"Abie" is no more! He went to 
chapel as usual on Monday morning 
of this week and attended War Aims 
class Monday afternoon. Since then 
his whereabout has been a mystery, 
and even the best of our college de- 
tectives have been unable to follow 
up the clue. 

Well, it certainly was a shame to 
lose him so soon before Thanksgiv- 
ing, but at any rate, it has been wise- 
ly suggested that we have a memorial 
service for Abie at the proper time." 



THE STENTOR 



41 



Jen and Mary 

The following song of unanimous 
authorship we deem worthy to grace 
the freshman anthology. Can be 
sung to the tune of any very slow 
hymn — 
"The line-up, the line-up 

The democratic line-up 
Dates for dances, dates for dinner, 

Dates for any time. 
Fifty books all in a line 

Now which one will be mine? 
In the line-up, the line-up 

The all-sufficing line-up 
If you like your dear 

You are S. O. L. out here, 
For we all use the line-up now! 



Beth Thayer remarked in Bible 
Literature that the "Republicans 
were shocked at the teachings of 
John." She also mentioned the 
"Healing of the leopard." 



Once again we march bravely over 
to the Institute, hearts fluttering, 
knees trembling, to peer at those 
atrocities in grading. Once again, 
cold chills glide up and down our 
spinal columns as we view those 
stark 6 0's. Again, we slink back to 
our humble abode and solemnly swear 
to do better next month. Ah! 'tis a 
weary world and life is one deuced 
thing after another! 



Last Sunday night we sat draped in 
all our bedclothes, by the light of a 
sputtering candle and pondered over 
question of etiquette number 419 — 
should Sunday, November twenty- 
fourth be set down in history as 
lightless or heatless day? Can any- 
body settle the question? 

Old friends are always best — so we 
welcome to our midst the Moonlight 
Extra. Gee, gosh, ain't it grand? 



(Consolations to Tennyson.) 
Bangs, bangs, bangs, 

On thy milk white brows, O girls! 
And I would that my tongue could 
utter 

The loss I feel for your curls. 
O, well for the gay Jackey boy, 

That he flirts with a bold brunette. 
O, well for the soldier lad 

That he sings to a Theda Barette. 
But this old Gob goes on 

To his barracks over the hill 
And Oh, for the touch of a vanished 
curl! 

And the sight of a frizz that is nil! 
Bangs, bangs, bangs, 

On thy calcimined brows, I see 
But the tender grace of a cork-screw 
curl 

Will never come back to me. 



The Academy Game 

Saturday afternoon after the Col- 
lege game, the Academy football 
team fought against Culver for the 
championship of the middle west. It 
was a most exciting and well played 
game. The Culver team outweighed 
that of the Academy, but neverthe- 
less the Academy succeeded in scor- 
ing a touchdown during the early 
part of the game. The third quarter 
the Culver team scored a touch down 
and made a goal kick. The rest of 
the game was played close to the 
Academy goal, but Culver held the 
Academy. At one time, the Academy 
did carry the ball back of the line, 
but before it was placed back of the 
goal posts, the ball was dropped. 

On the whole the game was most 
exciting, and the crowd as enthusias- 
tic as any the Farwell Field has seen. 



Short Stops 

A Ford car driven by an employee 
of an Evanston electric supply house, 
which was bringing some new ma- 
chine parts to the power station here 
Sunday evening, struck a large stump 
near the station and was seriously 
damaged. The steering gear was 
wrecked and the front wheels were 
badly wrenched. 



John Dougherty was awakened 
from peaceful slumber in the Physics 
classroom several days ago to hear 
Professor Rendtorff say, "It is always 
the ass that doesn't know anything 
who never pays any attention." 

During recent examination in 
Physics one of the members of the 
class, who was fooling away time, 
was asked to hold a window shade 
that wouldn't stay down of its own 
accord. 



When the steam was turned on 
Sunday night after a day of freezing, 
Leslie Chapman awoke nearly smoth- 
ered and hurriedly removed the ex- 
cess clothing he had worn to bed. 



"Abie", the canine mascot of the 
S. A. T. C. barracks is now a pickled 
speciman in the biological laborator- 
ies. When Heinie Dorn heard of our 
bereavement he breathed a sigh of re- 
lief. 



Myron Thayer spent part of Mon- 
day in Chicago. 

Lucius Lobdell was in Chicago on 
business Monday. 



Annie Hintz Col-yum 

Miss Hintz: 

My sweetheart is in the navy He 
claims that he is true but he does 
not write as often as I wish he would 
What is the reason for it? Are 
jackies so busy or is he pulling a 
stall? 6 

Black Eyes. 
31ack Eyes: 

Undoubtedly your suitor is busy 
but there is no reason why he can't 
write oftener. I know of many cases 
where jackies find time to write every 
day. Have you no way of finding out 
whether he is true? He's probably 
having to divide his time for writing 
among many girls. 
Sincerely, 

Annie Hintz. 
Dear Miss Hintz: 

I recently met a young Lieutenant 
who is a nephew of an aunt of mine 
He is really no relation to me. I have 
fallen in love with him but I know 
he does not reciprocate. What shall 
I do to win his love? 

Gertie. 

Dear Gertie: 

Invite him over as much as pos- 
sible. Perhaps when you come to 
know him better, you won't fall for 
him so violently. That's the only 
solution I can offer. 
Yours 

Annie. 
Dear Annie: 

How long should a girl keep com- 
pany with a young man before he be 
allowed to put his arm around her? 
I have gone with Clarence for a half 
year now. Should he be allowed this 
privilege? How long after that be- 
fore I can allow him to kiss me? 

Speed. 
Speed: 

I'd advise you to go with a man a 
long time before you allow him to 
put his arm around you. Then wait 
till you know him a great deal bet- 
ter before he be allowed to kiss you. 
Sincerely, 

Anne. 
Dear Miss Hintz: 

Is it proper for a young man to 
rise when a girl enters the room? 
Some of the men do but the majority 
do not. 

Hortense. 
Hortense: 

It is the proper thing for a man 
to rise when a girl enters the room. 
However it's not being done around 
these parts at least I have seen few 
instances of it. 

As ever, 

Annie. 



42 



THE STENTOR 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



use BOWMAN'S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 

BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-109 Vine Ave. 



To A. B. 



Weep with me, all you that read 

This little story; 
And know, for whom a tear you shed, 

Death's self is sorry. 

'Twas little A. B., that so did thrive 

In grace and feature 
As companies A & B did strive 

Who owned the creature. 

Months he numbered scarce eleven, 

When fates turned cruel, 
And had been for weeks but seven, 

The campus jewel. 

When they for murderous purpose 
sought him, 
And did destroy, 
And so unto his doleful fate they 
brought him 
Our pride and joy! 

But oh, thou grisly scientist who 
bore him 

Into thy den, 
Beware lest vengeance fall upon thee, 

most base of men! 



Personals 



Mrs. John Wise of Preeport spent 
last week-end with her daughter 
Edith at Lois Durand Hall. 

Alice Douglas, Marjorie Etmyre 
and Jessie Carr visited Sigma Tau. 

Margaret Horton entertained her 
brother from Topeka, Kansas, last 
week-end. 



Perils in the Air 

In the last number we printed the 
official record of a citation for the 
distinguished service medal for Lieut. 
Howard G. Rath, in the 96th Aero 
Squadron. The following extract 
from a recent letter well shows the 
peril of the risks the men must take. 

"The first day of the St. Mihiel 
drive it was raining and the clouds 
were very low but still it was neces- 
sary to go out. You perhaps remem- 
ber my telling of another observer 
who went up to a French squadron 
with me last March. Well he and his 
pilot went out alone on the first mis- 
sion in a storm and never came back. 
They evidently ran into some Boche 
and were shot down as their plane 
was seen to fall out of the clouds and 
both of their bodies were found. 

A pilot and I were going to lead a 
flight off in the afternoon but the 
field was so muddy that we kept 
breaking propellers and couldn't get 
off. Finally some of them succeeded 
in getting off late in the afternoon 
but it was pitch dark before any of 
them came back and it certainly was 
a weird sight to see them flash by the 
lights. Looked like huge moths flut- 
tering around a candle. Several of 
them crashed in landing, one landed 
in a tree and neither of the passen- 
gers got hurt, but one fellow missed 



fTT $65.00 takes my 5250.00 

^j size phonograph, one diamond, 
j I one sapphire point needle, and 200 
-** steel needles and records. All new- 
used two weeks. A ct quick. 317 Gr.enleaf 
Ave., Wilmette. 

200 ft. from Linden Sta. Mil. Elec. 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Genfo ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



FRANK BULOW 

Barber 

Under Jensen's Shoe Store 
RAILROAD TICKETS 



Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSER. Prop. 
Phone 1 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



C. T. Gunn Co. 
Grocers 

Agency Huyler's CanJi s 

Curtice Bros. Goads LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



FnHlJI CTZ"V Successor to 

JVUrSHL-aJV I Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 666 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STBNTOR 



43 



EiiaHuhtd 1871 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 
73-75 W. South Water Street 

Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



Dr. C. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



/"^LASS Pins and Rings. 
^"^ Fraternity and Sorority 
Jewelry. Programs. 

CDCTCI DI>nC 27 E. MONROE ST. 

SFfclS BK<J&. CHICAGO 

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 



lllll!lli!!!l!ll!!lll!llllllllllllllllll!l!l 

/^y For Light 

t T /7 C For Heat 
Wt/fO p orPower 

North Shore Gas Co. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



S. Fell 

MILITARY GOODS AT 

LOW PRICES 
STETSON ARMY HATS 



f 



13 S. St. Johns Aoenue 
Highland Park, III 



the field entirely and crashed into 
the ground killing the pilot. I just 
missed being out on that flight. 

The next day we were ordered out 
to bomb troops at Chambley. Seven 
of us started out but only three of us 
could get off on account of broken 
propellers. My pilot and I were 
leading the formation. We couldn't 
get very high on account of the 
clouds and before we got to our ob- 
jective we could see some Boche div- 
ing down on us. We kept on but just 
before we dropped our bombs fifteen 
Boche jumped us and it was the 
worst light I have ever been in. We 
of course were out numbered 5 to 1 
and first one of our three planes went 
down, and just afterwards one of the 
Boche went down. They were riding 
right up alongside of us and it was 
something terrific and it began to 
look like the Government had taken 
an awful chance when they insured 
me for $10,000.00. It wasn't long 
until the second one of our planes 
went down and my pilot and I were 
left all alone. I thought we were 
goners for such for there were five 
of them still riding along with us 
and one fellow especially must have 
had four guns on his plane for a 
sheet of flame about four feet wide 
was pouring towards us from his 
guns. I was trying to keep them off 
with my guns and my pilot was man- 
euvering as much as he could and 
finally we got up to a cloud and dove 
into it. By the time we came out of 
the other side the Boche weren't as 
close as they had been and although 
three new fellows came at us, we got 
back across the lines safely. That 
was a pretty sad home coming for 
some of my best friends were in the 
other planes. 

A couple of days after that another 
pilot and I were leading a formation 
up at Longuyon and we were just 
coming over the town and I was get- 
ting ready to bomb when our engine 
broke down and we had to leave the 
formation. We of course were way 
back of the German lines and as we 
had a 50 mile wind against us, I ex- 
pected to land in Germany and at 
least be made a prisoner, but some- 
how my pilot got enough kick out of 
the engine to keep it poking along 
and finely we landed back of our 
lines. If any Boche had come up at 
us we wouldn't have had a chance. 

The next day the flight that was 
out ran into a big bunch of Boche 
and none of them came back. The 
next day about the same thing hap- 
pened to another quadron in pur 
group. My old pilot went down that 
day, in fact there are only three of 
us left of the old crowd." 



Chambers *^fi" 
Studio 



209 S. State St., Chicago 
Republic Bldg. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIID 

m The 

Sheridan Cafe 

; MARIAN H. CRAIG 

Two Good Places to Eat 
HOME and HERE 

10 N. Sheridan Road 
HIGHLAND PARK :: ILL. 



The Quality Tire Go 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsky 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson [Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision Dealers | 



Grocery . Market 

807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 
Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



L. Greeoberg 

ELECTRIC SHOE REPAIRING 

SHOP 

55 Deerpath Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILI . 



44 



THE STENTOR 



■!lll[||||||||IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!!l!fl!i:illllll!lll!» 

1 LAKE FOREST COLLEGE I 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS § 

M Always oners a liberal training under experienced processors and excellent provision ior H 
| trie physical and social welfare of its students, in a beautiful environment. 

THE S. A. T. C. | 

As is now well known, units of the Students Arrnu Training Corps are maintained at H 
m manu colleges, to wkicb are admitted graduates of bigb schools or those offering an ecrui- H 
valent preparation. Such men are inducted into the Arrnu and given subsistance, pau of j§ 
$30 per month, and both military and collegiate instruction. The unit at Lake Forest is H 
limited to about 200 men, and experience has already proved that the conditions here 
are most favorable in the way of housing, mess-hall, drill-ground and direction. As a nuni- 
H ber of the present quota are likely to be promoted to an Officers' Training Camp in 

December, there will be places available for new-comers about January 1 . j 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties are = 

( LAKE FOREST ACADEMY J 

A preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. | 

FERRY HALL | 
m A school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 
H THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

With an independent organization, offering superior advantages. 

jj For information about any department, address H 

■ PRESIDENT'S OFFICE m 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, 111. | 



JENSEN &SUNDM ARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 
Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 



GG.Wenban & Son 
Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning ■ Pressing ■ Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning and Pressing . . $1.50 

Pressing ....'. '.50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 

WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



'AMES MITCHELL 
The IEWELER 



} 



Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m- 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Co. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOKEST, ILI INOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, December 6, 1918. 



NUMBER 7. 



University Club 

Last Friday evening in Lois 
Durand Hall the University Club held 
its second meeting of the year. The 
club was very fortunate in having 
with it M. Seymour de Ricci, a dis- 
tinguished scholar and art critic, who 
gave an illustrated lecture entitled 
"Castles of the Loire." 

M. de Ricci is a member of the 
French Educational mission, and was 
formerly editor of "Art in Europe." 
His contributions to the history have 
been very valuable. M. de Ricci 
spoke most interestingly and the Uni- 
versity Club is greatly indebted to 
Professor Van Steenderen for secur- 
ing this brilliant speaker. 

After the lecture a short time was 
given to open discussion after which 
the meeting adjourned and a social 
hour followed. 



Remember Your U. W. W. 
Pledge 

Fifty percent of the money pledged 
by the Lake Forest College to the 
United War Work fund was due Dec- 
ember 1st. The men may make their 
payments to Mr. Richman, and the 
women to Miss Mamilton, or else the 
checks may be sent directly to Mr. 
James Forgan. 



Attention! 

In a week or two a number of you 
S. A. T. C. men are going to leave 
Lake Forest. Some of you will stay, 
we wish you all would, but, of course, 
that is impossible. The best way to 
keep in touch with L. F. C. after 
you leave is by continuing your sub- 
scription to the Stentor. Pay day is 
coming! Don't forget the seventy five 
cents you owe us, and while you are 
paying it, pay up for the year and 
save a quarter. Two dollars will pay 
your Stentor for the entire year. We 
will send it to you promptly, if you 
will do your part. Think what you'll 
miss if you don't subscribe! 



The Jazz Band 

One of the most notable social 
events of the season was featured in 
Lois Durand Hall Monday evening, 
when the famous' South Campus Jazz 
Band entertained the inmates of the 
Hall during dinner. The performance' 
was almost continuous during the 
dinner hour, and the selections were 
of the newest. The music was so 
entrancing that there were many who 
completely forgot to eat, and one per- 
son in her enthusiasm over a wicked 
bit of harmony almost choked on a 
large bite of lemon pie. To say that 
the entertainment was appreciated is 
drawing it mildy. 

Every one in the Hall is most 
grateful to the men who compose 
the Orchestra for the rare treat. 



W Y" Secretary Here 

As announced last week, we have 
a "Y" secretary, Mr. O. F. Meyers, 
who graduated from Ohio Wesleyan 
last June. Mr. Meyers made his first 
public appearance on the campus 
last week, when he addressed the 
student body in Chapel. 

A room in the President's House 
has been fitted up to serve as Y. M. 
C. A. headquarters. Here, the men 
may secure stationery, with writing 
facilities, wrapping paper for sending 
bundles home, and so forth. Although 
the room is not large enough for any 
general gathering, the men are wel- 
come to take advantage of this serv- 
ice until they are demobilized. 

It is unfortunate that Mr. Meyers 
will have no more time to organize 
the Y. M. C. A. work in the unit 
here. But there is work to do in put- 
ting the college organization upon 
a more active basis, and this he 
hopes to do before he leaves, which 
will be when the last man has been 
discharged from the S. A. T. C. unit. 

At the time of our going to press, 
Mr. Meyers was planning to arrange 
a talk in Chapel on the coming Sun- 
day evening by some worth while 
speaker. Several of those he had in 
mind were men who have been in the 
Association service overseas. These 
men are possibilities for later dates. 



Schedule May 

Be Changed 

At a meeting of the Faculty on 
Tuesday afternoon plans for the re- 
mainder of the year were discussed. 
It was decided to continue the three 
term schedule. This will enable 
some of the men who will be dis- 
charged from service, to return to 
school either in December or March. 
The Christmas Recess will extend 
from December 20th until January 
7th. The schedule of classes for next 
term has not been definitely settled 
but it may be predicted with certain- 
ty that chapel will be changed to the 
old time. Study Hall may be con- 
tinued, if so the sessions probably 
will be held in the Library. 



Special Chapel 
Service 

A most unusual opportunity was 
afforded the College and Music 
School students on last Saturday 
morning when M. Seymour de Ricci 
spoke in Chapel. He told of his own 
experiences on the Western Front, 
especially during the first months of 
the war, when in the great emer- 
gency he was forced to act as a med- 
ical aid without any previous experi- 
ence or preparation whatever. 

He told of the terrible destruction 
and desolation which he witnessed in 
towns and villages where the Ger- 
mans were forced to withdraw. His 
manner was most restrained even 
when telling of incidents which a- 
rouse the indignation of men and 
women far removed from these 
scenes. 

M. de Ricci was born in England 
and speaks English fluently, though 
he has lived in France the greater 
part of his life. During part of his 
service in the French Army, he acted 
as interpreter to the British Staff. 

M. de Ricci is in America now as 
a member of the French Educational 
Mission. 



46 



THE STENTOR 



Jen and Mary 

When in doubt ask Katherine 
Horten or Ruth Kenyon. They know 
the house-rules at last. 

Miss Kenyon will now favor us 
with general Order Number 6. 

Speaking of desprite characters, 
we award V. Pettigrew the tin foil 
medal. 

She Says she is a "regular blood- 
hound," playing around in the loop 
until — what time was it Beth? 

Our first contrib. favors us with 
the following: 

Eleven Peculiar Things About 
L. F. C. 

1. Alfred Plantin's dancing. 

2. McEvoy's mustache. 

3. Schreur's cigars. 

4. Schleman's walk. 

5. Francis Liddle's letters. 

6. Affenleises' affection. 

7. Vic Thomas' recitations. 

8. Baldwin's appetite. 

9. Prof. Van Steenderen's jokes. 

10. Prof. Raymond's 1:30 classes. 

11. Greenlie's solemnity. 



Reason number 49 8 for remain- 
ing in College — Christmas Musical. 



"Say Jen." 

"Oui, oui, Marie." 

"D'ja know the S. A. T. C.'s were 
nearly all going home to their mam- 
mas?" 

"Yes, ain't it tragic? The Saturday 
Afternoon Tea Club disbanding! Ain't 
it pathetic? Just when they got such 
swell new costumes, too!" 

"Well, darlink, I hereby move that 
the 'Saturday Afternoon Tea Club' be 
changed to the 'Stick Around 'Til 
Christmas' association. I'm heart 
broken. I picked out the cutest 
little frosh to vamp and I know 
that without a uniform he'd look like 
an alley-rat." 

"No! if I was going to be a vam- 
pire!" 

"But Jennie, think later, chapel — 
"Oh girlie, its worth anything." 



Vera Pettigrew entertained Helen 
Barnthouse Thanksgiving Day. 

Julia Hoffman has returned to 
school after a short illness. 

Elsie Engel spent the week end 
at her home in Ottawa. 

Ruth Bridgeman and Rebecca 
Armstrong visited friends in Chicago 
Thanksgiving. 



Thanksgiving in the 
Hall 

Thanksgiving dawned rainy and 
gloomy to greet a bunch of rather 
homesick girls in Lois Durand Hall. 
This homesickness, however, did'nt 
last very long when we all saw the 
wonderful dinner and fire made 
ready for us in the fire place. 

Professor and Mrs. Thomas, Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. Bridgeman and 
Margaret Bridgeman, Professor and 
Mrs. Allee and their two children, 
and four nurses from the Great Lakes 
were the guests who made the din- 
ner so enjoyable. After dinner coffee 
was served in the big room and a 
few pleasant hours were spent around 
the fire place. After all the guests 
had departed we all stayed to watch 
the fire die out while we read some 
stories. 

Soon the remains of the turkey 
was served to a still hungry bunch 
and many were the remains, let me 
tell you, although it may seem con- 
trary to all precedent. 

Sigma Tau announces the pledging 
of the following, Nov. the 22nd. 

Rebecca Armstrong 
Lillian Stevens 
Helen Lockard 
Irene Farwell 
Zelma Farwell 
Helen Hoyer 
Josephine Clarke 
Flora Shattuck 
Sara Fisher 
Kathryn Horton 
Mary Burnett 

Theta Psi announces the pledging 
of the following, Nov. the 22nd. 

Mildred Gerlach 
Helen Barndhouse 
Edith Wise 
Beth Thayer 
Vera Pettigrew 



Zelma and Irene Farwell spent the 
week end in Chicago with relatives. 

Rebecca Armstrong will attend an 
Ottumwa luncheon in Chicago Satur- 
day. 

Lillian Stephens visited friends in 
Chicago last week end. 



Sgt. Eickhoff writing home: "Dear 
Folks at Home — Thanks for the box 
of candy. The piece I got was fine." 



Dere Faculty 

Dere Faculty, 

It is with a very guilty feeling 
that I steal the lime from my studies 
;o write you this here little note, but 
I know that when I'm thru you'll for- 
give me if I have'nt recited quite as 
brilliantly as usual in all my classes. 
People always like to know their 
.'aults, don't they? So I ssy if you 
3ah make someone happy, even per- 
haps at a bit of a personal sacrifica, 
_t's always worth your while and you 
will get your reward somewhere even 
if it isn't in the monthly grade sheets, 
/ou see, it's this way. While I don't 
mind myself all the work you care to 
pile on, and while I always try to 
oarry out my part well and do my 
duty with out grumbling, even tho 
it be hard and the burden be heavy, 
and while I don't care so much about 
having extra time for diversions and 
such things — still, I have several 
friends who have mentioned it to me 
that they were sort of tired of work- 
ing so hard all the time and that they 
thot maybe you Faculty was a bit 
hard on the monthly grades and 
things and they thot maybe if you 
knew how they felt you might be 
willing to sacrifice your own pleasure 
a little bit and make the work not 
quite so hard. So I thot maybe, since 
I was an entirely disinterested party 
I might be able to suggest it to you 
tactfully and let you see how they 
felt without any personal hard feel- 
ings. I'm sure I was right there, 
wasn't I? You Faculty has always 
been tolerably reasonable according 
to my opinion in spite of the general 
impression, so you see how I stand. I 
can see how you feel about wanting 
to be conscientious about earning 
your pay in these here war times and 
I can see how you maybe don't notice 
you're working the students so hard, 
being so educated yourselves you 
don't realize how uncultured their 
brains is and how hard they have to 
work for what they get. Of course 
you understand this is entirely im- 
personal and no hard feelings on 
either side. I don't blame you at all, 
you're so busy with Faculty meetings 
and things, and if you make the work 
so easy I can't find enuf to do I'd 
just as soon go to another school 
where it's harder. You see I'm only 
one among many and I believe in 
sacrifice in the cause of the majority. 

Awaiting your thanks I remain 

Yours Disinterestedly. 
X. Y. Z. 



THE STENTOR 



47 



Letter from Fred Jansen 

Ensign Fred Jansen ex 'IS is in 
charge of a new office in Philadel- 
phia. The purpose of his department 
is to help the relatives and depen- 
dents of sailors who have had trouble 
in receiving their allotments. Hereto- 
fore the Red Cross and various lo- 
cal agencies have been appealed to 
but the navy, believing it can handle 
these cases better itself, has estab- 
lished an office in each naval district. 
The following letter was received 
from Ensign Jansen last week — ■ 

"Receipt is acknowledged of a copy 
of the Stentor, and enclosed you will 
find check for one dollar covering my 
subscription for the year 1918-19 
Kindly send the publication to the 
attached address. 

"You may be interested in knowing 
that a small "get-together" of Lake 
Forest men was held here in Phila- 
delphia last Thursday evening. Those 
who answered to roll call were Fred 
Dunsmore '15, Russell R. Berry '16, 
and myself. Freddy is now a con- 
struct'on engineer rnd is busy at the 
present time building piers in the 
De'aware River. His home address 
is 41G South Broad Street, Philadel- 
phia. "Bud" Berry is an expert 
chemist and is performing special- 
ized analysis work at the Navy Yard 
Philadelphia. H.'s home address is 
1900 North Eleventh Street, Philadel- 
phia. 

"The members of the faculty and 
others may be interested to hear that 
I came across our former English 
Professor, John Mantle Clapp, who is 
now holding a series of public speak- 
ing courses throughout the east. 
Sincerely, 

F. E. JANSEN, 
Ensign, Pay Corps 
U. S. Navy. 



Annie Hintz Col-yum 

My dear Miss Hintz: 

Though I am only a Freshman at 
school I have already acquired the 
name of "College Vamp." The men 
do like me and I like them in a sis- 
terly way, but the term vamp is such 
an odious one. How shall I rid my- 
self of it? 

A Worried Sister. 

W. S. 

Get yourself campused for a couple 
of weeks and the men will forget that 
you exist. Your chances for dates 
will be crumbed for the year and 
gradually your name will be applied 
to another. 

Sincerely, Annie. 

Dear Miss Hintz: 

Is it proper for a young man to 

treat a young lady to food after the 

heatre? My appetite is usually large 

■fter a show and Filbert rarely falls 

for my hints. What is the difficulty? 

Peaches and Cream. 

^eaehes and Cream: 

It is both fitting and proper that 
Filbert should take you for food 
fter the theatre. However, you must 
remember that after the boy has 
bought theatre tickets his finances 
night be very low. Don't embarrass 
'in by demanding food. You might 
create a very intense situation. You 
might suggest taking cheaper seats 
so that his money would go farther. 
Annie Hintz. 



Corporal Beauchamp to his squad 
at squad drill: "Squad! tenSHUN! 
Forward march! hun, tuh, he, foh, 
hip, hip, hun, tuh, he, foh, hip hip. 
Squads east, harch! hun, tuh .he, 
foh!" 

"Squad ■ whoa!!" 



Charles Mather is .back on the 
campus. He has received his dis- 
charge from the flying school at Fort 
Worth, Texas. 



Pay up your W. S.S. pledge and get 
it off your hands. 



Dear Annie: 

There's a man on this campus that 
I simply adore. He never pays any 
attention to me and frequently calls 
up other girls for dates. I am in- 
sanely jealous when I see him step- 
ping out with another. What course 
shall I take to interest him? I believe 
if I could only secure one date, he 
would be mine. 

Rosy Cheeks. 

Rosy Cheeks: 

The only solution I can think of is 
for you to bribe the lucky girl who 
has a date with him, to exchange with 
you. Then cut her out if possible. 
That might seem like a catty trick 
but "all's fair in love or war." 

Wishing you luck in your peril- 
ous undertaking. 

Annie. 

My dear Miss Hintz: 

I am a most attractive young wo- 
man, nineteen years old. I have had 
many violent cases on men but never 
did I like a person as well as I do 
Percival. There are several other 



men writing to me now that I seem 
to have lost my interest in them. 
Shall I continue my correspondence 
with them, or write only to Percival, 
my ideal? 

Juanita. 

Dear Juanita: 

I'd advise you to keep up your 
correspondence with the other men 
even though you are disinterested. If 
you should not, and Percival should 
prove false, where would you be? It 
is much wiser to keep several men on 
the string then to devote all your 
time to one. 

As ever, 

Annie. 

Dear Annie Hintz: 

Charlie is a good fellow but he has 
many faults which bother me a lot. 
Can I marry him knowing this or had 
I better look elsewhere for a hus- 
band. Aside from that Charlie suits 
me perfectly. 

Sincerely Yours, 

Glycerina. 

Dear Glycerina: 

If Charlie's faults over balance 
the other part of his nature or if you 
notice them all the time, you had 
better seek another. However you 
must remember that no human is 
perfect and at times even you might 
do something which would annoy 
him. Also try to determine whether 
his faults are really serious ones or 
only idiosyncrasies. 

Always, 

Annie. 



Gems from English 31 

As the strains of "Poor Butterfly" 
were wafted on the breeze to us from 
the Zoological laboratory in College 
Hall, Professor Troutman paused long 
enough in his long discourse to re- 
mark that he thought the music very 
apropos in a Zoology class. 

Lois Ryno was informed that her 
reading was much better after she 
had put her teeth out of the way. 

And speaking of sundaes, we beg 
leave to tell you that this same 
Professor wanted us to speak more 
plainly because we were giving him 
a verbal tutti - frutti. 

Gee, kids, don't you wish you were 
taking public speaking? 



Patriotism does not cease when 
fighting ceases — keep on buying W. 
S. S. 



48 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

I'ublished weekly during the collegiate 
year by the students of Lake Forest 
College. 
Board of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '19. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Ralph Stewart, '20. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters: 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Otis Chatfield-Taylor, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

James Crawford, '22. 

Howard Wood, '22. 

Prof. W. R. Bridgeman. 
Faculty and Alumni. 
Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postofflce of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



THE Students' Army Training 
Corp lias proved an interesting 
experiment. It was a paper 
scheme, cut to an ingenious pattern. 
It has not fitted the situation exactly, 
but how could it? It was planned to 
give young men simultaneous train- 
ing in military affairs and in acad- 
emic subjects. It has worked out 
more on the lines of a loosely run 
cantonment with educational deco- 
rations. Especially for technical stu- 
dents — medical students, engineer 
ing students, chemical students — it 
has so far been pretty nearly a fail- 
ure. The men who do most of their 
educational work in the laboratories 
have found that they have too little 
time to study. This is also true of 
other students and a good many men 
of this sort are already planning on 
taking this years' work all over again 
when they are discharged from ser- 
vice. 

Even the "ordinary" students who 
are trying to learn mathematics, and 
English, and French have had their 
troubles. At the University of Illi- 
nois the month of October was found 
to have been so largely wasted that 
on November 1 they decided on a 
fresh start; they began all their 
classes over again. Scores of men 
having reported that they had been 



unable to attend a single class in the 
first thirty days. At Lake Forest 
conditions have not been so acute, 
but the plan has not worked out as 
successfully as was hoped. 

However, confusion — bewilder- 
ment — Babel has reigned supreme!! 
The march of events has been so 
swift and revolutionary in the last 
four months that the dizzy world is 
unable in its perplexity to determine 
or divine just "What will happen 
next." Nations are broken up that 
they may be reunited; men are talk- 
ing in strange and unaccustomed 
phrases. The center of social gravity 
is shifting. It is not strange if some 
of this uncertainty has influenced 
even our secluded life in college. 
Just two months ago we were work- 
ing feverishly, eagerly, to readjust 
our college life to meet the demands 
of war. Our country needed men, and 
was forced to reach into the educa- 
tional institutions of the land to fill 
the ranks. All our efforts were bent 
toward the prosecution of the fight 
for freedom. Through a series of 
radical changes a semblance of or- 
ganization and order had just ap- 
peared when an event four thousand 
miles away transformed order into 
disorder, organization into confusion. 

A greater task than before now 
confronts us. The problems of peace 
are so much more numerous, so much 
more bewildering, so much more 
pressing than even those of war that 
we face the necessity again of read- 
justing our college life to meet the 
new situation. The world is in sore 
need of trained men and women to 
solve its perplexing political, eco- 
nomic, industrial, and educational 
problems — and those men and wo- 
men must come from the colleges 
and universities of America. They 
must be soldiers, statesmen, and edu 
cators all at the same time. Their 
natures must be trained to be cham- 
eleonic — their minds to think in 
world terms. 

The first readjustment was the re- 
sponsibility of the college authorities; 
THIS IS OURS. 



Sgt. Tucker to a Rookey: "Do you 
belong to Co. B?" 

Rookey: "No sir. It's the Flue 
that makes me look so bad." 



Sgt. Tucker to Sgt. Rees: "Say 
Rees, what are you going to do with 
those big shoes?" 

Sgt. Rees replies: "As soon as I 
learn to drive them I will park them 
in the barracks." 



Social Readjustment 
After the War 

The recall of the S. A. T. C. is the 
most prominent development of the 
moment in the educational institu- 
tions of the country and leads us to 
inquire a little more closely into the 
conditions which brought it into ex- 
istence and the present reasons for 
discontinuing it. 

Being in the midst of a war to 
make democracy safe throughout the 
world and knowing full well the ab- 
solute necessity for a large number 
of trained officers as a bulwark for 
the safety of the country not only in 
this war but also for future possibil- 
ities, we hastened to complete an 
organization which would fill the re- 
quirements along the line of least re- 
sistance. Thus the S. A. T. C. came 
into being. 

During its brief life it became full 
of promise and bid fair, after under- 
going stages of transformation all 
human institutions are heir to, to 
really fulfill its purpose of forming a 
reliable body of picked young men 
from among whom could be recruited 
a most efficient and trustworthy 
corps of army officers commensurate 
in numbers with modern times and 
needs. 

By the withdrawal of the S. A. T. 
C. we are reminded that this neces- 
sity has again become remote and Is 
replaced by the more urgent one of 
constructive work which shall reknit, 
so to speak, the strained sinews of 
the people and restore again to the 
latter the full elasticity of its wonted 
equilibrium. 

Thus we see that this incident is a 
part of the whole great question of 
the rapid reabsorption into the so- 
cial body of the large numbers so 
suddenly withdrawn from (produc- 
tive activity when war was declared 
in 1917. 

It is safe to assume that, with 
care and some foresight, supposing 
all the elements to be the same, the 
former state of. equilibrium would be 
possible. 

Is it probable? 

If our boys had undergone no ex- 
periences during their year or more 
of service, either abroad or in this 
country, things would certainly run 
along smoothly again in their for- 
mer tracks. 

According to evolutionary law 
there can be no standing still. Upon 
examination of the conditions our 
boys have encountered in Europe and 
Asia, we notice that elements will 



THE STENTOR 



49 



necessarily have been furnished them 
which will destroy among them many 
preconceived notions due to want o£ 
breadth of action. 

Besides this great fact they are re- 
turning to their country to find the 
former freedom of action largely gone 
excepting along certain well defined 
channels determined mostly by grow- 
ing economic necessity brought about 
by increasing demands on the part of 
the government and increasing rise 
in the cost of living, two phenomena 
which indicate increasing instability 
in the social equilibrium. 

These two phenomena have gone 
hand in hand with the severe social 
changes which have shot through 
European history within the last 
eighteen months and, most certainly, 
have had most to do with their con- 
summation. History repeats itself, we 
say, and the human animal, under 
like conditions, is most apt to act 
very similarly. Let us ask ourselves 
what will be the effect upon the body 
of American citizenship, battling with 
the above mentioned economic forces, 
of the injection into its midst of a 
broader view of individual and col- 
lective duty, such as our boys are 
certain to bring with them to their 
nearest and their dearest? 

Some considerations will be in or- 
der in a subsequent article, bearing 
upon our duty in this national crisis 
which is forming around us together 
with suggestions as to what course 
to pursue in guiding our beloved 
Ship of State safely through the 
rapids we are approaching and a- 
round the waterfall we hear thunder- 
ing right ahead. 
A. G. Nov. 28th, 1918. 

Now that the government has or- 
dered the demobilization of the S. A. 
T. C. can't we go back to the habits 
of the good old days when chapel 
came at ten o'clock-? 

One isn't much in the mood for 
the chapel service when he or she 
has to rush over at such an early 
hour, but it really is enjoyed when 
that half hour of rest comes in the 
middle of the morning between four 
strenuous classes. 

Truly we aren't old "fogies" who 
object to all new ideas and it has 
been rather a novel experience for 
all to start the day so early but we 
all agree that the proper time for 
chapel is ten o'clock. Even Heinie 
Dorn, who objects to early rising as 
well as the rest of us. 



Pass in Review 

Bob Framberg, while he has not 
entirely relented, has decided to pro- 
test against our treatment of him, 
but fortunately, for we are shy on 
material this week, his wail is in 
most acceptable form. Here it is: 
(verbatim) 

Boys, I've played my cards at witi- 

ness 
And a failure have I been. 
I could not rouse that giddiness, 
That comes with jokes of vim. 

Of course, that's not my own impres- 
sion 

From the funny things I've said, 

But the way friend Taylor mutilates 
them, 

They sound so very dead. 

But lives there a man who'd try but 

once 
To get into the press? 
If so it is not I, for lo! 
I'm here to do my best. 



I'm going to try at poetry, 

For at that I'm a shark, 

And Shakespeare won all kinds 

fame, 
At that literary art. 



of 



And then when the next issue comes 
If ridiculed I am, 
My only hope and comfort 
Is Taylor is a Ham. (at copying 
things.) 



We really think Sergeant Rees 
should restrain his tendency to cav- 
ort with the wild Ferries and arrive 
at Students Council meetings on time 



Three reason why David Rees 
in the army: Ann, Sarah, Mil. 



Scene any Saturday morning. 

Ned, at the phone, "222 please." 

"Is Miss Zenos there?" 

"Hello Mil, let's go down town to- 
night, want to?" 

"That's fine, I'll be round at six 
o'clock, Good-bye!" 
Scene shifts to Blackstone Hall Y. M. 
C. A. rooms. 

Ned, "Say, Mudge, lend me ten 
dollars?" 



Lucius says he had about decided 
to join the Robinson Crusoe Club 
when the girls talked him out of it. 



While in some respects Co. A is 
almost as good as Co. B, as far as 
modern conveniences are concerned, 
the latter is miles in advance. Co. B 
has a Private Bath. 



Extracts from Letter 
Just Received From 
Capt. Ray Bridgman 

The following is a brief extract 
from a letter written October twenty- 
fourth, and just received, from Cap- 
tain Ray C. Bridgman, who has been 
flight commander of the 2 2nd Aero 
Squadron since about September first. 
It is pretty certain by inference that 
the squadron was in the St. Mihiel 
drive, but just where it was located 
subsequently does not yet appear. 

"My squadron has done well in its 
brief career. We have had twenty 
official victories in about six weeks. 
The endless mists of this region at 
this season have considerably hinder- 
ed flying. A third of my pilots have 
been lost during the six weeks. It is 
heart breaking to see one's friends 
disappear day after day" * * * 

The second extract is in a manner 
out of date, but may be interesting 
as showing the final attitude of a 
"fighting pacifist." 

"We heard President Wilson's an- 
swer to Germany last night. It 
brings the whole discussion up to a 
definite issue. If Germany accepts the 
terms of the armistice which General 
Foch frames, peace is not far off. In 
the meantime we carry on the war 
just as though there were no sign of 
peace. It is glorious to contrast the 
military situation of today with that 
of July fifteenth. I am not a "bitter 
ender", but I think that Germany as 
a nation should have to accept terms 
which will make a deathless impres- 
sion upon her and upon all like her 
in the future as to the futility of the 
ambition to dominate the world." 

(From "The Lake Forester"). 



We have discovered the King of 
indoor sports. It is trying to eat spa- 
ghetti on the easy riding (compared 
to a Henry) dining car of the North 
Shore Electric. If you don't believe 
us, try it yourself. 



Although it has been our policy 
before to be merely frivolous, we 
believe it will not be out of place to 
end what, owing to demobilization, 
may be the last appearance of this 
column, with the following bit of 
sentiment. 

To all the men who are leaving now 
We wish a holiday of cheer; 
By hook or crook or anyhow 
We want to have you back next year. 



50 



THE STBNTOR 





STYLES THAT 


PLEASE 


for 


COLLEGE MEN 


and WOMEN 


RASMUSSEN BROS 


. BOOT SHOP 




Market Sq 


U ARE 



USE BOWMAN'S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milK bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Hi'gbland Park 9 1C1-1C9 Vine Ave 



Alunini Notes 

The following brief extract from a 
letter, tells something of the work of 
Miss Edna Stuart, Professor Stuart's 
daughter, in France. 

"We have splendid news from Ed- 
na who is crazy about her work and 
can't bear to see the boys leave the 
hospital. She says they are a splen- 
did lot of fellows and more plucky 
than anyone can imagine. She has 
a lot of trophies that they have given 
her — an iron cross, a German mace 
and lots of other things. She has al- 
so made some nice friends among the 
French people, especially a woman, 
who is the wife of a professor at 
Lille University, and her daughter. 
Both are temporarily at Limoges 
where Edna's hospital is." 

1S95. Capt. John G. Coulter is head 
of the American Garden Service in 
France. Address Q. M. Dept., 12 Rue 
d'Aguesseau, Paris. 

1896. Miss Augusta Stuart is on a 
leave of absence for a year from 
Nicholas Senn High School in Chicago 
and is in Washington, acting as an 



"Executive Secretary" in the Quar- 
termaster's Department, "directing a 
number of girls and acting as private 
secretary to an officer." 

190S. His old high school principal 
writes of George R. Hicks, "He is 
now a Major in active service. He 
was graduated at West Point and has 
made an enviable record. He really 
is an unusually competent sort of 
man, who has seen service in China 
and the Philippines as well as in 
France." 

190S. L. D. Callahan, who has been 
attending the "Listener's School" at 
the Naval Training School at Brem- 
erton, Washington, will return to 
business life as soon as feasible. 
Some two years ago he moved to 
Kansas City in connection with the 
organization of the Missouri Petro- 
leum Products Co., of which he is 
still vice-president, and which prom- 
ises to be a successful venture. He 
has also been interested in the or- 
ganization of a realty company in 
Omaha, which has already put up the 
"Kingsborough" Apartments in that 
city. On enlisting he sold out his in- 
terest in the Callahan Stock Remedy 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator ^ervice 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 
NOTARY PUBLIC 



TEL. 644 



LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



FRANK BULOW 

Barber 

Under Jensen's Shoe Store 
RAILROAD TICKETS 



The 

Calvert Floral Co. 

O TR1EBWASSEP, Prop. 
Phone 1 7 Lake F< rest, 111. 



C. T. Gunn Co. 

Grocers 



Agency Huyler'* Candirs 

Curtice Bros. Go ds LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD. Piop. 
Phone 1,75 

Whx? 

Ask any good dresser in LaVe Forrst 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double DI«c 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



Jr\.UrjJj/L,OJV I Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab C tnpany 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



51 



Established ffll 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 
73 75 W. South Water Street 

Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



Dr. C. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:1)0 a m to 1:00 p.m. to 

12: m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



llllllHIUIII!llllllllllll!lllllllllllllllli«!IIIIIU|[||!IUIIIIIIII!llllll!!llll!lll!!llll!llll!lllll 

/^JLASS Pins and Rings. 
^""^ Fraternity and Sorority 
Jewelry. Programs. 

SPEIS BROS. V'^Tc ago 

ii 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everylhino 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, III. 



/^y For Light 

I t/7 C For Heat 
KJVl^ For Power 

North Shore Gas Co. 

■in 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 




rgpttttga, fflolkfl! 



77THE Joyous Season of 

W Xmas is almost here. Christ- 
mas that gladdens life and puts 
us all in the happiest of moods. 

AND the one greatest Agency 
that instills the wonderful influence of 
Xmas in all minds is the store which really 
bt-comes the show place for the varied 
handiwork of Santa Claus. 

"All Are Welcome at This Store" 

10 Market AlKrtftnf <{. fjTrt formerly Meyer 

Square *» V}}?* <*- WW- & Dobson Co. 

Dry Goods : Women's & Children's Furnishing 



Co., the company famous for its real 
istic letterhead. Mr. Callahan was 
married in August, 1917, to Miss 
Marguerite Colund of Oklahoma City. 
His permanent address remains for 
the present 504 McCague Bldg., Om- 
aha, Nebr. 

1910. Mrs. George (Clara Craw- 
ford) Sheldon's new address is 340 
Highland Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

1915. At last accounts John L. 
Baer, who enlisted in December last, 
was at Camp Meigs; care Port Ex- 
change, Washington, D. C. He is 
now a sergeant in charge of a squad 
of 47. Married a little time back a 
fellow teacher from the high school 
at Gladstone, Mich. 

1917. At the time of the closing of 
the war, Sergt. Lorrain G. Smith, who 
for the past sixteen months has been 
driving an ambulance in Section 627 
of the French army, was in the In- 
fantry Officer's Training School at 
Larel, France, and may continue 
Jiere for a time. 

1917. John W. Hawes has been 
transferred from Camp Syracuse to 
17th Service Co., Signal Corps, at 
Washington. • His address is 100 9- 
5th St., S. E. 

1918. R. B. Phillips is now in tbe 
Officer Material School at Princeton 
N. J., and may stay on in the service 
for some time. 

1919. Lieut. Francis Miller, it is 
reported, has been seriously wound- 
ed and will be in hospital for three 
or four months. 

Ensign Gilroy Writes 

Home the Day Armistice 

Was Signed 

The war is over. It is wonderful 
to be in this part of the world at this 
time, everybody is crazy with joy. 
From eleven to twelve all the whis- 
tles blew, flags flying, people cheer- 
ing. 

French children, women, old men, 
even German prisoners, cheering and 
waving flags. 

I realize now when writing this it 
is about eight a. m. for you, but you 
must have heard about it. It is won- 
derful. With love to all, 

EDWIN. 
(From "The Lake Forester"). 



Beth Thayer entertained Edith 
Wise several days last week at her 
home in Chicago. 

Helen Lockard and Rebecca 
Armstrong spent Monday in Chicago. 



Chambers 
Studio 

209 S. State St., Chicago 
Republic Bldg. 



llllll!l!ii!!!fl!!ii!!!!!!l!ll!IIII!llllil!l!llli 

m The 

Sheridan Cafe 

MARIAN H. CRAIG 

Two Good Places to Eat 
HOME and HERE 

10 N. Sheridan Road 
HIGHLAND PARK :: ILL. 

;, l an:"', , 



TheV^/uality Tire Co 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsfay 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



Provision ^Dealers 



Grocery Market 

807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 

Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



JTT $65.00 takes my $250.00 

&| size phonograph, one diamond, 
one sapphire point needle, and 200 
"^ steel needles and records. All new- 
used two weeks. Act quick. 317 Greenleaf 
Ave., Wilmette. 

200 ft. from Linden Sta. Mil. Elec. 



52 



THE STENTOR 



IIIIIIIIII 



aiiiiiiii! 



iiiiiniiii 



1 . LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

1 at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

■ Always offers a liberal training under experienced professors and excellent provision for 
I the physical and social welfare of its students, in a beautiful environment. 

| THE S. A. T. C. 

As is now well known, units of tbe Students Arniu Training Corps are maintained at 

B manu colleges, to which are admitted graduates of high schools or tbose offering an equi- 

I valent preparation. Sucb men are inducted into tbe Army and given subsistence, pau of 

■ $30 per montb, and botb mibtaru and collegiate instruction. Tbe unit at Lake Forest is 

■ limited to about 200 men, and experience bas already proved tbat tbe conditions bere 
J are most favorable in tbe way of bousing, mess-ball, drill-ground and direction. As a num- 
ber of tbe present cpiota are likely to be promoted to an Officers' Training Camp in 

■ December, tbere will be places available for new-comers about January 1. 



Under tbe same government as tbe College, but witb separate buildings and faculties are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY 
A preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL 

A school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

With an independent organization, offering superior advantages. 

For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, 111. 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 

C. G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 
Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 
A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing ■ Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning and Pressing . . $1.50 

Pressing ... . . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



J. 



L. 'SMITH 

Representing 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



—J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Oscar Pierson 

FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, HI. 



M. H. Hussey & Go. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, December 13, 1918. 



NUMBER 8. 



Band Concert 

and Dance 

Thursday evening, December the 
fifth, the S.A.T.C. band gave a con- 
cert and dance at the Durand Art In- 
stitute. This is the first organized 
band that Lake Forest College has 
ever had and the members ought to 
be congratulated on their organi- 
zation and its success. 

There was a short program of 
pieces which the band played excep- 
tionally well, under the leadership of 
Mr. Brisbin. This program lasted un- 
til about nine o'clock and then danc- 
ing followed. 

The Jazz orchestra composed of 
Merle McEvoy, Otis Chatfield Taylor, 
Norman Lillis and Leonard Huffer 
played for the dancing. Messrs. Fitz- 
patrick, Lobdell and Speidel helped 
out the orchestra. This orchestra is 
considered one of the best around 
Chicago — due to the fact that each 
of the men composing it is very effi- 
cient. The music which they play is 
the very newest and best. 

This dance was one of the biggest 
successes of the year, owing to the 
good music and the informality of 
the occasion. Nearly everyone in 
school was at the dance and the '"cut- 
in" feature was novel and interesting. 

We all appreciate the work of the 
men in the band and the orchestra. 
We have enjoyed their music and feel 
that they are to be commended for 
the good work which they have done 
and we will all miss the band. 



Miss Halsey Speaks 
in Chapel 

Last Wednesday morning Miss 
Katherine Halsey addressed the stu- 
dent body in chapel. Miss Halsey is 
Dr. Halsey's daughter and has just 
returned from Shanghai, China, 
where she has been part of the facul- 
ty of- the Union College at Pekin. 
Miss Halsey emphasized the impor- 
tance of China as one of our allies 
in the war and showed that it was 
equally important to make China our 



Demobilization Ends 



LAST MAN DISCHARGED 
SATURDAY 

First to get under way while the 
war was still in progress, first to be 
demobilized when the need no long- 
er existed, the Lake Forest S.A.T.C. 
Unit ended its existence, as far as 
the 138 enlisted men were concerned, 
on Saturday night. That the work of 
discharging the men was done in an 
unexpectedly short time is shown by 
the facts that this is the only school 
in this part of the country where de- 
mobilization to a man has been ac- 
complished and that the War Depart- 
ment is still exhorting Lieutenant 
Thompson to make every effort to 
have all men out by December 21. 

All day Saturday and most of Fri- 
day was given up to the work of re- 
turning various equipment and sign- 
ing various papers. Each man re- 
ceived a complete uniform, which he 
may wear for four months, after 
which time it must be returned to 
the Zone Supply Officer in Chicago. 
The pay for seven days in December 
and refund of two installments on 
Liberty Bonds was not ready until 
after Mess Saturday night, or the dis- 
banding would have been complete 
several hours sooner. 

Sunday, and ever since, the campus 
has been a Deserted Village. The 
sadness which marked the last Re- 
treat spread throughout the handful 
who remained Sunday and the slight- 
ly larger number who were back for 
classes Monday. We imagine that 
those who went home not to return 
felt the same sense of lonesomeness, 
too. 

Marion Preston visited relatives in 
Oak Park last Sunday.. , 



ally in Christianity. Miss Halsey's 
talk was most interesting and we 
hope to hear her in chapel soon again. 
Next Tuesday Charles, Stecart who 
has just returned from Petrograd 
will tell us of his experiences, there 
during the past two years. 



OVER HALF OF MEN LEAVE 

Although things were in a state of 
great uncertainty on the south cam- 
pus, and there was ho more infar- 
mation available at the college office, 
the indications were that something 
less than half of the men enrolled OH;- 
der the S.A.T.C. will remain. 

Monday and Tuesday there were 
only about fifty in evidence. It was 
the opinion of Dr. Wright and Mr. 
Richman, however, that quite a few 
of those who intended to continue in 
school had gone home for a few dayjs 
only and would return. It was es- 
timated that the number on the caja- 
pus and returning would approxi- 
mate seventy-five, half the number 
enrolled before demobilization. Pi 

From the indication of the corres- 
pondence which has J>een received 
from old students ; now awaiting, dis- 
charge from different branches of "the 
service, it seems likely that a con- 
siderable number will return on Jan- 
uary 7, and more at the beginning of 
the spring quarter. While 'it is, im- 
possible to estimate at the-, present 
time the number of . such because 
their return depends upon so many 
different circumstances, it seems 
reasonably safe to predict that our en- 
rollment will be almost up 1 to' the 
average by the end of the year. 



Changes in Schedule 

Beginning last Tuesday the old 
schedule has been resumed. Chapel 
now comes at ten oi' clock instead of 
eight. All excuses previously granted 
to out of town students axe, cancelled 
and roll will be taken carefully here- 
after. 

Thursday- and Friday were regis- 
tration days for the second quarter. 
Several new courses are being given 
and the schedule is being rearranged 
in its more customary form. On Wedr 
nesday, Thursday, and Friday of next 
week the quarterly examinations will 
be given. The schedule of these will 
probably soon be' posted. 



5 4 



THE STENTOR 



New Girls' Dinner 

The annual "New Girls' Dinner" 
took place on Friday evening. Decem- 
ber 6, at Lois Durand Hall. It was 
the ninth of its kind and proved even 
more charming and successful than 
any of its predecessors. 

At this time the upper classmen 
have an opportunity to welcome the 
freshmen girls formally. Although 
postponed this year until an unusu- 
ally late date, there was no lack of 
interest or spontaneity on the part 
of old or new girls. 

At seven o'clock about 85 guests 
and students sat down in the candle 
lighted dining room to a very delight- 
fully served dinner. 

Miss Hamilton acted as toastmis- 
tress and introduced the speakers of 
the evening in a very charming and 
appropriate fashion. Dr. Wright was 
present and in an interesting talk ex- 
pressed his appreciation of the co- 
operation on the part of Lois Hallers 
during the past year. The House 
President, Harriet Harris, extended a 
very cordial welcome to all the new 
girls and Ruth Bahlert responded to 
the toast in behalf of the freshmen. 
Mrs. Atkisson of Lake Forest empha- 
sized in her talk the value of culti- 
vating a vocation and Gwendolyn 
Massey gave a very snappy talk on 
"Anything and everything." 

The principal speech of the evening 
was made by Miss Katherine Halsey 
in which she gave a most interesting 
account of her experience during the 
last two years as a member of the 
faculty of the Union College in Pek- 
ing, China. 

After a short dance in the Big 
Room the evening ended with singing 
many old and familiar college songs. 
Whatever doubt may have lingered 
in any freshman's mind as to her 
welcome in Lois Durand Hall during 
the first days of the college year 
has been entirely and successfully re- 
moved by this most successful of 
"New Girls' Dinner." 

Beth Thayer and Edith Wise have 
been ill for several days. 



Virginia Wales spent the week end 
at her home in Rogers Park. 



Mrs. Hattie Hall Knox, an allum- 
nae, is visiting on the campus. 



Mrs. E. J. Mather has gone to Elm- 
hurst for a short visit with her par- 
ents. 



The Botany Class 
Takes a Trip 

Ihe eight-thirty train last Satur- 
day morning carried fourteen am- 
ateur botanists into the city, where 
they went to Garfield Park on an 
ardent search for knowledge. They 
realize how important it is for their 
future happiness to know which 
plants have their leaves arranged in 
whorls, which in squares, and which 
in prisms, commonly called the spiral 
arrangement. Miss Connelly was 
with us to assuage our hunger for 
knowledge. In the course of her lec- 
ture she informed us that everything 
which grew and was green was a 
plant. Then our star, Vera Petti- 
grew, asked — "Miss Connelly, are 
people from the country plants, they 
grow and are green?" Our digni- 
fied Harriet Harris spied a bird-nest 
fern, and got stuck in the mud when 
she tried to get to it. Sara Moore 
declared she saw popcorn growing on 
a palm tree. Agnes Hoffman's chief 
attraction was the gold fish. When 
Miss Connelly asked her to notice a 
tree with unsymmetrical, palmately 
veined leaves, which were arranged 
in a whorl, having elongated petioles, 
and stipulas modified to form leaves 
which looked exactly like its aerial 
roots, and whose tendrils supported 
it, Agnes looked up and said — "Ya! 
ain't it cute? oh, you dear little fish- 
ies." Ida Oliver, especially admired 
the pitchers on the pitcher plant. 

Before returning to Lake Forest we 
indulged in a ride on the "L", where 
two frosh demanded tickets — we re- 
frain from mentioning names in or- 
der to avoid embarrassment. On the 
whole the trip was most delightful 
and not even "Ten girls" were lost. 



Sleep between operas is sweet. Ask 
Jo and Flora. 



Vera Pettigrew spent the week end 
at her home in Harvey. 



Sara Ross and Delia Babcock visit- 
ed Sigma Tau over the week end. 



Helen Hoyer, Josephine Clarke, 
Flora Shattuck, Ruth Kennedy, Miss 
Hamilton, Miss Powell, and Miss 
Hospes attended Grand Opera last 
Saturday. 



Music School Notes 

Last Sunday a party of our girls 
went to the opera and heard Galli- 
Curci and John McCormack sing to- 
gether for the first time, in the opera 
"La Boheme." The scene was laid 
in the Latin Quarter in Paris, pre- 
senting a picture — which from our 
experience in North Hall we know to 
be true — of the life there and also 
showing the generous spirit of the 
people in sharing their poor wealth 
with less fortunate friends. The 
singing was exceptionally fine. The 
voices of Galli-Curci and McCormack 
blended together very harmoniously 
as their tone qualities are much a- 
like. We enjoyed the interpretation 
Galli-Curci gave to this opera, al- 
though it did not give her a chance 
to display any of her coloratura 
work. Irene Pawloska was brilliant 
in the role of Musetta. 



Our Song Book 

Dorothy Antrim ...."Sweet heart" 

Margaret Best "Smiles" 

Alina Boggis "Old Black Joe" 

Charoline Bivins . . . ."Anybody Here 
Seen Kelly" 

Evelyn Crosse "Ah, Frenchy" 

Hannah Friedman . . . "Thy beaming 

Eyes" 
Helen Reichert . . . "Wondrous Eyes 

of Araby" 
Ruth Randolph ."I'm always chasing 

Rainbows" 
Francilia Smith . "I ain't got nobody- 
much" 
Vesta Votaw "There's a Quaker down 
in Quaker Town" 

BEFORE EXAMS 

Lord God of Hosts be with us yet, 
Lest we forget, lest we forget. 

AFTER EXAMS 

Lord God of Hosts was with us not, 
For we forgot, for we forgot. 



Epitaph 



The bugle tolls the knell of parting 

day, 

S.A.T.C. winds slowly o'er the lea, 
Each soldier homeward plods his 

weary way, 
And leaves the camp to silence and to 

me. 

(With apologies to Gray) 



Last Wednesday the Faculty of 
Ferry Hall gave a reception in honor 
of their new Principal, Miss Eloise 
Tremain. 



Julia Hoffman has been obliged to 
leave school on account of ill health. 



Professor Sibley, who has been 111 
for several day s, is now on the road 
to recovery. 



THE STENTOR 



55 



In the Limelight 

The following little playlet entitled 
"In the Limelight" is just fresh from 
the pen of our War Correspondent 
and according to our idea should meet 
with splendid popularity at the hands 
of our tender readers. We even sug- 
gest that the Garrick Club consider 
it with an all-star cast. It should 
run big-time. (Editor's Note). 

Dramatis Personae 

(Cuthbert 

(Azalea 

Scene — Anywhere within the dazz- 
ling rays of the spotlight at the North 
East end of Lois Durand Hall. 

Time — Most any evening now. 

(Enter Cuthbert bearing sandwiches 
under his arm. As he advances into 
the full radiance of the light he pulls 
his cap down over his eyes. He 
wears a full civilian uniform and car- 
ries a green parasol. As the light 
becomes very dazzling he cautiously 
raises his parasol and approaching a 
window he whistles softly under his 
breath). 

Azalea (raising her window) Oh 
Cuthbert, is it really you? I feared 
you would not come tonight. 

Cuthbert — Ah yes, 'tis I. I come, 
oh fair one, at all odds. 

Azalea — Your devotion shall have 
its reward — (aside) say wait a min- 
ute till I get my dark glasses. (She 
reappears in a moment with dark 
goggles and lets down an awning 
over her window). 

Cuthbert — I have food for you Az- 
alea, thinkest thou that everyone in 
the Hall is looking? The only re- 
ward I ask, is that everyone should 
know of my generosity and how well 
I treat you. Let down the waste 
basket! 

Azalea (complying). It kills me 
to think of how many times you have 
brought food before they put up this 
spotlight and none ever knew you 
brought it. Stand forth, Cuthbert, 
and let them see you plainly. In 
truth you are a handsome cuss and 
your costume fits you well. 

Cuthbert — Hang not out so far 

Azalea, this light shows up the make- 
up pretty strong, I still would have a 
delusion. 

Azalea (having received the sand- 
wiches) You're right, as usual, I must! 



Y.W.C.A. Service 

Several weeks ago the girls of Lois 
Durand Hall registered to do some 
definite work in the village in con- 
nection with the Y.W.C.A. Some 
time ago three of the girls, Mildred 
Gerlach, Hazel Sequin, and Margaret 
Horton were chosen by Miss Hamil- 
ton to represent the college women 
in the organization of a chapter of 
the Girl's War Work Reserve. Mar- 
garet Horton has organized a series 
of clubs for the grade school children 
of the town. Another opportunity for 
service came Sunday with a call from 
Miss Levitt of the Y.W.C.A. for sev- 
eral of the girls to go down to the 
rooms to make sandwiches and pre- 
pare food for the usual evening tea 
for men in uniform. There was also 
a call for girls to go down later in 
the evening to help entertain. For 
this part of the affair each Jackie 
could choose a girl. Everyone seem- 
ed to enter into the spirit of things. 
Many songs were sung and old fash- 
ioned games were played. Every girl 
who went reported a good time and 
in addition really did some service 
for the Y.W.C.A. 



The Christmas 
Musicale 



Perhaps one of the events most 
looked forward to every year, is the 
Christmas Musicale, given by the Col- 
lege Women's Glee Club, in Lois Dur- 
and Hall. 

While this year it will not be as el- 
aborate an affair as previous years, a 
very interesting time is contemplated 
by all. 

A short musical program consist- 
ing of both instrumental and vocal 
solos has been planned by the club, 
followed by informal dancing. 

The Glee Club cordially invites the 
faculty and the student body to at- 
tend this musical, next Saturday, 
December fourteenth, at eight o'clock. 



Pass in Review 



Bob Framberg made a passing shot 
which we believe hit the mark. He 
said that A.W.O.L. was S.O.L. + 
H.E.L.L. 



The boys certainly started off the 
resumption of normal college life 
with a bang on Monday morning. We 
counted all of five in chapel. 



Of those we presume four were 
taking the roll of their respective 
classes. 



Did you wake up at six o'clock 
Monday morning from force of habit? 
We did, and believe ( me Xantippe, it 
was a g. and g. f. to roll over and 
go back to sleep with a free con- 
science. 



Now that the war is over, the chief 
question which is agitating us is to 
understand the military necessity for 
the spotlight on the northeast corner 
of Lois Durand Hall. We firmly be- 
lieve that this should become as ob- 
solete as reveille. 



Phil, how are you coming with the 
L. H. Bolsheviki? 



It is with regret that we contem- 
plate the disbanding of the Black- 
stone Hall Y.M.C.A. It was so much 
fun trying to retrieve our mattress, 
books, or what not after each session. 



After Lieutenant Thompson's fare- 
well address we conjecture that we 
will see fewer spiral puttees. The fol- 
lowing special order is, however, 
hereby published. 

Headquarters — Lake Forest S.A.T.O, 
December 7. 

Special Orders No. Umph. 

All men desiring to wear spiral 
puttees may do so on December 24th 
and 25th. This order is published 
because Christmas Trees are then in 
season. 

By order of 

General Debility. 



away — and this food smells darn 
good — goodnight. 

Cuthbert — But stay — I yet have 
time to say, (taking a megaphone 
from his hip pocket), what's the odds 
for a date tomorrow night? 

Azalea (blushing daintily) Oh, 
Cuthbert, you have such a way of get- 
ting what you want. (Putting both 
hands to her mouth) Yes — you can. 



Cuthbert — All right. (He bows low 
and sweepingly turns on his heel, 
and departs unto the shadows. 

Finis. 

P. S. — Read this through twice. It 
will sound foolish to you, perhaps, at 
first but that is only because you are 
young, perhaps, and do not appre- 
ciate the full significance. 

(Author's Note.) 



56 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

**ublished weekly during the collegiate 
year by the students of Lake Forest 
College. 
Board of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '19. 

Gwendolyn- Massy, '19. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Ralph Stewart, '20. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers : 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Otis Chatfield-Taylor, '21. 

Paul Offenheis x er, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

James Crawford, '22. 

Howard Wood, '22. 

Prof. W. R. Bridgeman. 

Faculty and Alumni. 
Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues '.'.:'. 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



WE sometimes wonder in our 
simple way whether we are 
unusually credulous, o r 
whether gullibility is a trait common 
to all editorial boards. Probably af- 
ter a few hundred years of experience 
we will be able to tell at a glance 
whether or not articles which are 
handed us are original or cribbed. 
Twice this year we have published 
editorials which we have later dis- 
covered were purloined from other 
papers. The leading editorial of last 
week's Stentor, we are informed, ap- 
peared some time ago in the Chicago 
Herald-Examiner. Now we do not 
wish to discourage contributions. In 
fact the Stentor would be a much bet- 
ter paper if our list of contributors 
was larger. But if you clip some- 
thing good from another paper do 
give that paper credit for it. Think 
of your feelings should you see your 
pet inspiration appear in the Podunk 
Journal as a bit of wisdom of the 
Podunk Journal's editorial staff. 
Billie Shakespeare may have been a 
plagiarist, but it is hardly necessary 
to remark that none of us are Billie 
Shakespeares. 



Jackie at Great Lakes to an L. F. 
Alum.- — "Say do you know Miss Lois 
Hall at Lake Forest? She lives in 
Suite 3." 



MERRY Christmas! The fam- 
iliar greeting must ring true 
this year of all years. From 
glad hearts, it should echo and re- 
echo over all the universe for there 
is "Peace on Earth." It is a peace 
that has been hard fought and won 
at the highest cost; still the perse- 
cuted Humanity which could so suf- 
fer for her rights, cannot but answer 
the cry, "Good will to men." 

Your Christmas may be brimming 
over with the joy of your boy coming 
home, yet you cannot forget that some 
may never welcome their returning 
soldiers. On Christmas day you may 
be surrounded by every comfort and 
luxury, others will be suffering un- 
speakable hunger and cold on our 
Lord's birthday. Can you selfishly 
enjoy your good fortune without 
sharing some with others less lucky? 

With the many many needs to be 
filled one has no excuse for not of- 
fering his mite to make some one's 
else Christmas a little happier. May 
everyone realize that by helping 
someone less fortunate than himself, 
he is helping create a universal cheer 
and at the same time is expressing 
to his neighbor the worthy sentiment 
— A merry Christmas to you! 



Many and varied are the benefits 
derived from the discontinuation of 
the military regime. For instance 
the culinary department of Lois Hall 
announces that hereafter the diners 
may have as many desserts as they 
can corral. This unsolicited generos- 
ity, we appreciate to the full. 

This is, we understand, a great loss 
to the department sustained merely 
to gratify the tastes of the inmates of 
the hall. In the case of apple pie, 
for instance, three pieces left over 
from dinner might easily, by the ad- 
dition of a few raisins and a little 
tapioca and lemon sauce, provide 
nourishing and appetizing desserts 
for a week to come. Nevertheless it 
is graciously given into the hands of 
the careless diners, who would, for a 
moment's enjoyment sacrifice a 
week's nourishment. Again, we ten- 
der our thanks for this all surpassing 
kindness. 

Xmas Shoppers 

We submit to your notice and con- 
sideration a new book just published 
setting forth remarkable discoveries 
in a new field of scientific endeavor. 
It is a book which no up-to-date per- 
son can afford to neglect. We refer, 
of course, to Ima Nutt's new volume 
"Scientific Methods of Opening Bak- 
ing Powder Biscuits." 



Jen and Mary 

Jen and Mary, having taken unto 
themselves the ever fashionable flu, 
and our cruel insatiate editors insis- 
ting, in spite of this lamentable catas- 
trophe, on the delivery of our usual 
amount of verbal padding, we have 
decided after deep consideration and 
long cogitation to throw open this 
here colyum to our eager contribs. 

Address all communications to Bur- 
eau of Desecration, Weakly Stentor, 
Fake Forest Scollege. Please write 
on one side of the paper only, and 
ship early to avoid clogging the mails 
of Uncle Sam. We will pay liberally 
for appropriate material, but we re- 
gret to state that it will be impossible 
to return the unsuccessful efforts of 
budding journalists. 

Our motto hence forth, now, and 
evermore shall be — "Turn on the 
gush, let the slush flow where it 
may." By this it is to be understood 
that our journalistic efforts shall fol- 
low the classic rules of colyumation- 
izing. 

Our policy is ever to be of a highly 
materialistic nature, and we are glad 
to say that, far from being hide- 
bound conservatives we are of that 
well known group which endeavors 
to catch every new movement on the 
fly and give it a helpful onward biff 
— in a word we are of the species 
known as radicals. Therefore no con- 
ventional, Madame Grundy advocate 
need send any of his high-brow mor- 
alistic dope in here. As we have said 
in our motto we are partial to Slush 
and Gush and therefore — also in ac- 
cordance with our radical views — are 
quite willing to accept on equal status 
with that of the studes any of our 
w. k. faculty who wish to enter them- 
selves as contribs. We wish however, 
to have our contribs understand that, 
although we hanker after high-brow 
goof not at all, we state definitely 
and finally that in order to make the 
colyum the Slush and Gush must be 
in its sweet and tender youth; must 
also be expressed in the best possible 
modern diction and finally must be 
of that, the-Lord-knows-what kind of 
material which we poor humans are 
want to call humor. These are our. 
honored precepts — go to it contribs 
and our blessings on ye. 

P. S. To save the expense of post- 
age which we fear many of our clev- 
erest would-be-contribs may lack, we 
ask that all communications to the 
line be addressed as above — design- 
ated and inserted in a box, marked and 
erected for the purpose in that time- 
honored and well-beloved edifice 
which among ye studes is known as 
College Hall. 



THE STENTOR 



67 



Letters to Santa! 



Dear Santa Claus — 

Please Santa send me a Book of 
House Rules and also some book that 
I can use as a reference to find out 
'■.'hen people are kidding me and when 
they aren't. Please Santa do this for 
me for I really need them. 

Frosh Kenyon. 



Santa Claus, 
North Pole. 
My dear Sir — 

I am writing to ask you if you 
would be so very considerate, and so 
very kind, as to send me (for a 
Christmas present and a sort of con- 
sideration for my faithful discharge 
of certain campus duties and oblig- 
ations) a young woman whom I may 
consider as my permanent date? I do 
so enjoy going to the college dances, 
for, even if I do say it myself, I am 
really very skilled in the gentle terp- 
sichorean art. But, as I was saying, 
although I greatly admire the lovely 
co-eds who frequent the campus they 
are all so very, very tall. And really, 
kind sir, as you must know I am not 
of a very great height myself and as 
you also must know, it is most dis- 
agreeable to have to dance with girls 
who are from ten inches to a foot 
taller than I. So now, I beg of you, 
please send me as my Christmas pre- 
sent a charming, bright, clever, snap- 
py little girl who is at least a head 
shorter than I am myself. Remem- 
ber now, please. 
Sincerely, 

Trouty. 



Dearest Santa — 

Please send me an ash tray so I 
can burn my letters in peace and com- 
fort. 

Yours remorselessly, 

Helen Lockard. 



Dear Santy — 

Oh Santy, I want a Digam pin just 
awfully bad! I've begged and beg- 
ged a certain youth to give me his 
and he keeps putting it off — won't 
you put it into his heart to give me 
one for Xmas? 

Anxiously and with much love, 
Edith Wise. 



Dear Mr. Santa Claus — 

Lois Hall asked me to write you a 
letter and ask you for the many 
things she needs. First of all she 



(Get yours in next week) 

wondered if you would bring some 
new furniture for the Reception 
Room so it wouldn't have that wash- 
ed out, bilious appearance. Then the 
big room is so high and bare and it 
could be made so attractive with a 
new rug, some pretty furniture, and 
above all, a baby grand piano. Lois 
said that was all she felt like asking 
for but I know one thing she needs 
most of all. That is one of those 
lovely Calendars of Desserts and if it 
wouldn't be too much, a Calendar of 
Salads would also be appreciated. 
Now Lois is a very lovely girl and is 
not at all pampered. So you would 
make her very, very happy by paying 
especial attention to her wants. 
Sincerely, 

Unanimity. 



Dear Santa — 

Please do send me some bangs. I 
do love them so! 

Harriet Harris. 



Dear Claus, Old Chap — 

For heaven's sake, man, send me a 
date for Christmas musicale. 
Yours in much trepidation, 

Speed B. 



Dear Santa Claus — 

Do you know I do wish that for 
Christmas you would send me a com- 
pany to command and also a new 
uniform — tailor-made serge — to par- 
ade the campus in. 

Cobe. 



Dear Santa Claus — - 

Can't you put it into some man's 
heart to give us a few new records? 
We are so tired of "Story Book Ball" 
and "Sunny Italy." 

Theta Psi. 



My good old Santa — 

Please send me the key to Frosh 
Wood's heart. Really, don't you 
think he's cute. 

Peg. 



Dear Santa Claus — 

Won't you please be kind enough 
to send me some real affection for 
"Gob" Spiedel. He's a "marve" danc- 
er but hanged if I love" him! 

Barney. 



Dear Santa Claus — 

Please send me Just a little more 
of that adorable Spanish rice — I sim- 
ply love it and we only have it eight 
times a week. 

Much love, 

Lois Hall. 



Dear Santa Claus — 

Old boy, can't you send me a 
chance to dance with Lorraine Mac- 
lay for my Christmas present? I'm 
keen for it but Fat always gets in the 
way when I ask her. 

Luce Legner. 



Dearest Santy — 

Would you kindly take pity on a 
timid dam-o-zel and send me a rem- 
edy for heart pit-a-pats? And money 
enough to go home on, soon? 

Marion Preston. 



Darlingest Santa — - 

Please send the men back to us! 
Love, 

The Lonely Co-Eds. 



Santa Claus — - 

Please send me a few good grades 
to take home to Mamma. 

Wop McCullom. 



Friend Santa — 

Would it be asking the impossible 
if we begged you to send us a few 
contributors who will fill up the aw- 
ful gaps in this paper. We would 
have them prompt, clever, and above 
all original. We have great faith in 
your powers and believe you will re- 
ward our confidence. 

With deep sympathy, 

The Stentor Board. 



L. F. May Have 
R. O. T. C. 



During the next few days the Fac- 
ulty of Lake Forest College will de- 
cide whether or not we will have a 
Reserve Officers Training Camp here 
for the remainder of the year. Pre- 
sent indications seem favorable for 
the establishment of such a camp. 



6S 



THE STENTOR 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



ysTBO WM AN'S safe milk 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 

BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telepkoi.es: Glencoe 70 Highland" Park 9 101-1(9 Vine Ave 



Alumni Notes 

From a very complete and satis- 
factory list of members of Phi Pi 
Epsilon now in srevice, we take the 
following items, chiefly about men 
not previously known to be in service 
or not located. 

1901. E. Russel Ray. Engineering 
Division, A.E.F., France. 

1910. Paul R. Stoltz, 

Harry E. Hurlburt, Sergt., Co. B, 
57th Engineers, A.P.O. 702, A.E.F., 
France. 

1911. Stewart D. Marquis, Lieut. 
Sanitary Corps, 159 W. 80th St., New 
York City. Awaiting orders. 
Wallace Graham, Lieut. 352nd In- 
fantry Supply Co., A.P.O. 795, A.E.F. 
France. 

1912. John C. Paskins, Lieut. R.O. 
T.C. Corps, Fort Humphreys, Va. 

1914. Robert M. Shields, Lieut. Co. 
C, 307th Infantry, 77th Div., 2nd 
Army Corps, A.E.F., France. In a 
New York regiment sent over in April 
last. 

James Ryerson Smith, Municipal 
Pier, Chicago. 

1915. Donald M. Rutledge. Was in 
301st Cavalry Band at Monterey, Cal., 



until August. Now in R.O. T.C, Camp 
McArthur, Texas. 

Edmund A. Hastings. 88th Aero 
Squadron, A.E.F., France. 
1916. J. W. Phellis. Band, U.S.S. 
Dakota, c/o Postmaster, N.Y. 
Frank Sumner Hunt, Lieut. In 
France. 

Ralph E. Krueger, Battery C, 72nd 
Artillery, C.A.C. A.E.F., France. 
N. C. Wetzel, 2nd Lieut. Motor Trans- 
port Co., A.P.O. 735, A.E.F, France. 
Has been stationed at Rochelle, and 
has been athletic director of a camp 
of 4000 men. 

1918. Howard C. Brayton. Went 
through Balloon School at Omaha. 
Ordered overseas just about Nov. 11. 
Robert W. Hughes, Lieut. Co. D., 
134th Inf., 3 4th Div., A.E.F., France. 
1918. Vincent Coleman, in Ambul- 
ance Service in Italy, A.P.O. Section 
527. 

1907. The address of Mrs. (Ora 
Whitmore) Williams is now Box 523, 
U.S. Postal Agency, Shanghai, China. 
1911. Edgar Cook is in France. 
Evacuation Hospital '10, with rank of 
first lieutenant. 

1913. Miss Bess McCrea, who has 
been librarian for the Northwest Steel 




Studio Open Sundays 

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Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 
NOTARY PUBLIC 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



TEL. 644 



FRANK BULOW 

Barber 

Under Jensen's Shoe Store 
RAILROAD TICKETS 



Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TR1EBWASSER. Prop. 
Phone 1 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



C. T. Gunn Co. 
Grocers 

Agency Huyler's Candies 

Curtice Bros. Goods LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone I7S 

Wb)? 
Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



17FTT-iI?T C"LT"V Succeliorto 

J\.UJDJC.J-«aJV I Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 666 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



59 



EMaUiihtJ IS71 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 
73-75 W. South Water Street 

Telephone Randolph I860 

CHICAGO 



Dr. C. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00p.m. to 

12:00 m. . 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



iiiiilllllllilliiiiiini 



£JLASS Pins and Rings. 
^"^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 
SPEIS BROS. 



27 E. MONROE ST. 

CHICAGO 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave. .Highland Park, 111. 



Gas 



■ 

For Light 
For Heat 
For Power 



North Shore Gas Co. 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
JVf elvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg 




rggttttgfl, Ifalhfl! 



77THE Joyous Season of 

V? Xmas is almost here-. Christ- 



mas that gladdens life and puts 
us all in the happiest of moods.. 

AND the one greatest Agency 
that instills the wonderful influence of 
Xmas in all minds is the store which really 
hrcomes the show place for the varied 
handiwork of Santa Claus. 

"All Are Welcome at This Store" 

"4£?" **8*r-& flu. irttewr 

Dry Gnds : Women 's 3 Children 's Furnishing 



Co., Portland, Oregon, recently left 
for overseas service. 
1915. Miss Ruth Upton is working 
for the government as an "Occupa- 
tional Therapist." At last accounts 
she was in New York awaiting sail- 
ing orders. Miss Nina Griffith is in 
the same unit. 

1915-18. We have the following bits 
of news concerning three members of 
the Stuart family. Victor, 1915, was 
promoted to a first Lieutenantcy just 
before the cessation of hostilities and 
is still attached to the headquarters 
staff of the First Division, Chemical 
Warfare Service. 

Charles, 1916, is now back at his 
home in Grand Rapids after his two 
years in Russia; he expects to visit 
Lake Forest in the near future and we 
hope we may hear of his experiences. 
Lawrence, 1918, went to England in 
August as an aeronautical engineer 
for the Handley-Page Company, and 
has been living at Manchester, near 
which town the Handley-Page factor- 
ies are located. He likes his work, 
but will not be averse to returning 
home. 

1917. Marcus Frost is a student of 
dentistry at Michigan University. He 
is married and has a small son. 
1917. Miss Lucille Ruffe was gradu- 
ated from Vassar in June and is now 
studying medicine at Michigan. 

1917. Edward Watson is a private 
in the 125th Field Artillery Supply 
Service, in France. He was married 
last year to Miss Alma Rauschen- 
berger of Grand Rapids. 

A lately reported death in the na- 
tional service in France is that of Os- 
car Jelling, who was employed as a 
janitor in the campus two or three 
years ago and who did particularly 
good service. He was attached to the 
engineer corps. 

1918. Zolton Irshay, who is the 
nineteenth of the Lake Forest schol- 
arship at the University of Illinois 
this year, is taking major work there 
in philosophy with minor in sociol 
ogy and psychology, as well as some 
work in economy and French. Ad- 
dress 902 Nevada St., Urbana. 
1901. William Mather Lewis, exec- 
utive secretary of the National Com- 
mittee of Patriotic Societies, is the 
author of an article in the American 
Army Gazette, entitled, "The Military 
School and the War," and reprinted 
as a separate pamphlet. 



L. GreeDberg 

ELECTRIC SHOE REPAIRING 

SHOP 

55 Deerpath Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Chambers "^^" 
Studio 



209 S. State St., Chicago 
Republic Bldg. 



; The 

Sheridan Cafe 

MARIAN H. CRAIG 

Two Good Places to Eat 
HOME and HERE 

10 N. Sheridan Road 
HIGHLAND PARK :: ILL. 



T he\^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



K QDA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsky 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson (Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision 'Dealers 



Grocery Market 

807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 

Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



fTT $65.00 takes my $250.00 

VII size phonograph, one diamond, 
^Ml one sapphire point needle, and 200 
"^ steel needles and records. All new- 
used two weeks. Act quiet. 317 Grtenleaf 
Ave., Wilmette. 

200 ft. from Linden Sta. Mil. Elec. 



60 



THE STENTOR 



Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllillllll! 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

a/LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C, the college work for the rest of the 
year will be reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — will be 
continued for this year; consequently the second term will open on Tuesday, Jan. 7. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; ?360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, 111. 




JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 
Phone 709We.tern Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicafo-Lake Forest Commutation 

Ticket* 

7 MARKET SQUARE 



C. G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 
Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning and Pressing $1.50 

Presiing ... . . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 



At 



French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 



Phc 



2252 



—J 



AMES MITCHELL 
E WELER 

Military Walches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Foreat, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Go. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 



OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, December 20, 1918. 



NUMBER 9. 



Charles Stuart, '16 

Tells of Russian 

Experiences 

On Monday evening Charles M. 
Stuart, of the class of 1916, addressed 
The University Club on the subject 
of his experiences in Russia, and the 
political situation there. Mr. Stuart 
went to Russia, in the same year in 
which he graduated, as a represen- 
tative of The National City Bank of 
New York. He remained there until 
September of this year, and thus was 
an eye-witness of the revolutions and 
counter revolutions, which began with 
the overthrow of the Czar about five 
months after Mr. Stuart's arrival in 
Russia and still continue at the pre- 
sent time. 

The principal theme of Mr. Stuart's 
talk was the Bolsheviki. This he 
divided into national and interna- 
tional phases. "The Bolsheviki", he 
said, "have nothing and want to share 
it with everybody else." In Russia 
their regime has brought murder, an- 
archy, and starvation. Yet they are 
spending great sums to introduce 
their system into other nations. He 
emphasized the danger of this pro- 
paganda and the necessity of allied 
or preferably world intervention. 
His opinion was that a dictatorship or 
other ' strongly centralized govern- 
ment, even a monarchy, is the only 
solution of Russia's difficulties. This 
statement called forth considerable 
discussion following the talk. 

Speaking for the students who at- 
tended, we can say that it was a very 
enjoyable and very much worth-while 
affair. On Tuesday morning, Mr. 
Stuart gave an extremely interesting 
account of some of his more personal 
experiences in Russia, and of Russian 
holidays and church festivals. 

Anne Cummings of Ottumwa, Iowa, 
and Angeline Giltner of Chicago, 
visited Rebecca Armstrong over the 
week end. 



Josephine Martin entertained Wau- 
neta Daniels of Watseka over the 
week end. 



Get Your Prom 
Date Now! 

Have you gotten your Prom date? 
If not get one now before you forget 
it. Only three more weeks of school 
and it's too late. 

Don't let holiday celebrating inter- 
fere with your coming back next 
quarter, for there are great things in 
store for you and the annual Junior 
Promenade given by the Junior class 
is one of them. Remember the date, 
JANUARY 25, 1919. It's the third 
Saturday after vacation. This is a tip 
to those who have never attended 
Prom, and also for the seasoned ones 
who have, it's going to be SOME 
PROM. War times are over and 
money is scarce, so start saving it 
now for your prom tickets. 

Remember: January 2 5, 1919. 



R.O.T.C. May Come 

As announced last week there has 
been some talk of establishing an 
R. O. T. C. unit here. Acting Presi- 
dent Wright has indicated in answer 
to an inquiry from the War Depart- 
ment, the willingness of the faculty 
to have such an unit established. The 
matter would have to be referred to 
the trustees before being definitely 
decided, however. The drill under 
the proposed plan would be similar 
to the system existing in the Land 
Grant Universities before the war. 
Every man would be required to take 
three hours of drill a week unless a 
sufficient excuse on medical or occu- 
pational grounds were offered. All 
military discipline would be confined 
to these hours. 



Lieut. P. M. Casjens was a recent 
visitor on the campus. Lieut. Casjens 
has received his discharge and expects 
to return to Lake Forest quite soon to 
complete his college course. 



Beatrice Worthley entertained 
Adrienne Stanfield and Louise Mee- 
cham of Northwestern Saturday even- 
ing. 



Glee Club Gives 
Christmas Musicale 

The College Women's Glee Club 
gave a very lovely Christmas party 
last Saturday night in Lois Durand 
Hall. 

A programme was given first with 
several numbers by the Glee Club 
girls. Mrs. Thomas the founder of 
the club, directed this year and gave 
us an idea of the good care the club 
formerly had under her splendid 
leadership. 

Miss Hazel Silver sang very beauti- 
fully and we lack adequate words to 
express our full appreciation. 

Miss Gereldine Massey's playing of 
the violin added much to the even- 
ing's enjoyment. She is a very ac- 
complished young player, her num- 
bers were greatly appreciated. 

Those who love the trombone will 
all agree that the selections played by 
Rogers Wilson, a visitor on the South 
Campus, were exceedingly fine. 

And there is splendid talent here 
on our own campus. Two of those 
especially gifted are Josephine 
Clarke, and Raymond Moore. Mr. 
Moore always delights his audience 
and is a big favorite wherever he 
goes. 

The Glee Club is very grateful to 
Mr. Gomer Bath who as accompanist 
added much' to the success of the 
evening. 

Dancing for all came after this 
programme. Both the big room and 
the dining room were used and also 
the big hall connecting the two 
rooms. 

We feel that mention should be 
made here of the feature dance given 
by Helen Barnthouse and her part- 
ner of the evening. It was a thing of 
rare beauty and grace and the audi- 
ence sat spellbound. 

The Hall has never looked so pret- 
ty as it did Saturday and much praise 
is due to Lillian Evans and her com- 
mittee. The little Christmas trees 
found in every corner gave one an 
atmosphere of Christmas. The soft 
subdued light made the loveliest ef- 
fect too. 

(Continued on page 64) 



62 



THE STENTOR 



Jen and Mary 

"Turn on the gush, let the slush 
flow where it may." 



In the beginning let it be under- 
stood that while we deeply regret the 
lamentably few serious attempts of 
the students at colyumizing, we are 
truly gratified with the contributions 
brot forth by our worthy faculty. 
Come again and make yourself at 
home. 



Mary had a cud of gum 
And it was white as snow, 

And every where that Mary went 
That cud was sure to go. 

It followed her to school one day, 
Which was against the rule, 

The teacher took it away from her 
And chewed it after school. 

Respectfully submitted, 
M. Bross Thomas. 



Mesdames Jen & Mary — 

Honored Ladies: 

Subsequent to considerable lucu- 
bration I grasp my stylus and will 
now proceed to emanate in a collo- 
quial, disingenuous manner. I fain 
would render justificatory my an- 
thropomorphic generalizations, but 
considering that dietetics so lugubrius 
might result in the coagulation of in- 
numerable cerebral hemispheres 
among your clientele, I will merely 
annotate in passing that the supplic- 
atory epistle to an individual, desig- 
nated by the appellation "Santa 
Claus," which appeared in your pub- 
lication some days since was spur- 
ious, apocryphal, and an abominable 
fabrication. 

Yours ambiguously, 

W. Chilton T. 



The snows will soon be going, (a) 
Beautiful spring time has come; (b) 
Little Birdies sing "Tweet, tweet!" 

(c) 
Sweet essence of Spearmint Gum! (b) 

Sib. 

Editor's Note. 

The beauty of this poem lies not in 
the melody nor the rhyme, beautiful 
as both these are. The fact that it 
is the Real Stuff is proven by the 
meter. You notice 

Line 1 — ta TA, ta TA, ta TA, ta 

Line 2 — TA. ta ta, TA ta ta, TA 

Line 3 — TA ta. TA ta, TA ta, TA 

Line 4 — ta TA ta, ta TA ta, TA. 



Dear Jen and Mary: 

Have you heard the story of Pat? 
It's old enough to have whiskers by 
this time; not that I think old stor- 
ies are not quite as much to the point 
as new ones, or that they do not 
quite as often fit the occasion much 
better, but unsophisticated young 
minds are prone to demand some- 
thing new. Nevertheless this time I 
will take it upon myself to tell you 
something I think is very much to the 
point even though it is rather old. 
[ have met the Irish people you know, 
having spent some weeks among 
them, and so I speak with authority. 
Of course you each have your own 
mind, and I do not in any way wish 
r,o bias your opinions for I want you 
to decide all things for yourselves. 
Nevertheless I will say this — but I 
believe the bell rang some moments 
since, so I will finish at the next op- 
portunity. 

Jerome R. 

Editor's Note. 

It was with deep pain that we made 
the discovery, just as we went to 
press, that one of our most respected 
and revered professors had commit- 
ted the one unpardonable sin — plag- 
iarism! It humiliates us beyond hu- 
man expression to be forced to make 
this cruel indictment, but as we 
learned the truth too late to repress 
the contribution we have had to re- 
sort to this mere explanation of the 
trouble. We refer to Dr. Thomas' 
poem which, we understand, he has 
fibbed from "Half-hours With The 
World's Greatest Poets." 



Believing that there are a number 
of men on the campus who have the 
right idea but are a bit bashful we 
propose to help them out. Try these, 
boys: 

L. L. to G. McL. 

I love you, I love you, I love you, 

Gert. 
Why oh why do you my feelings hurt? 
If you were not so coy and shy, 
Our love affair would then get by. 

T. A. B. to E. G. 

There is a girl who's oh! so noble, 
Her darling name is Eleanor , 



Just one thing in the world I need, 
For her to show some love for speed. 

N. McC. to M. Z. 

I love a girl, said blushing Ned, 
For her I'd just as soon be dead 
I'd die if aught should come between 

us 
Twixt me and dearest Mildred . 



C. E. J. to L. M. 

My heart would surely break in 

twain, 
If I should lose my dear Lorraine. 
What matter if my studies I shirk, 
She is my all, my college work. 

P. O. to E. W. 

I am a boy whom folks call Spuds, 
I certainly wear some classy duds, 
My sweater green, it hurts the eyes, 
Of all except my Edith . 

M. A. T. to L. S. 

Some girls think that I'm blase'. 
They don't know why I act that way. 
I've forgot all girls I ever saw, 
Since I met Lil, pledged Sigma Tau. 

P. S. to H. B. 

I'm a gob, but sure can dance 
I love a girl with fetching glance 
Her line my heart with rapture fills — 
I only wish she might be Phil's 



Red Cross Drive On 
This Week 

This week the Red Cross Member- 
ship Drive is on. This campaign is 
not for large subscriptions but for 
dollar memberships. Let's make 
Lake Forest College a 100 percent 
institution by all becoming members 
this week. In the words of the Red 
Cross — "All you need is a dollar and 
a heart!" Why not prove that L. 
F. C. has both? 

Lois Hall has already gone over the 
top. Every girl, all the maids and 
Le house man have paid their 1919 
dues. 



Sara Ross and Delia Babcock vis- 
ited Sigma Tau over the week end. 



Sara Moore entertained Mary Clay- 
ton of Northwestern last week end. 



Gereldine Massey spent Saturday 
and Sunday with her sister Gwen- 
dolyn. 



Madeline Hoover Ex." '21 is visiting 
Sigma Tau for a few days. 



Beatrice Worthley visited friends 
it Northwestern, Sunday. 



Fred Bates and L. C. Leedy were 
out from the Pier as week-end guests 
if Digamma. 



THE STENTOR 



63 



Our Weakly Skit 

Entitled 

GETTING A PROM DATE OR 
NEVER LOSE HOPE 

(Complete in this Issue.) 

Characters — 

(Prunella 

(Melachrino 
Time and Place — The Christmas Mu- 

sicale. 

Our hero and heroine are discov- 
ered comfortably seated in a secluded 
cozy corner during an intermission 
at the Christmas Musicale. It is their 
first date but they skillfully conceal 
this from the audience who take it 
for granted that they must be at least 
a campus case. An atmosphere of 
clubbiness hangs over them and Pru- 
nella is devotion itself to the object 
of .her heart's desire, Melachrino. 
whom she has finally captured for 
herself during an entire evening by 
inviting him to the dance. A -low 
conversation is distinguished. 

Melachrino (unsuspectingly), This is 
a nice dance, isn't it? 

Prunella (demurely), I'm so glad, 
you're enjoying it. 

Melachrino (catching a glance from 
under her veiling lashes), Of course 
it's you who makes the evening 
worth while for me, (with soften- 
ed tones), you know that, don't 
you? 

Prunella (succumbing to the honeyed 
voice), You say such delightful 
things. I'm so glad that I invited 
you, — Melachrino. (softly) 

Melachrino (playing up), Deep grati- 
tude- is mine. I feel greatly in- 
debted to you — in fact I can never 
repay you. 

Prunella (with hopeful tones), Oh 
yes, you can, don't grow despon- 
dent over your debt. Besides this 
isn't one of the very nicest dances 
of the year. There will be others 
much nicer so this doesn't mean so 
much. 

Melachrino (biting), I've heard that 
the Junior Prom is usually an aw- 
fully nice dance — I wonder how 
soon we can look forward to that? 

Prunella (with complacency) Oh, I 
hear it's to be very soon. In fact 
both my room mates have had 
dates for it two weeks. It's too 
bad there aren't more girls for I 
fear many of the men who wait 
will be disappointed — or will have 
to import. 

Melachrino, It's too bad more men 
don't have someone to put them 
wise like you have me. 



Prunella (taken aback), Oh — that's 
all right. I hate to see any one 
disappointed. 

Melachrino, You've such a kind heart 
— I wonder — 

Prunella (growing very impatient and 
losing hope as the music starts 
for the next dance), I'm so glad 
you appreciate my kind heart. (In 
icy tones and starting off). 

Melachrino (continuing), But wait 
Prunella — I was about to ask a 
favor of you. 

Prunella (very curtly), Well, what 
is it? 

Melachrino, I was just saying, I won- 
der if you would consider going to 
tlie Prom with me. 

Prunella (long pause — then with 
much enthusiasm), Oh! This is so 
sudden. I'll think about it and let 
you know after the next dance. 
Finis. 



Music School Notes 

On Saturday afternoon, December 
the fourteenth, the Music School gave 
a Christmas tea for its colleagues of 
Ferry Hall. By the happy light of 
fire-places and candles, an impromp- 
tu program was given, consisting of a 
harp solo, a piano number and several 
songs. We always have a warm wel- 
come for the Ferries and we have 
found them, as always, delightful 
playmates. We enjoyed together tea, 
sandwiches, cakes and candy. We 
hope to see the musical amateurs of- 
ten. 



RESULT OF PHONETICS 

Dorothy, at tea — "Listen to the Glee 

Club warbling!" 
Miss Lilly — "War-r-r-r-bling?" 
Dorothy — "Oh, I mean wobbling." 



North Hall initiated the new to- 
boggan from third to second floor. 
Ask Charline Bivins — s he nose 
(knows.) 



Can you imagine — 

Helen never practicing? 

Miss Milinouski playing the bugle? 

Miss Knaak getting a call from 

Great Lakes? 
Miss Morrow stopping with one cup 

of coffee? 
Miss Colton when the boys come 

home? 
Charline not fond of hot fudge 

sundaes? 
Vesta studying astronomy? 



Hannah singing 'n everything? 

Francilia pepless? 

Ruth Blumenberg with a steady 

eye? 
Alma missing anything? 
Ruth giving midnight serenade to 

2nd floor? 
Margaret walking during vespers? 
Miss Lilly speaking correctly? 
Dorothy not caring for "gym"? 
Miss Harris not trailing "Heine" 

Dorn? 



Music student remarking about 
scales — 

"Why these are grammatic" (Chro- 
matic) . 



Mystery in North Hall — Miss Mor- 
row wants to know who was in the 
water fight. 



Christmas is comin' 

We'll soon stop our strummin' 

And into a taxi we'll fly. 

We'll drive to the station 

And start our vacation 

With a sparkle of glee in our eye. 

We're fond of our school 

But bye-bye to its rule 

As homeward we wend our way. 

We send you our greetin' 

"Look to your eatin' 

Be happy on Christmas day." 

(With apologies to all readers 
of poetry). 



Oh That Serenade! 

As a very fitting conclusion to a 
musical evening, a before-the-S.A.T. 
C. old time Serenade was staged for 
the benefit of Lois Hall inmates. 

When the Strains of the new and 
old favorites were wafted through 
the night air to the ears of the 
slumbering damsels, they arose, and 
■-egardless of the frostily biting zeph- 
yrs, listened with spell bound enjoy- 
ment, broken by "Ooh, that sax — ," 
"Will you listen to that man with the 
horn?" and "Aren't they a marv?" 
until "Goodnight Ladies" died away 
in the distance. With sighs of deep 
content, the aforesaid damsels then 
hied them to their downy couches. 

Lois Hall would gladly give seven 
Christmas musicale a week for the 
pleasure of as many serenades, but 
hopes that such a measure will not 
be necessary. 

If gratitude and appreciation are 
any inducement the serenaders may 
rest assured that the applause Sat- 
urday night was but poor expression 
of the real feeling. 



G4 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 
Board of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '19. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. • 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Ralph Stewart. '20. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Otis Chatfleld-Taylor, '21. 

Paul OfTenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

James Crawford, '22. 

Howard Wood, '22. 

Prof. W. R. Bridgeman. 

Faculty and Alumni. 
Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffiee of Lake For- 
est. Illinois, as second-class matter. 



UP an' at 'em! A new day is 
with us!" Those are familiar 
words to those of us who 
have been here in other years. They 
constituted the traditional formula 
for waking a slumbering fellow stu- 
dent. Usually they were supplemen- 
ted by a vigorous shaking, a glass of 
cold water, or other physical aid. 
Tradition tells of how one man, who 
was fond of rising at five or six in 
the morning, used to stand in the 
gateway between Harlan and Black- 
stone, an hour before breakfast, and 
yell these inspiring words at the top 
of his voice until he had succeeded in 
arousing the whole campus. 

For the greater part of this quar- 
ter, this tradition has been superse- 
ded by First Call and Reveille. Now 
we return to it. And it may have a 
broader application than before. 
Why wouldn't it make a good motto 
for the rest of the year? 

The war is over, and the tension 
in that direction is relieved. Still, 
many problems have arisen out of 
the war, which it is our place as col- 
lege students to understand and aid 
in solving. Some of these are col- 
legiate concerns, some are of even 
wider scope. Change and progress 
in the reconstruction period are go- 
ing to be rapid, and if we are to keep 



up with the times, we must be on 
our toes. A new clay is with us. 
Now is no time to loaf on the job. 
Let us be up an' at 'em. 



IT would seem, especially in such 
strenuous times, that everyone of 
us should beengaged in some use- 
ful activity or activities outside of 
those pertaining strictly to the 
branches covered by our curriculum. 
However, it appears that we have 
with us still some members of that 
inexplicable brotherhood, or must we 
say sisterhood, who are too consis- 
tently busy to exert an ounce of in- 
fluence towards any kind of progress 
whatever. 

Same old song! We've heard it all 
our lives. They'd love to help in this 
or that, or in fact, in anything BUT — 
etc., etc. 

With these people it seems that 
college is missing its mark. Instead 
of helping them to a broader useful- 
ness, it is converting them, if we are 
to believe their version, into social 
parasites. They have time for noth- 
ing but to sap up the products of the 
labor of others. 

That seems perhaps, a harsh way 
of putting the situation, but the fact 
is, everyone is willing to reap the 
benefits derivable from our institu- 
tions, but Oh! how few are willing to 
put forth that supporting effort, that 
energy the individual would not miss, 
which could so easily put something 
vital and worth while into those do- 
ings and the institutions too often re- 
garded as the other fellows duty. 

Remember, the same "fellow" can- 
not shoulder the burden for the 
multitude indefinitely. Above all, re- 
member that this article is not in- 
tended to be applicable to everyone 
but you. 



VERY often, we are told, in the 
evolution of moral beliefs and 
practices, customs persist long 
after the reason for which they were 
established has passed. To be con- 
crete, the custom of shaking hands 
was merely a Missouri method of 
proving that a man's right hand, at 
least was free from weapons of any 
kind. This is a harmless custom, al- 
though unnecessary now, but many 
instances could easily be found of 
prevailing customs which are both 
unwise and harmful. 

When the Stentor was taken over 
by the girls of the college and moved 
bodily to the North campus, there 
was an imperative reason — the S.A. 



T.C. made it impossible for the men 
to support it. Now this reason has 
been removed and, while it is not in 
the least our desire to shift the re- 
sponsibility, we should like to share 
it more equally with the men. In 
spite of our efforts, we know that the 
news has been pretty much concen- 
trated around Lois Hall with only a 
sprinkling of news from the men's 
side of the campus. This state of 
affairs does not make for the best 
college paper and now that it is pos- 
sible, we want to remedy the situ- 
ation. 

It has been suggested that the 
paper be edited alternately by the 
men and women, one week by a staff 
of girls and the next week by a staff 
of men, at the same time leaving the 
business management unchanged in 
order to avoid confusion. It would 
yet be the aim of both men and 
women to make each issue, no mat- 
ter on which side of the campus it is 
edited, truly representative of the 
whole college. This system, we 
think, if properly worked out, should 
insure the much desired competition 
which would result in a far better 
paper than is possible under the pre- 
sent arrangement. 



(Continued from first page) 
Christinas Musicale — Concluded 

It was the most successful party 
of its kind in years and every one is 
sorry that Christmas comes but once 
a year. 

This is just a little note to the glee 
club. You did such good work Sat- 
urday night why not become really 
organized and enjoy the rehearsals 
for the rest of the year. We are 
already looking forward to the Spring 
Musicale. 

1. Hark, the Christmas Bells are 

Ringing Ward 

Glee Club 

2. O, Little Town of Bethlehem 

Traditional Melody 
Josephine Clarke 

3. Solo — A Birthday Song . . Cowen 

Hazel Silver 

4. There Were Shepherds. .Foster 

Glee Club 

5. Trombone Solo — My Heart at 

Thy Sweet Voice 
Rogers C. Wilson 

6. (a) Give Me to Live . . Herrick 
(b) Serenade Schubert 

Raymond Moore 

7. Violin Selected 

Gereldine Massey 

8. Solo — Cuckoo . . . .Liza Lehman 

Hazel Silver 

9. Holy Night Folk Song 

Glee Club 



THE STENT OR 



65 



Pass in Review 

Although it is all over now, we 
have recently heard two meanings 
for S.A.T.C. which we liked. They 
are: Sleep All Through Classes and 
Sit A Trifle Closer. 



The following touching scene was 
recently enacted on a moonlight, but 
chilly night: 

Helen: I'm cold. 

Phil: That's too bad. 

Helen, tenderly and with feeling: 
I'm awful cold. 

Phil: Here's my Pea coat. 



Hansen leads clubs as a signal for 
spades. This game of fudge is get- 
ting entirely too deep for us. 



Ken Berst: Hey, Phil, how's Vir- 
ginia? 

Phil: Oh, pretty well, I guess. 

Ken Berst: Whaddayamean, "I 
guess"? 



This was heard at the phone the 
other day: 

Is Sarah there? 

No? Then is Mil there? 

No? Who's speaking? 

Do you want to go to Hitchy-Koo 
tonight? 

All right, I'll meet you at the 6:23 
train. 



Cuckoo! 



Fat graced the Phi Pi rooms with 
his ample presence after the dance 
Saturday night. This novelty made 
the affair an unquestioned success. 
Come around again sometime when 
you're not too busy, Edwin. 



Around here S.A.T.C. apparently 
means "Stall Around Till Christmas." 



At that, Ned and Herrcke went to 
navigation at eight o'clock Saturday 
so as to be there in plenty of time 
for the class which begins at nine. 



Helen, to Whitey, "I just looked 
into your eyes, and then I couldn't 
dance at all!" 



Merry Christmas! 



"Puck" Eddy and Herbert Peter- 
son were Phi Pi visitors last week- 
end. 



William Wilkinson spent the week- 
end with relatives in Freeport. 



"Michy" Beddoes spent Sunday 
with friends in Milwaukee. 



The College Y.M.C.A. under the 
able leadership of Secy. Myers is plan- 
ning on a very successful and inter- 
esting year, beginning the first of next 
quarter. The cabinet has been organ- 
ized and will submit their nomin- 
ations to the student body for rati- 
fication within the next week. 



"Doc" O'Leary visited Digamma 
this week. 



Letter From 
H. B. Kauffman, '12 

The following lively extracts are 
taken from letters of Harlan B. Kauff- 
man, '12. 1st Lieut. Kauffman was 
commissioned at the Fort Sheridan 
R.O.T.C. in August 1917, and was 
sent first to Camp Lee, Virginia, to 
a Machine Gun Battalion. Later he 
went to Spartanburg to join the 2nd 
Anti-Aircraft Bt, and finally went 
overseas Sept. 1 of this year with Co. 
I, 56th Pioneer Infantry. 

October 11th. 

"It's quick moves we've been mak- 
ing since we left Wadsworth, — 15 
hours in the port of embarkation, in- 
stead of the usual week or so, 5 days 
in the rest camp at the French port, 
about a week billeted in the village 

of C , in the valley of the 

A , and now not quite at the 

front, but darned close to it, between 
the heavy artillery and the light, 
probably S or 10 kilometers behind 
the firing line. We were about half 
that a few days ago when we landed, 
but lines move in American sectors, 
and they move one way only. We are 
on the old 1916 French line, which 
had remained fixed until last month 
when the Yanks blew in and wiped out 
forever such words as fixed, and 
stable and permanent. . . 

When I got to the rail head on my 
way to join my regiment, after stay- 
ing behind to settle up my affairs as 
Billeting officer, the R.T.O. said, 



"Trains are pretty uncertain up 
through there direct, the quickest 
way really is through Paris." I 
knew at once that he was right, 
though it hadn't struck me before, 
and as my main desire was to catch 
my regiment with all possible dis- 
patch, I ran for the troop train out- 
side, and made the afternoon express 
to Paris from the next city, — one of 
those classy-looking, fashionably fill- 
ed compartment trains that used to 
speed by our ten-mile-an-hour troop 
train back in the days coming from 
the port city, the Paris Express, magic 
name — "Pour Paris"! . . . 

I can't go into details about Paris 
here, there isn't paper enough in the 
field desk. But it really is all that it 
was ever said to be, by everybody, 
and I had only 24 hours to find it out 
in, and had to be more or less on the 
move. As a matter of fact, I didn't 
go to bed at all, but that was partly 
because it took so long to get through 
the depot with its metres of red tape. 
You have to have authority to be in 
Paris (my travel orders sufficed me), 
you have to register in, be stamped 
by the Provost, put down where you 
intend to stay, get bread tickets, re- 
register every 2 4 hours. I went to 
the University Club, and they located 
a room for me at the Hotel Bellevue. 
I drove around a couple of hours in 
a fiacre (one has to be a tourist for 
a little while, for some things have 
to be seen once, anyway). In a way 
you feel at home in Paris at once, for 
nearly everything you see recalls 
something you've read or heard from 
childhood up. . . 

We put in the rest of the time at 
the Cafe de la Paix, right across 
from the Opera, the Cafe de Paris. 
Ciro's for tea, the place of Paris at 
tea time, where gather all the smart- 
est, both of the "best circles" and the 
demi-mondaine (you can't distin- 
guish), accompanied by the very 
smartest officers of all the Allied Na- 
tions. In the evening, the Folies 
Bergere, and its w.k. horseshoe 
promenade like the London music 
halls, and a gay little theater on the 
Rue Caumartin. A full day, and a 
most interesting one to a neophyte 
like myself, — and then off to Bar-le- 
Duc on a night train, enroute to No 
Man's Land. We might be in France 
a year and never see Paris, so I 
thought I was lucky to get in even a 
day. It was true to form, even to 
the rats, and the little chopped-off 
taxis that dart around 50 miles an 
hour and miss six a minute by a hair 
and never hit anybody. If you do get 
jammed, YOU get arrested for lack 
(Continued on page 66) 



66 



THE STENTOR 





STYLES 


THAT 


PLEASE 


for 


COLLEGE MEN 


and WOMEN 


RASMUSSEN 


BROS 


. BOOT SHOP 




Market Sq 


U ARE 



uslBOWMAN^ safe milk 

Perfectly pasteurized milK bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 ]fjl-lC9 Vine Ave 



(Continued from page 65) 

of agility. It was true to form, and 
then some! 

The regiment is scattered all along 
this part of the front. We've had a 
few casualties, already, and some 
close shaves. Two men in my com- 
pany wounded, and one captain had 
his arm shot off the day we landed — 
shrapnel. Another man in K picked 
up a bag along the road that proved 
to be full of German hand grenades, 
and he hadn't an unbroken bone left 
in him. We have to watch our step 
when we leave the road, the ground 
is full of unexploded grenades. The 
whole section through here has been 
fought over repeatedly, and looks like 
the pictures of No Man's Land, ab- 
solutely barren save for a few shat- 
tered tree trunks and stumps, and the 
remains of what were once the most 
attractive villages in the world, now 
piles of ruin, fallen in, and in some 
cases, overgrown already. The whole 
country is pitted with shell holes, 
with parts of the old trench system 
cutting through here and there. The 
ground is strewn with everything 



from bull beef cans to Boche helmets. 
Not a living thing save rats. You 
can't imagine a more desolate land- 
scape,, possibly. . . 

Outside of a cracked rib and mud 
from head to foot, I'm as fit as ever. 
The rib is high up, and doesn't mat- 
ter." 

October 28th. 

"Pete Hastings (Edmund A.) was 
here for supper with me last night, 
and I sent him down to his squadron 
in a side-car in the evening after a 
very happy visit; although, we talked 
seven-eighths war at that — the drive, 
liason — and I had a hundred ques- 
tions about his work. He is looking 
very well, and the same fine old boy. 
He is about 30 miles from me, down 
near First Army Hq. I'm going 
down tomorrow evening after recall, 
spend the night with him, and Wed- 
nesday go up with him for a flight. 
I'm keen. I can scarcely wait till 
then. Seeing as how I can operate 
the Lewis guns he carries for the ob- 
server as well as for himself, I'm all 
set, you see. 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



FRANK BULOW 

Barber 

Under Jensen's Shoe Store 
RAILROAD TICKETS 



The* 
Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSEP, Prop 
Phone 17 Lake Forest, 111. 



C. T. Gunn Co. 

Grocers 

Agency Huyler's Candies 

Curtice Bros. 6Ws LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F J HELD, Prop. 



Phc 



175 



Whs? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



ccessor to 
rry Levin 



KUBELSKY H s :, 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 



Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



67 



Established Wl 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 
73-75 W. South Water Street 

Telephone Randolph I860 

CHICAGO 



Dr. C.W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



/"^LASS Pins and Rings. 
^-^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 
SPEIS BROS. 



27 E. MONROE ST. 

CHICAGO 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave. .Highland Park, 111. 



!!!!|[!!!«nilllll!l!!llll!llllllllllll!!!!!li 

y^Y For Light 

I t/7 $ For Heat 
V^W'O ForPower 

North Shore Gas Co. 

Illllliiilll 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



ing Ice Skates 




For Every Member of the Family 

Toboggans, Skis. Snowshoes, 

Hockey Supplies. Etc. 

Catalogue on request. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

211-217 So. State Street, Chicago, 111. 




rggttttgff, JHolka! 



7JTHE Joyous Season o 

*'' Xmas is almost here. Christ 



mas that gladdens life and puts 
us all in the happiest of moods. 

AND the one greatest Agency 
that instills the wonderful influence of 
Xmas in all minds is the store which really 
ht-comes the show place for the varied 
handiwork of Santa Claus. 

"AM Are Welcome at This Store" 

lOMarket ^jp.tpt* & flTrt former ly Vleyer 
Square IKVUtl/ <\ \>HJ. & Dobson Co . 

Dry Goods : Women's & Children's Furnishing 



Alumni Notes 

1881. Died November 15th, Mrs. W. 
T. (Mary Warren) Elsing, wife of 
Rev. W. T. Elsing, pastor of the De- 
Witt Memorial Church, Brooklyn, N. 
Y., a sister of Aubrey Warren, '91. 
The family were for many years resi- 
dents of Lake Forest, and their home, 
which stood just East of the Acad- 
emy, and which has since been torn 
down, was always a hospitable one 
to students in the first twenty years 
of the College. Mr. Elsing is a grad- 
uate of the Academy. 
19 09. Louis Scott is now in the Em- 
ploy of the International Harvester 
Co., in the hemp production depart- 
ment. He has recently been made 
Supt. of that department in the North- 
west, with headquarters at Grand 
Porks, N. D., Address c/o Fibre Dept, 
Int-Harv. Co., Grand Forks. 
1910. We regret to report the sudden 
death not long since of Mrs. George 
(Clara Crawford) Sheldon, well re- 
membered by those of her own time 
as a woman of much beauty of char- 
acter, an honor student, a speaker at 
Commencement. We hope to print 
later a more adequate statement con- 
cerning her. 

1912. Edmund A. Hastings went to 
France in April, 1917, joining the 
French Ambulance Corps, later trans- 
ferring to munition camion, and lat- 
er still to aviation in the U.S. Ser- 
vice. On getting his commission he 
was assigned to Aero Squadron 8 8. 
1919-21. Raymond Ridgway has been 
in the S.N.T.C. at Mass. Inst, of 
Technology, Cambridge, Mass. (Ad- 
dress Box 199). 

His brother Kenneth's last address 
was 10th Regiment, Pelham Bay, 
Naval Training Station, New York, 
N Y. 



L. Greenberg 

ELECTRIC SHOE REPAIRING 

SHOP 

55 Deerpath Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Chambers 
Studio 

209 S. State St., Chicago 
Republic Bldg. 



inniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiEiiiiiriinmninniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuEiiiuiiiitniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiEiniiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiip 
m The 

Sheridan Cafe 

MARIAN H. CRAIG 

Two Good Places to Eat 

HOME«»(/HERE 

10 N. Sheridan Road 
HIGHLAND PARK :: ILL. 

IIllll!!!!!!l!llllllll!!!l![«U[[||||ll!l!!llllll!!!!lini!l!ll 







TheV./uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsl%y 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision T)ealers 



Grocery Market 

807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 

Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



e $65.00 takes my $250.00 
size phonograph, one diamond, 
one sapphire point needle, and 200 
"^ steel needles and records. All new- 
used two weeks. Act quick. 317 Greenleaf 
Ave , Wilmette. 

200 it. from Linden Sta. MM. Elec. 



THE STENTOR 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C., the college work for the rest of the 
year will be reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — will be 
continued for this year; consequently the second term will open on Tuesday, Jan. 7. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
?360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and .Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
"LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, 111. 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 



C.G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning . ■ Pressing ■ Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning and Pressing . . $1.50 

Pressing ..... 



5(1 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



Th 



J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 



Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m< 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ana 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



j. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Co. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 



LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 




The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, January 17, 1919. 



NUMBER 10. 



Dr. Nollen Honored in Italy 




"Of all overseas Y.M.C.A. service 
Dr. Nollen's work in Italy as general 
in chief has been the most success- 
ful." This report was brought to the 
students of Lake Forest College by 
the Reverend Mr. Parisoe of Laramie, 
Wyoming, who has just returned 
from active service on all the allied 
fronts. 
• Dr. Nollen's work in Italy has been 
unique in so far as it is confined sole- 
ly to welfare work, all religious pro- 
paganda being prohibited. He has in- 
troduced and organized a most satis- 
factory system of education and re- 
creation throughout the entire Italian 
army of three million men. Mr. 
Parisoe said in part, "In every par- 



ticular Dr. Nollen has carried through 
in a very wise and efficient manner 
the desires and ambitions of the Ital- 
ian military department. I have 
traveled with him over much of the 
Italian front and he was received 
everywhere with the greatest enthus- 
iasm and respect. He is introducing 
ideals of education and democracy by 
means of literature which he has pro- 
cured from Italian libraries and also 
by translations of books sent from 
America which he has had published 
in Italian. In this way he has done 
much to overcome the demoralizing 
effect of Austrian Bolshevism which 
was hindering Italian aid in the allied 
cause." 



Lieut. J. N. Rees has returned 
from Iowa City where he was a com- 
manding officer in the S.A.T.C. at the 
state university; and will complete 
his course here this quarter. He ex- 
pects to get his release from the ser- 
vice some time this month. 



Ensign Cy Karraker, '16, is the 
guest of Digamma this week. He has 
received his release from the navy 
and will re-enter the teaching profes- 
sion within the near future. 



Athletics Resumed 
at L. F. C. 

Athletics at Lake Forest univer- 
sity, which were discontinued by ac- 
tion of the board of trustees at the 
close of our last school year, will be 
resumed as a result of a recent 
meeting of the faculty. Provision 
has been made whereby the coach 
will be paid by the university, while 
the students and the alumni club of 
Chicago have guaranteed to defray 
all expenses of the teams. 

Charles C. Mather, the former 
Lake Forest athlete and well known 
English instructor until recently, has 
returned to us and has been secured 
by the faculty to serve as coach and 
athletic director for the remainder 
of the school year. Twenty-five or 
more candidates are out for basket- 
ball and the first game will be played 
with Beloit on our local floor, Jan- 
uary 25. 

This news will come with the 
greatest of welcome to former stu- 
dents as well as those in school at 
the present time. Our few months 
experience without athletics has prov- 
en that they are a necessity for the 
success and popularity of the insti- 
tution. The faculty have taken fair 
action on the matter, the student 
body responded nobly to the appeal 
sent out for funds to complete the 
year, and now let us hope that the 
board of trustees will see fit in the 
near future, to provide for athletics 
of which we all may well be proud. 
May everyone work for the good Rec- 
ord which old Lake Forest still re- 
tains in the athletic world of the mid- 
dle west. 



New Dean of Men 

By a recent action of the faculty, 
the office of Faculty Supervisor of the 
men was created and Professor Sibley 
was made "Dean of the Men," so to 
speak. This appointment is a re- 
cognition of Mr. Sibley's interest and 
influence on the South campus. 



70 



THE STENTOR 



Coach Mather on Athletics 




With the resumption of basket ball 
at Lake Forest College, athletics re- 
sume their former important position 
in the life of the student body. In 
order to carry on an athletic season 
it was necessary to raise some money, 
and the student body came loyally 
forward and agreed in a meeting of 
the athletic association to contribute 
a dollar apiece per month for the rest 
of the college year. This provides 
the association with approximately 
seven hundred and eighty dollars to 
carry on the basket ball, baseball and 
track seasons. It isn't any too much, 
but with the continued loyal support 
of the student body, we see no reason 
why the season cannot be carried 
through to a successful conclusion. 

The first call for basket ball pro- 
duced a squad of about fifteen men. 
Among them were, Sumner and Rees 
of last year's squad, with Maplesden, 



Lobdell, McCormack, Sieux, Chap- 
man, Nicholls, Noble, Rosen, Huff- 
man, Hale and Speidel filling in new 
positions on the squad. It is rumored 
that Scholz and Eddy are to enter 
college in the very near future, and 
if so they will add quite materially 
to the strength of the squad. 

At present the schedule is in a 
period of construction, but will in all 
probability include the regular games 
with the Little Five colleges. For an 
added attraction to the prom date, 
January 25, a game with Beloit is 
planned for the afternoon. 

Everything considered there is no 
reason for thinking that Lake Forest 
College is not on the map athletically 
and if each one of us gets behind the 
team and boosts his level best, we 
know the men of the squad will do 
their share toward preserving the 
athletic ideals of the old school. 



Sleigh Ride Party 

Last Thursday night, immediately 
after dinner, two dashing teams, each 
drawing a bob comfortably sprinkled 
with straw, drew up before Lois Dur- 
and Hall. An impatient jingle from 
the sleigh bells without warned the 
girls who were taking a last, long 
peek at themselves in their mirrors 
that they mujst hurry or be left. 
Finally all were loaded on and the 
driver cracked his whip. The party 
was off and a merry party it was in- 
deed. After having driven all about 
Lake Forest and vicinity, hands and 
feet began to get stiff and cold so the 
horses heads were turned homeward. 

Nothing of extraordinary moment 
happened during the course of the 
evening — there was not even an ac- 
cident — but it was a most enjoyable 
party for everyone who went. 



Dr. Wright Attends 
AssociationMeetings 

Last week acting President Wright 
attended a number of Association 
meetings in Chicago. On Thursday, 
the Presbyterian College Union met 
at McCormick Seminary. 

On Friday and Saturday he attend- 
ed the meetings of the Association of 
American Colleges. At these meet- 
ings one of the important questions 
discussed was that of college credit 
for war service. The war depart- 
ment's Committee on education for 
special training was present in a body 
in order to confer with the College 
presidents in regard to R.O.T.C. units. 



Edson VanSickle will spend the 
week-end with Digamma, 



Beauchamp Writes 
from Prison Camp 

Landshut, Bavaria. 
Sept. 25, 1918. 
Dear Professor: 

I am slow in sending my thanks 
for the Stentor which was received in 
France in August. The letters one 
may send from Germany are limited 
and it takes some time to inform my 
friends that I'm still living though a 
prisoner. Was highly pleased to get 
the paper and surprised at the large 
number of the boys in the national 
service. Would you please change my 
address to the above on the list if 
again published for news is the most 
welcome as well as the rarest comfort 
in a prisoner's life and we may re- 
ceive any number of letters. 

* * * * (Censored) 

He has attained the rank of cap- 
tain. You may be proud of his work. 
I envy him for being able to stay so 
long in the game without mishap. 

I am still a "loot" and in view of 
my present condition will remain such 
and condemned to inglorious idleness 
for the remainder of the war. But I 
had a happy time while it lasted and 
I presume it was fortunate enough 
that the machine was shot to pieces 
and not my own self. I happened to 
be some distance over the lines when 
I was cut off by a pretty decent patrol 
of German machines and they soon 
finished me. That night I had dinner 
at a German aerodome and as there 
is a kind of fraternity feeling among 
all flyers we gabbered away in 
French, drank beer, and smoked. 

* * * * (Censored) 

Our condition in the camp is not 
bad. Besides German ration with 
more or less regularity we receive 
British Red Cross food parcels. So 
we amuse ourselves spending much of 
the time around the stove cooking 
same or reading from our small li- 
brary. No getting lonesome. 

* * * * (Censored) 

This is a good opportunity to study 
German, which I am doing with more 
or less energy and being rewarded 
accordingly. But the place is not at- 
tractive enough that I should care to 
stay and it will be a happy day when 
I go back to study at the college, 
though this tour of Germany will al- 
ways be a valuable experience. 

Best wishes for the coming school 
year. 

"Very sincerely, 

F. E. Beauchamp. 



THE STENTOR 



71 



Jen and Mary 

By special request of the Royal 
Amalgamated Society for the Promul- 
gation of Scientific Fussing this col- 
yum will conduct a contest among its 
contributors and readers and friends. 
The direct object of this competition 
is to determine which girl and which 
man on the campus is — 

(a) The Most Romantic 

(b) The Best Kidder 

(c) The Biggest Sport 

(d) The Most Scholarly 

(e) The Best Dancer 

(f) The Greatest Heart Breaker 
Anyone may enter the contest by 

applying in person to Professor Sib- 
ley, the President of the R.A.S.P.S.F. 
or to Miss Maybelle Powell, Vice- 
president. You are requested to send 
votes to Dr. Frederick C. L. Van 
Steenderen, Secretary and Treasurer 
of the Society. 

In closing let us admonish all vot- 
ers to consider their decisions care- 
fully, voting not for particular friends 
but for the people best suited to the 
positions in question. 



MOONBEAMS 

Across the glist'ning waste of snow 

Fantastic shadows play. 
The moon looks down from silv'ry 
skies 

As I wait for dawn of day. 

I pine and sigh with aching heart 
And long for days gone by, 

But the moon only smiles at me here 
As I sigh for a love passed by. 
Flora Blackbird. 



Dr. Raymond, tenderly gazing at a 
five dollar gold piece — "Now this 
would take you and your girl to the 
city." 

Fat, "Huh, it would take a handful 
of those." 



Mac — gazing at several very ornate 
sets of teeth in a dentist's window, 
"Ah, ain't them swell? I must have 
that set — or do you like those others 
better?" 

Bea, "Come on guy, don't you know 
it ain't polite to pick your teeth in 
public?" 

Becky via Peggy via K. E. G. 



For those who have already broken 
or bent their New Year's resolutions 



we offer these suggestions from our 
star contrib. Sambo: 

Resolved: to serve butter at all 
meals, and salads at luncheon in 
the year 1919. 

Miss Hospes. 

Resolved: not to give more than 
three or four exams a week in 
Botanical Research. 

Miss Connelly. 

Resolved: to give my students in 
English 17 an entirely new and dif- 
ferent vocabulary so that they can 
understand my lectures in the year 
1919. 

Trouty. 

Resolved: to spend fifteen or twenty 
minutes a day in Lois Durand Hall 
during the year 1919. 

Bea Worthley. 

Resolved: to give Stentor Contribut- 
ors five minutes rest between con- 
tributions and sometimes to say 
"Hello" when meeting one of the 
contributors, rather than "Have 
you finished- your article?" 

R. Stommel. 

Resolved: to keep my eyes closed 
when I pass a room where the 
lights are burning. 

A. Hospes. 

Resolved: at least to breakfast in 
the hall during the year 1919. 
L. Maclay. 

Resolved: to call people by their real 
names rather than by their nick 
names. 

M. Horton. 

Resolved: to enter the chorus of the 
Follies for the year 1919. 
E. Goble and R. M. Hecketsweiler. 

Resolved: to break the two records 
"Story Book Ball" and "Italy" and 
give up our pleasure rather than 
the love of our neighbors. 

Theta Psi. 

Resolved: to conduct ourselves al- 
ways in a quiet, demure manner 
even when quiet hour is over. 

S. Moore and G. Massey. 

Resolved: hereby never more to use 
Sheridan Road as a speed way. 
Yea Bo! 

V. Wales. 

Resolved: not to worry people about 
their personal appearance and the 
cleanliness of their faces bv call- 



ing them Smudge when there is 
no mirror handy. 

H. Harris. 

Resolved: in the school term 1919 
to have the proper stage settings In 
the English 17 class so that I may 
play the parts more effectively. 
Trouty. 

Resolved: to cultivate a love for jaz- 
zy music during the year 1919. 
Miss Hamilton. 



Garrick Club to Give 
Play 

The Garrick Club's performance 
will be given next Saturday evening, 
January 18th, at the Art Institute. 
The club has done much rehearsing 
under the able direction of Mr. W. 
Chilton Troutman and a most inter- 
esting performance is to be expected. 

"Jack Straw," the first play to be 
given this year by the Garrick club, 
is a light society comedy written by 
the well known English playwright, 
W. Somerset Maughan. The author 
is an English writer of some repute. 
He is a physician by vocation but has 
written novels and plays. His first 
works were unsuccessful, at least 
theatrical managers refused to pro- 
duce them. In 1918 he turned his 
attention to entertainment rather 
than instruction and "Jack Straw" 
proved to be the first of his success- 
ful laugh producers. "Jack Straw" 
has been played successfully both in 
England and in America. It is the 
most successful of Maughan's plays. 
It is a delicate comedy and promises 
to be a hugh success. 



Mrs. Wright Entertains 

Mrs. Wright earned the honor of 
giving the "first tea of the year" last 
Monday afternoon when she, in her 
usual charming manner entertained 
some of the girls from Lois Hall. The 
presence of Mrs. Allee and Mrs. Cof- 
fin added to a most delightful after- 
noon. 

The time passed all too quickly and 
everyone declared that they had "nev- 
er spent a more pleasant afternoon." 



Horace Horton has returned to 
Lake Forest, after having spent his 
S.A.T.C. life in Madison. 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 
Hoard of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '10. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lyclia Spreclier, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Ralph Stewart, '20. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Aeries Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters: 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Otis Chatfield-Taylor, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

James Crawford, '22. 

Howard Wood, '22. 

Prof. \V. R. Bridgeman. 

Faculty and Alumni. 
Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffiee of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



MOST of us remember the old 
story of the man who had his 
sons gather sticks and break 
them. This was easily done until he 
had them bind the sticks into a bun- 
dle. Then the sons found they could 
not break the bundle. 

The other morning in chapel it was 
announced that Lake Forest would 
again have athletics. The Student 
Council had decided that each mem- 
ber of the Athletic Association should 
contribute three dollars per quarter. 
This was voted upon and unanimously 
carried. No doubt the three dollars 
will be forth coming at the proper 
moment. To be sure the girls are not 
represented on the Student Council, 
although the name might lead one to 
infer that they were, yet they are 
perfectly willing to cooperate with the 
men in this matter. 

Now this year the girls have taken 
over the business management of the 
Stentor. Perhaps the men have as 
much interest in the college paper as 
the girls have in athletics. Perhaps 
not. The men are asking for three 
dollars a quarter, and are getting it. 
The girls are asking for seventy-five 
cents a quarter and are, in many 
cases, not getting it. We wonder if 
the old man and the bundle of sticks 
suggests the best way of making a 
success both of Athletics and of the 
Stentor for the rest of the vear. 



THE year nineteen nineteen is 
with us. Life at Lois Hall so far 
has run along as usual. In fact 
the inmates scarcely realize that they 
have started in on a new year. We 
have all probably made some resolu- 
tions, most of which have been brok- 
en by now, but the Hall as a whole 
has not resolved on any improve- 
ments. There are two very important 
things that every one in Lois Hall 
should try and live up to. 

First of all, in order to make our 
life here a success, we should try to 
get rid of our natural selfishness, and 
come to know others who perhaps 
are very near us but with whom we 
scarcely ever are. They in turn must 
respond, and soon we'll find qualities 
and fascination in them that we did 
not know they possessed. Second, in 
order to do this, it is absolutely 
necessary that we abandon our nar- 
row, critical viewpoint. It might be 
well if we would all remember that; 

"There's so much bad in the best of 
us, 
And so much good in the worst of us, 
That it doesn't behoove any of us 
To talk about the rest of us." 

Certainly none of us feel friendly 
toward a person who possesses that 
unbearable critical air, that "look you 
over" attitude. Such a one immedi- 
ately arouses our dislike and antag- 
onism. So let us all try in the year 
nineteen nineteen, to make our life in 
Lois Hall more broad and pleasant, 
by knowing and appreciating others. 



Capt. Bridgman Returns 

Home 

Unquestionably the most welcome 
Christmas gift received in Lake For- 
est was the arrival home at noon of 
Christmas Day of Captain Ray C. 
Bridgman. It had been known to his 
family through the newspapers that 
he had arrived in this country but 
nothing was heard from him directly 
until a telephone message from Chi- 
cago just as he was taking the train 
for Lake Forest. He hadn't had any 
thought of newspaper notoriety. 

He came back in vigorous health 
and good spirits, hardly aged and 
sobered as many others have seemed 
to be. His brief five days at home 
were taken up socially with his fam- 
ily and friends, with interviews and 
communications by telephone — with 
friends of young men with whom he 
was or might have been in contact in 



France, and more or less with re- 
porters, which was natural enough as 
he was one of the early arrivals from 
the immediate front. He was called 
back to New York under orders, but 
has applied for immediate discharge 
and expects to enter Yale where he 
will be given his degree in June, al- 
though by going abroad in May 1916, 
he lost a month of his Junior year 
and all of his Senior year. 

His war history is briefly as fol- 
lows: Enrolled for training in French 
aviation schools about August 1st, 

1916, and went through the various 
schools with very complete and thor- 
ough training until about April 1st, 

1917. After serving at the front for 
about a month with a French Escad- 
rille, he was transferred to the Lafay- 
ette Squadron and was with that 
squadron until its break-up about a 
year later. With that squadron and 
later he had flying experience at prac- 
tically every part of the west front 
from the Channel to Switzerland. Of 
course he had intimate acquaintance 
with some of the best known flyers 
like Thaw. Lufbery, Putnam, and 
Xorman Hall. He was commissioned 
captain in the American Army about 
February 1st, 1918, but remained 
with the Lafayette Squadron for some 
months until the American units were 
shaped up. About August 1st, he was 
nut in command of the 22nd Aero 
Squadron which took active part in 
the American fighting at St. Mihiel 
an.i in the Argonne advance. The 
squadron had 42 official victories over 
German planes to its credit, with a 
number of balloons, though at the sad 
cost of 12 of its original members. 

Captain Bridgman has the Amer- 
ican record for flight hours over the 
German lines, something ever 600. 
He was recommended for major but 
the coming of the armistice held up 
the appointment like that of many 
others. He had four official victories 
and four unofficial victories to his 
credit. One more official victory 
would have made him an "Ace". We 
hope that he may be in Lake Forest 
about Easter time and at that time 
tel; us something of his experience. 



"Puck" Eddy called on Phi Pi last 
Sunday and made known his inten- 
tion to re-enter school within a very 
short time. He is still located at the 
Great Lakes but expects to receive his 
discharge very soon. 



Harriet Harris spent Friday even- 
ing with Margaret Schwittay '18 in 
Glen Ellyn. 



THE STENTOR 



7? 



Letter from Ensign 
Gilroy 

Extract of a letter received from 
Ensign Gilroy, written December 14th 
from New York City. 

We arrived in New York early this 
morning, but didn't make a dock un- 
til afternoon. It was a very slow re- 
turn trip, the strong prevailing west- 
erlies with heavy seas, prevented us 
from making any speed, one day we 
only made 105 miles in 24 hours. We 
certainly would be a speed craft on 
the Erie Canal! We went over in a 
convoy composed of 40 cargo ships, 
a cruiser as our ocean escort. I am 
sorry that we didn't see any subs, oc- 
casionally we received war warnings 
as to certain dangerous localities and 
did a great deal of zigzagging but 
didn't sight anything. After five 
days out we hit some terrific storms, 
part of the time on your head, the 
other 507c distributed unevenly about 
your anatomy. It was a great experi- 
ence but I didn't get seasick and none 
of these six meals a day — three down 
and as many up. We pulled into 
Brest for overnight, then received or- 
ders to unload at St. Nazaire, a sea- 
port ISO miles south . St. Nazaire is 
a hard shell old seaport used by the 
U. S. to unload cargo and now our 
military men run the city. Every 
place and street was filled with our 
men from all branches of the service. 
The men did not seem to fill in with 
the old stone buildings and narrow 
dirty streets, the whole city looked 
unfamiliar with it occupants. Of 
course, there are many French women 
and children dressed usually in black, 
because of the loss of husbands and 
brothers. The German prisoners with 
their green coats would also attract 
attention to a newcomer, they seemed 
so satisfied, I doubt if many go back. 
We stayed there eleven days and then 
put out to sea for our home port. 
We took the long southern route 
(4000 miles instead of 3000) going 
below the Azores before turning west 
The weather was stormy but the air 
was at a temperature of 70 most of 
the time, so it was not half bad. We 
had a very nice Thanksgiving and 
games afterward on deck. 

I was glad to get your letter upon 
arriving in port yesterday. Had a 
very slow and stormy return trip 
taking the long southern route but 
enjoyed it all. We spent Thanksgiv 
ing below the Azores, warm but a 
dark overcast day. We had games on 
deck to entertain the crew. Every- 
body seemed to enjoy it. 



I am glad to hear the women are 
taking hold of the Stentor; from now 
on they will undoubtedly assume 
more responsibilities in running the 
school's activities. 

I wish you all a most Merry Christ- 
mas and hope it will be a successful 
New Year for Lake Forest. I believe 
and hope each student will put forth 
stronger efforts than ever before to 
make Lake Forest great. Now the 
war is over, there is bound to be a 
keener competition among the col- 
leges and we must not lag behind. 

Waiting to receive some Stentors, 
Edwin L. Gilroy '18. 
New York, Dec. 13. 
Address 

U.S.S. Wachusett, 
c/o Postmaster, N. Y. 



Mr. Bitmap's Impressions 
of California 



Dec. 29th, 1918. 

"We are deeply in love with va- 
rious parts of California, that we 
have so far visited. It is the land of 
sunshine, flowers, fruits and balmy 
breezes. I know it is not December 
^s this is June weather. 

"Los Angeles is a large city — over 
six thousand people live in it. It is 
surrounded with mountains and some 
are snow capped. Its picturesque 
streets, its homes artistic, and its 
lawns are green and intersperced 
with flowers and fruit trees, mostly 
of the citrus variety. 

"We have had a long motor ride 
with Sam Brearley who kindly took 
us to Pasadena where we saw Mrs. 
Reid and Mrs. Barnes. Then we 
went out to his orange ranch; it is a 
ranch of 3 5 acres, containing fruit 
bearing trees, each one of which is 
loaded with fruit of which some is 
now being marketed. We ate ripe 
oranges which we plucked from the 
trees — a most enjoyable treat for us 

"Our friends here saw in the Los 
Angeles Times that Ray had landed 
in Philadelphia and I am hoping to 
find a copy of that paper to forward 
to you. 

"Tomorrow we are to begin house- 
keeping at 463 Gartford Ave., where 
we have an apartment. How long we 
will stay in this apartment I do not 
know. If we like it here we will 
stay during our sojourn in Los An- 
geles." 

W. L. Burnap. 



Alumni Notes 

189G. Died in Chicago recently 
Laurence Oliver, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
A. V. Jackson, aged 6. 

1899. John Kemp has returned from 
France, where he has had important 
duties in government construction 
work, and is now at his home in 
Kewanee. 

1915. George Brombacher received 
his discharge recently but will remain 
in the Bureau of Standards at Wash- 
ington under Civil Service temporar- 
ily. 

1916. Adolph Johnson, 1st Lieut., 
attached to 42nd Infantry, has gone 
to Camp Upton, L. I., with that out- 
fit, leaving Camp Devens about two 
weeks since. 

1917. In a recent bulletin Lieut. 
Leonard Holden was reported as 
severely wounded. 

1918. Chester R. Davis, 1st Lieut., 
320th Infantry, was severely wound- 
ed in the chest and shoulder while 
"K" Company of that outfit, which he 
was commanding at the time, was 
making an advance on November 1, 
1918. He is now in a hospital at 
Contieuxville. 

1918. Samuel Isa at last accounts 
was in the British service in England. 
During the influenza epidemic he as- 
sisted in a hospital there. 

1919. Geo. F. Moulton writes that 
he has received a temporary appoint- 
ment to the Bureau of Standards in 
Washington, which may be made per- 
manent under the Civil Service. In 
this case he may be able to go on to 
a degree by work at the George Wash- 
ington University. 

1920. Weber Runkel enlisted Aug- 
ust 13, 1918, and has been at Camp 
Hancock, Ga., in Machine Gun Com- 
pany 5, Group I, until his discharge 
January 12. 

Mr. and Mrs. Burt Kennedy have gone 
to South America to make their home 
there. We understand that Mr. Ken- 
nedy is to have charge of the Swift 
& Co. South American business. 

Lieut. Hiram E. Beard has taken a 
house at Great Lakes and will hence- 
forth reside "in the station." George 
Beard, who has been in training for 
aviation at Kelly Field has received 
his discharge and returned home re- 
cently. 



74 



THE STENTOR 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



use_BO WM AN'S safe milk 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 

BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Hi'gLland Park 9 101-1C9 Vine Ave 



Harry Batcher '16 
Writes 

We take pleasure in including an 
extract from a letter from Harry 
Batcher who was a member of the 
class of 1916 up to the end of the 
junior year, but enlisted in the Ma- 
rines in the summer of 1915. He 
saw considerable service in American 
waters off Guatemala and San Dom 
ingo, but went to France early in the 
war and was severely wounded at 
Belleau Woods. His address is Sergt. 
H. W. Batcher, Co. L. 5th Regt, U.S. 
M.C., American E. F. 

"I don't intend to make this very 
long as I feel it will not be very many 
months until I will be in the old home 
town in person and then we can have 
a real old chat. 

"The censor is supposed to be more 
lenient now-a-days, so I will put in a 
little more than before, although it 
does not seem quite right, as I keep 
forgetting that I am allowed to say 
almost what I wish. 

"Probably you have often figured 
out from the papers just what I was 
doing but I guess you did not hit it 



very close. Suffice to say I have been 
very busy and during my visit to 
France I have seen most of it. I spent 
two months in the trenches before 
Verdun. I was at Belleau Woods 
with the rest of the marines during 
June, but got in the way of a Boche 
machine gun, so I had a nice trip to 
the hospital. Later I was in the big 
push on Soissons and also in the Ar- 
gonne in the latter part of the big 
fight there. All the way through, 
however, I seem to have been favored 
by some special protection, as I cer- 
tainly came through some tight holes 
where it would seem impossible for a 
blade of grass to stand, let alone a 
man. Also I have visited the other 
part of France. Naturally I have 
been in Paris, in fact I spent five days 
looking over the place. Some parts 
of France are certainly pretty and 
some, well, they seem rather desolate. 
But I will take the good old U. S. for 
any of it at present, although this 
would not be a bad place to live in 
peace time. At present I am at school 
and my outfit is somewhere in Ger- 
many, but I think I will be back with 
them soon and then I will tell you 
something of the Rhine." 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 



Gents ' Furnishings 
NOTARY PUBLIC 



TEL. 644 



LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



FRANK BULOW 

Barber 

Under Jensen's Shoe Store 
RAILROAD TICKETS 



Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSER. Prop. 
Phone I 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



C. T. Gunn Co. 
Grocers 

Agency Huyler's Candies 

Curtice Bros. Goods LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD. Prop. 
Phone 175 

Why? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 
O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



IffTRPTT ClfV Successor to 

JVLJOJC/l^aJV I Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



75 



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Co. 

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73-75 W. South Water Street 

Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



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Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



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Telephone 1071 



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Wholesale Candies 



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Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest' t only exclusive 
Dry Goods Store 




Dry Goods 



^fShopfor 
^Womens&Childrens Furnishings 

Sooth Side of "Market Square" 



Spalding Ice Skates 




For Every Member of the Family 

Toboggans, Skis, Snowsho^r, 
Hockey Supplies, E:c. 

Catalogue on request. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

211-217 So. State Street, Chicago, III. 



Personals 



Theta Psi attended a luncheon at 
the LaSalle Saturday. 

Mildred Gerlach entertained Mar- 
gorie McCullum, Beatrice Worthley 
and Helen Barnthouse at her home in 
Chicago, over the week end. 

Sigma Tau gave a luncheon and 
theatre party Saturday. 

Virginia Wales spent the week end 
at her home in Rogers Park. 

Madeline Hoover visited Sigma Tau 
over week end. 

Elsie Engel visited in Chicago over 
the week end. 

Margaret Mills was entertained by 
Marion Preston over the week end in 
Libertyville. 

Ruth Bridgman spent the week end 
in Chicago visiting friends. 

Dorothy Brown 'Ex. 20 is visiting 
Sigma Tau. 

Sigma Tau entertained Alice Doug- 
las '17, Monday and Tuesday. 



College Credit Given 
for Army Work 

The following resolution has been 
adopted by the faculty of Lake Forest 
College: — 

Resolved; that students who have 
left college since April 1st 1917, to 
enter National Service, and have en- 
tered and continued in that service 
shall, if they re-enter college on or 
near January 7, receive a full year's 
credit, if they do intensive work and 
maintain a satisfactory standing for 
the rest of the year. 

Passed December 19, 1918. 
and now effective. 



Chambers "Xff 
Studio 



209 S. State St., Chicago 
Republic Bldg. 



. The 

Sheridan Cafe 

MARIAN H. CRAIG 

Two Good Places to Eat 
HOME and HERE 

10 N. Sheridan Road 
HIGHLAND PARK :: ILL. 



The v^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsky 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 



Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision Dealers 



Grocery Market 

807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 
Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



S\74 00 takes beautiful new 

*P* '* $250.00 mahogany finish 

phonograph and records. Never used. 
60 inches high. Latest design. Will ship 
C. O. D. on approval. 

Mrs. Waverly Brown 

317 Grecnleif Ave., Wilmetle, Illinoii 



76 



THE STENTOR 



BBBIIHi 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C, the college work for the rest of the 
year will be reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — will be 
continued for this year; consequently the second term will open on Tuesday, Jan. 7. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mecfianical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, 111. 



iidlllilll! 



...liniliii 



IliilHIIiSilllllllilllill! 






JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 
Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 

C. G. Wenban & Son 
Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing ■ Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning and Pressing 
Pressing .... 



$1.50 
50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 

WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



Th 



J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 



Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ana 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



j. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. 1 1. Hussey & Go. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All brauches^nsurance written 

Phones'. Office 160* Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, January 24, 1919. 



NUMBER 11. 



Why Not a Forester? 

Long ago, "before the war," it was 
a custom at Lake Forest College to 
publish a very complete and attractive 
book called "The Forester." The 
work in connection with this publi- 
cation was always done by the Junior 
Class and served as a memorial to 
the college spirit and loyalty of this 
class long after its graduation. 

Last year the Junior Class decided 
to omit the publication of the Forest- 
er as a war measure. This year the 
war is over, and yet at this late date 
no word has been heard of a 1920 
yearbook. The Junior Class is small, 
to be sure, and the Forester is a con- 
siderable undertaking but this should 
not be a reason for breaking a very 
old custom. Why not make a com- 
bination of the Junior and Senior 
Classes, publish a 1919-1920 year- 
book, and make it a memorial to our 
Lake Forest men who have served in 
the war. In order to make this pos- 
sible a joint meeting should be call- 
ed at once, and officers elected to 
start this work immediately. No one 
wants the Forester to be discontin- 
ued and the members of the class of 
1919 do not want the unhappy dis- 
tinction of having broken the custom 
for good. 



How About It, '19? 

"What's the matter with the Sen- 
iors?" 

"They're all right!" 

But are they? There seems to be 
something wrong somewhere. They 
have no class officers and have held 
no class meetings. The first part of 
the year there wasn't much of a class 
but since a number of the men have 
returned its size is quite respectable. 
So that excuse is insufficient. 

In another part of the Stentor an 
appeal is made for a 1919-1920 For- 
ester. A joint meeting of the Junior 
and Senior classes is suggested. Be- 
fore this takes place it might be wise 
if the Seniors called a meeting of 
their own and at least organized 
themselves. Then it might be pos- 



Beloit Game Sat. 

Basketball is going along at a rap- 
id rate and a team is being whipped 
into shape under the direction of 
Coach Mather. There are a number 
of men out for the varsity but there 
are not enough out to enable the 
first team to benefit from the prac- 
tice. There seems to be a feeling 
among most of the men that come 
out that if they do not play on the 
first team they are being slighted 
and refuse to come out again. Every 
man in the college, especially the 
freshmen, should feel it his duty to 
come out and work to make the team 
and even though he should fail in 
making the varsity squad, should do 
his utmost to give the varsity an aw- 
ful run for their position. 

In order to develop a first class 
team that should represent Lake 
Forest in their contests with other 
leading schools, not less than 18 men 
should be out every night for prac- 
tice. It is earnestly requested that 
every fellow having any experience or 
aptitude for basketball come out at 
once. Some of the promising candi- 
dates for the varsity are Jack Rees, 
Stu Eddy, Dooley Sumner, McCor- 
niick, Maplesden, Huffman, Lobdell, 
and Dave Rees. 

Coach Mather has drawn up a 
schedule and the following games 
will be played: 

L. P. Academy, Jan. 21 

Beloit at Lake Forest Jan. 2 5 

U. of Chicago at Chicago Jan. 28 

Knox at Lake Forest Feb. 3 (Mon). 
Lake Forest at Monmouth Feb. 14 
Lake Forest at Knox Feb. 15 

Lake Forest at Naperville Feb. 29 
Lake Forest at Milwaukee (during 

Feb.) 
Lake Forest at Beloit March S 

Naperville at Lake Forest Mar. 15 

We play Beloit on Saturday after- 
noon of this week and every one 
should be out to "Hang it on Beloit." 
Let's go! ! ! 



sible to combine with the Juniors, 
who have already elected their offi- 
cers, and produce a successful For- 
ester. 



Jack Straw 

a Hugh Success 

Garrick Club made its first bow of 
the season Saturday night in "Jack 
Straw" to a large and expectant au- 
dience. The college has been in-^ 
dulged in years past by the club's 
habit of dropping into drama casu- 
ally almost any week end. This 
year there have been four months 
with no play at all and interest has 
been sharpened by the long arid wait. 

There was also a rumor abroad 
that "Jack Straw" was to be a much 
more ambitious affair than the pre- 
lude of one-act plays w)ith which 
Garrick usually opens the season. 
The rumor materialized on actual in- 
spection. "Jack Straw',' is not 
heavy but it is long. It requires a 
deft, even touch and much attention 
to detail. 

The requirements of scenery are 
not to be satisfied w(ith a Jones' 
arrangement of two square pillars 
and a pair of steps for a background. 
To the credit of the club be it said 
that the ancient scenery was cleverly 
disposed and the English country so- 
ciety it sheltered was not disgraced by 
it. And as to the make-up and cos- 
tumes their perfection was marred by 
only one doubt — is or is not a vicar 
of the Church of England distin- 
guished from his parishioners only by 
the white sox he wears with evening 
dress? One wonders. The myster- 
ies of English dress may be as great 
as those of the English accent. 

Miss Merner was as usual the 
charming ingenue, a part which she 
plays with considerable intelligence. 
Miss McClay was also so young and 
fair that it was difficult to remember 
that she was a widow with two boys 
at Eton. Miss Massey, as the snob- 
bish vixen, played admirably through- 
out. She takes her part and keeps 
it without relapses. 

Mr. Offenheiser as the all-impor- 
tant Jack Straw, who might be a 
waiter or might be an archduke, car- 
ried himself with a royal air worthy of 
either occupation. Mr. Stewart, who 
took the ungrateful part of family 
(Continued on next page.) 



78 



THE STENTOR 



Jack Straw a Success 

(Continued from first page.) 

friend and general background played 
concientiously. 

Mention should be made of the re- 
markable trio of voices: Mr. 
Johnson's cyclonic roar; Mr. Moore's 
truly English unintelligibility and 
Mr. Huffman's train-announcer ca- 
dences. All delighted the audience, 
which could only have been better 
pleased if Mr. Moore had added a 
lyric. Moore without a song is 
about as unthinkable as Chauncey 
Olcoh so deprived. 

In spite of the numerous disturb- 
ances of the year the club has a 
surprisingly large nucleus of old 
players; add to them the new mem- 
bers making their debut and Mr. 
Troutman should have a capable set 
for other plays. 

Jack Straw — Paul Offenheiser-'21 

Mr. Parker-Jennings — 

C. Edwin Johnson-'21 

Mrs. Parker-Jennings — - 

Gwendolyn Massey-'19 
Vincent — Myron Thayer-' 2 2 
Ethel — Anne Merner-'20 

Ambrose Holland — Ralph Stewart-'20 
Lady Wanley — Lorraine McClay-'21 
Lord Serlo — Raymond Moore-'21 
Count Adrian von Bremer — 

Philip Speidel-'19 
Horton Withers — Lucius Legner-'20 
Mrs. Withers — Gertrude Gifford-'22 

The Rev. Lewis Abbott — 

Dean Barrick-'2 2 

Rosie Abbott — Elsie Engel-'22 

Footman — Vernon Huffman-'21 

Waiter — Russell Rice-'22 



An Appreciation 

One hears it everywhere but per- 
haps it might be well to let it re-echo 
through the columns of the Stentor. 
The great amount of praise and grati- 
tude due Mr. Troutman, as director 
of the Garrick Club, in having suc- 
cessfully carried through the produc- 
tion of Jack Straw against baffling 
odds and what seemed at times to be 
an adverse fate. Everyone seems to 
feel and to appreciate it. But while 
the success of production is Mr. 
Troutman's, the satisfactory financial 
management is due to Ralph Stewart, 
who worked so faithfully to carry out 
his responsibilities. To both much 
credit is given and hopes run high 
for a memorable year in the history 
of the Garrick Club. 



"Go-To-Church" 
Sunday 

Last week we reaped the fruits of 
our Presidents visit to the meetings 
of the Association of American Col- 
leges, when he spoke in chapel re- 
garding the failure of many of us to 
attend church at least once a week. 
He urged many excellent reasons up- 
on us, last and not least of which, 
was the fact that it looks well to be 
seen there. The results, to put it 
mildly were overwhelming. Lois 
Durand sallied forth en masse. 
Scarcely a girl was left in the dor- 
mitory. Then, too, there was a won- 
derful representation from the south 
campus. Pew after pew was filled 
with college men and women. The 
sight must have been a surprising 
if not an inspiring one to Mr. Roberts. 
This last remark reminds us of a 
joke we once heard. After John had 
taken Mary home from the movies, 
he accidently, on purpose, kissed her 
on the cheek. She jumped away in 
feigned surprise, exclaiming — "My, 
how you frightened me." Several 
minutes went by and then Mary lean- 
ed toward John and whispered — 
"Frighten me again." 

Is Mr. Roberts saying, "Inspire me 
again"? 



Undoubtedly Prom will be a very 
lovely affair this year, but who 
knows? Rather who will know? Cer- 
tainly not many of the Lois Hall 
girls are getting in on it. Ask the 
imported girls and you can get all 
the data. 

It might be well if there were a 
wing built on to Lois Hall in which 
to house the girls who are imported 
for the dances. Or maybe the Lois 
Hallers would be willing to vacate 
over the week ends and thus provide 
room for the visitors. We'll be quite 
willing to do either, if when the time 
comes for the Lois Hall dance, the 
men will be willing to get out so that 
the imported men will have a place 
to stay. It might not be a bad idea 
at that time to pitch tents on the 
south side of the campus into which 
the college men can move, thus leav- 
ing room for the guests in their com- 
fortable quarters. Thanks! we're 
much obliged! 

Of course we realize that Prom is 
given with the purpose of giving the 



New Men Back 

A number of men who have been 
in service have come back to school. 
There are rumors of more to come, 
but up-to-date the list is as follows: 

Robert Burchell '19 — has been at 
the Massachusetts school of Technol- 
ogy, Boston. 

James Henshaw '19 — Camp Graut. 

John Rees '19 — Lieut, in S.A.T.C. 
at Iowa State University, Iowa City. 

Carson Hoover '19 — Lt. at camp 
Zachery Taylor. 

Raymond Moore '20 — Y.M.C.A. at 
Great Lakes. 

Stuart Eddy '21 — Great Lakes 
Naval Training Station. 

Horace Horton '21 — S.A.T.C. at 
Madison. 

Francis McFerran '21 — Lieut, in 
Aviation at Taliaferro Field, Texas. 

Laurence Maplesden '21 — Lieut, in 
S.A.T.C. at Kenyon College, Gambier, 
Ohio. 

Kenneth Nef '21 — Lieut, at Camp 
Zachery Taylor. 

Webber Runkle '21 — Camp Han- 
cock, Georgia. 

A number of new men have also 
arrived, but the following list may 
not be quite complete. 

Dean Barrick. 

Robert Crawford. 

F. O. Hine. 

Charles Horan. 

F. M. Thompson. 

Ezra Zoomaya. 



Unusual Chapel Services 

Chapel on Tuesday morning was a 
most enjoyable service. Mr. Sibley 
presided and announced that Joseph 
Black would give a short organ re- 
cital. He played Codman's "Dawn- 
ing," Beethoven's "Minuet in G," 
and the "Prelude and Fugue in D 
Minor" by Bach. His playing was 
most delightful and was greatly en- 
joyed by everyone present. 



Elsie Engel visited last Sunday 
with friends in Chicago. 

Geraldine Massey is now living in 
the hall. 



men a chance to bring girls from 
their home towns and show them 
college society in its full swing. 
However, strange as it may seem, 
Lois Hallers are interested in the 
event and hope the men will not 
hesitate to tell us all about it. We 
assure you we will return the favor 
in regard to the Lois Hall dance. 



THE STENTOR 



79 



Pass in Review 

The members of the supposedly 
fairer and gentler sex in Lois Dur- 
and Hall have certainly been dealing 
out some scintillating wit lately. The 
few samples appended below are all 
we dare publish this week. 



Helen: "I don't see how that story 
got out, I only told some of the 
girls." 

Professor Raymond: "Now who can 
point out Judas in the 'Last Supper' 
by da Vinci?" 

Mil: "I can, he's the one without a 
furlough." 



Eddy: "Jo, do you know John 
Smith at Illinois?" 
Jo: "Yes." 

Eddy: "He's a goof, isn't he?" 
Jo: "No, he's a Psi Upsilon." 



In the past we have had consider- 
able innocent fun at the expense of 
one Charles E. Johnson, but we be- 
lieve the time has come to record 
something to his credit, so here goes: 
Last Wednesday he was riding on the 
street car during the rush hour, and 
in the true chivalrous spirit of which 
we always knew he was capable he 
gave up his seat to two ladies. 



Ye ed of this colyum, Whitey, and 
Phil engaged in a great game of "You 
chase me awhile" with a couple of 
the denizens of the Hall on Monday 
afternoon. We lost. They found us 
every place we went. 



Fat and Phil had an argument as 
to who was the best dancer in school. 
The meeting adjourned when Fat 
said, "If you don't believe me, ask 
Maclay." 



We hear that Lorraine signed a 
petition for better food at the Hall. 
That's the height of something or 
other. 



We asked what was the name of 
the last piece Black played on the 
organ. Phil replied, "Tramp, Tramp, 
the Boys Are Marching." 



Dr. Wfjight remarked in chapel 
that college should be regarded as 
an opportunity for education, broad- 
ening the mind, and illumination. 
We will mention no names, but a cer- 
tain troupe of venders of "Fresh 
Fish", certainly have been specializ- 
ing on the last of Dr. Wright's points 
lately. 



An Expensive Even- 
ing 

A Tragedy in One Act 
Scene: — Suite No. 1. 

Time: — An evening and an hour 
when all normal girls should be dat- 
ing. 

Characters: — 

Miss T — The One That Isn't. 

Miss H — The Special Agent of the 
U. S. Government for Conserving Coal 
by checking waste of electricity. 

The curtain rises disclosing a 
lamp, with its shade tipped to one 
side, lighting the room — thus lend- 
ing a homelike atmosphere. In the 
south coop Miss T. is seen trying on 
its occupant's hats and forcing her 
trembling lips to whistle to keep up 
her spirits. After deciding she'll bor- 
row them sometime she leaves the 
room, failing to see Miss H. just out- 
side the door. 

Miss H. — (A grin of glee o'er- 
spreading her physiognomy — making 
the audience wonder whether she was 
left a million or had a proposal of 
marriage.) "One light, two lights — 
three lights!" At the last little 
chuckles of glee issue forth. 

"Wait, maybe they have another 
hidden so I can't see it going." She 
hunts behind the door as Miss T. 
enters. 

Miss T. — "It's not so bad staying 
in here after all. I'll pretend I'm 
waiting for hubby to return from the 
Elks. Aha, a burglar! No other 
than the fiend who stole my diamonds 
last week." Brandishes curling iron 
as she advances. "Miss H!" 

Miss H. — Seventy-five cents! Sev- 
enty-five cents ! ! Seventy-five cents ! 

Miss T. — There's nothing the mat- 
ter with your enunciation. Say, I 
was only gone a minute — you must 
have been waiting outside the door. 
I didn't think I sent out cards for an 
at home this evening." 

Miss H. — "I shall report you to Dr. 
Wright for impertinence. If you care 
to discuss the matter ask Mr. Rich- 
man. Those are his orders. Aha, 
an electric iron. Twenty-five dol- 
lars." Starts to leave the rooms, 
turning out the lamp as she does so. 

Miss T. — feebly follows her to the 
door as her mother has brought her 
up to do. Her lips are seen moving 
— vainly trying to count ten. 

Miss H. — At the door, "If you leave 
that room it will be a quarter more!" 
At that Miss T. staggers back, bruis- 
ing shins and easing her mind. 



Jen and Mary 

Royal Amalgamated Society for the 
Promulgation of Scientific Fussing 
Contest Closed. 

The results of our contest proved 
very close indeed. In fact Prof. Sib- 
ley insisting on recounting the bal- 
lots seven times before allowing the 
results to be published. 
Most Romantic 

Mildred Zenos 

Ernest L. Coberly 
Best Kidder 

Harriet Harris 

Lucius Legner 
Biggest Sport 

Ruth Kennedy 

Gomer Bath 
Most Scholarly 

Wop McCollum 

Albert Hale 
Best Dancer 

Lorraine McClay 

Alfred Plantin 
Greatest Heart Breaker 

Ruth Kenyon 

Doc. Burchill 



Any doctor with a course of lec- 
tures to give please visit Lois Hall — 
we simply adore company meals. 



Mr. Gould to Jack Reis — "Have 
you learned to count?" 

Jack — "No, sir." 

Mr. Gould — "Well, now you know 
all of the other young ladies have 
learned." 



If you want 

To lead a thrilling life 

Get the Flu — 

Seventy-eight flowers 

In the curtain, 

Thirteen cracks 

Upon the ceiling. 

Forty seven minutes 

Until time to 

Take another pill. 

Five panels in 

The door and 

Five drawers in the 

Bureau — O 

But this is such a 

Thrilling life, I 

Fear I'll lose 

My nerve! 

It's only for a 

Hundred years! 



It's heck to be rationed but it's a 
dog's life when you are raisoned, too. 

Sigma Tau entertained Alice Doug- 
las, Margorie Etnyre, Dorothy Brown, 
Sara Ross, Delia Babcock, Madeline 
Hoover, Mabel Etnyre, Carol Samp- 
son, Mrs. Marquis, and Mrs. Helfrich 
last week end. 



80 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 
Board of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '19. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Spreeher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Ralph Stewart, '20. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Otis Chatfield-Taylor, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

James Crawford, '22. 

Howard Wood, *22. 

Prof. W. R. Bridgeman. 

Faculty and Alumni. 
Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



THIS year, Lake Forest College 
was particularly unfortunate to 
lose through illness the services 
of one of the best liked and most able 
men ever enrolled on the faculty, Dr. 
John J. Halsey. In his place, how- 
ever, we were exceedingly lucky to 
get Dr. Raymond. Dr. Raymond is a 
man of great culture and is a very 
entertaining and instructive lecturer. 
He is giving several courses never be- 
fore given here, as well as some of 
Dr. Halsey's and Professor Burnap's. 
Attendance at his classes is, it seems 
to us, an excellent opportunity to ac- 
quire a smack at least of that cos- 
mopolitan culture in which, we regret 
to say, Lake Forest students are of- 
ten sadly lacking. That is, it would 
be a splendid opportunity if some few 
students did not presume on Dr. Ray- 
mond's good nature and regard class 
as a good place for social diversion 
instead of a place for acquiring eru- 
dition. Right now it begins to look 
as though it were to be another case 
of killing the goose that laid the 
golden eggs, for Dr. Raymond has 
now emphatically stated, that this 
sort of thing can't go on forever 
Let's see if we can't get together and 
show Dr. Raymond that we appre- 
ciate his good nature and make any 
radical disciplinary measures on his 
part unnecessary. 



SOME wise old sage of centuries 
past truly said that the way to 
a man's heart lay through his 
stomach. But alas! the sage forgot 
to mention that the state of a giro's 
disposition depends largely upon what 
she eats or does not eat. The girls 
of Lois Hall have heard vague mut- 
terings from the south ward as to 
their amiable ways, but we have 
borne it all, perhaps realizing part of 
the truthfulness of the accusation, 
but realizing also the cause of all the 
trouble. 

Now we cannot live on rice. True, 
the Chinamen do, but who wants to 
be a Chinaman? 

Spagetti was made for the Wops. 
Why should we be served at least 
four times a week with the despised 
dish? 

Each week we hoped that the next 
would bring us food, not camouflage, 
but alas, the weeks sped by and there 
was no change. In vain was the dis- 
approving tapping of feet at the ap- 
pearance of the left over apple sauce 
from the week before. The untouch- 
ed goulashes that were put before us 
made no impression. Even the ap- 
pearance of numberless pimples up- 
on our peachy complexions failed to 
impress the powers that be. We be- 
gan to grow thin. Our constitutions 
began to weaken under the weight of 
our daily grind without nourishing 
food. And then there came to one of 
our number a painful disfiguring boil. 
Then — we realized that the time for 
action had come. Patience had ceas- 
ed to be a virtue and we resolved to 
endure the outrages upon our gas- 
tronomical organ no longer. 

A prayer meeting was held so that 
we might be given wisdom to pursue 
the course that might perchance win 
for us a salad, or a steak. After care- 
ful consideration we realized that 
God helps only those who help them- 
selves. So we prepared a long, legal 
looking document imploring the 
Powers to give us more and better 
food, and started the aforesaid doc- 
ument merrily on its way. Oh, it was 
good to write our names boldly as an 
expression of the feelings that had 
smoldered in our hearts for so long. 
No signature was missing, and by the 
time our friends are reading this lit- 
tle account in the columns of the 
Stentor our petition will have reached 
the hands, and we hope the hearts, 
of those in authority in the domain 
of food. 



Gladys Reichert and Elaine Kel- 
log spent the week end at home in 
Chicago. 



Initiation Announced 

Theta Psi announces the initiation 
of Vera Pettigrew, Edith Wise, Beth 
Thayer, Helen Barnthouse, and Mil- 
dred Gerlach. 

Sigma Tau announces the initiation 
of Helen Hoyer, Sara Fisher, Flora 
Shattuck, Helen Lockhard, Rebecca 
Armstrong, Katherine Horton, Irene 
Farwell, Zelma Farwell, Lillian 
Stephens, and Mary Burnette. 



Chester Davis 
Wounded in Action 

Base Hospital 31 
France, Nov. 23, 1918 
A. P. O. 732 
Dear Father :- 

I am now strong enough to write 
you and as tomorrow is "Dad's Christ- 
mas letter day" throughout the A. E. 
F. I've decided to write to you to- 
night. 

I believe I told you before that we 
had been in considerable fighting. 
As a matter of fact we have been on 
the move since Sept. 13 when we 
were in the St. Mihiel drive if it can 
be called such. We really did noth- 
ing but hike as hard as we could try- 
ing to keep up with the retreating 
Germans and we didn't have a casu- 
ality in the regiment. 

After the St. Mihiel business we 
were pulled out and went into biv- 
ouac in a woods near Siully, from 
there we moved to a woods about 10 
kilos west of Verdun. The Boche 
shelled us there the night of the 2 5th 
of Sept. just as we were pulling out 
to go forward and take up our posi- 
tion for the drive which was to start 
the next morning. He got a couple 
of lucky hits. One of his shells hit 
right in the middle of my Bn. H. Q. 
Platoon and of course it disorganized 
things considerably. Another shell 
hit directly in the center of the N. C. 
O.s of the 4th platoon of "L" Co. 
and wiped out every one of them and 
"L" Co. was one of our front line 
companies in the attack too. 

Well finally we got the regiment 
out of the woods and reorgan- 
ized under shell fire which is 
very hard to do. It was one of 
the worst things that could happen 
to morale ordinarily but it made all 
of our men all the madder at the 
Boche and when we got into position 
in front of Bethincourt and were 
ready to "jump off" all of the men 



THE STENTOR 



81 



were ready to eat the Boche alive. 
Our artillery put up a peach of a 
barrage and we jumped off at 3:30 
and nothing could hold us. We went 
forward about 7 kilos that day and 
pushed on to the Meuse R. the next 
day. The work of the men was mag- 
nificlent. We took about 1,000 pris- 
oners, 3 field pieces and numerous 
machine guns. We were in that 
drive about 4 days and were pulled 
out for a slight rest. Then we were 
shoved in it back of Monforison and 
pushed forward to the Cunel-Brinells 
Road which is on line with where the 
Meuse takes a bend northward. We 
met a lot of resistance there and 
lost heavily from artillery and M. G 
fire. His "Whiz-Bangs" — 77 and 
88s — were especially active. After 
this engagement we were pulled back 
and filled up with replacements — 
mostly Ohio troops. 

It was here that I was put in com- 
mand of K Co. After a week's re- 
organization we went forward to at- 
tack again — this time in the north- 
ern edge of the Argonne Forest. If 
you look at the map you'll see that 
we have been giving way to the west 
with each move. We relieved the 
82nd Division and had the sector di- 
rectly in front of Buzancy. The 2nd 
Division (Marines) were on our right 
and the 77th Division (N. Y. Draft) 
were on our left. I with K Co. had 
the left half of our regimental sector 
and M Co. had the right half. We 
formed about 1 kilo back of our 
"jumping off" point for the Boche 
were between that point and us. Our 
barrage started at 3:30 A. M. on 
Nov. 1 and the Boche almost immedi- 
ately put up a counter barrage of H. 
E. and Mustard Gas with M. G. mixed 
in. I pushed forward at 4:45 thru 
their barrage and we had little diffi- 
culty in cleaning the Boche out. We 
got to the jumping off place O. K. 
and jumped off promptly at H hour 
which was 5:30. We pushed for- 
ward about a kilo easily overcoming 
the resistance we met but it seems 
M Co. had some trouble and were 
held up. Anyway we came to a wood 
on our right which should have been 
taken and cleared by M Co. Just as 
we got abreast of the woods a ma- 
chine gun opened fire directly on me 
and I dropped — shot through the 
back. He wasn't satisfied with that 
but kept sniping at me and got an- 
other thru my right shoulder which 
penetrated both my lungs and went 
down into my left side. I sent for 
my second in command and told him 
what had happened and he set out to 
clear the woods. In the meantime 
Tour stretcher-bearers came up to take 



me back. Fritz continued to snipe 
at us and killed two of them before 
we had gone a hundred yards. The 
other two got me back to our dress- 
ing station where they gave me first 
aid, a shot of anti-tetanus, tagged 
me, put me on an ambulance and 
sent me back to a field hospital, from 
there they sent me to Casualty Clear- 
ance No. 10. Here they operated on 
me and took the bullet out my back 
— I have that now. 

From here they put me on a Red 
Cross train and sent me back to my 
present location. I don't remember 
much of the first week but the Doc- 
tor and Nurses tell me that I came 
pretty near dying* The bullet had 
punctured my lungs and they were 
filled with a watery substance. I hac^ 
a fever of 105 and Dr. Kane says 
that I had quite a bad case of pneu- 
monia. However I'm getting well 
rapidly tho I still have the one bul- 
let in my left side. 

As soon as I get strong enough to 
stand I'm to have an X-ray taken of 
my chest and then Dr. Kane will op- 
erate and remove the bullet. Just 
at present they are talking of evacu- 
ating. They have made up a list and 
I am listed as "Class D" which means 
it will take four months for my com- 
plete recovery and return to duty 
and, theoretically at least, I am to be 
evacuated to the States, so I may 
see you soon after New Years — but I 
doubt it very much altho I certainly 
would enjoy seeing all of you again. 

I wish I might have been with the 
Division when the armistice went in- 
to effect for our division has done as 
much as any division over here to- 
wards bringing about peace. We 
have been twice cited by Pershing 
in general orders, but I don't suppose 
I'll get back to the outfit again. 



Lt. Kauffman Tells 
of Life in Germany 

Lt. Harlan B. Kauffman writes 
from Germany. 

If change is the essence of happi- 
ness over here, and it is for some of 
us, we are shifting environments of- 
ten enough to keep pretty much alive. 
From No Man's Land in the Argonne, 
through liberated France, across the 
beautiful little duchy of Luxembourg 
with its wonderfully hospitable, 
warm-hearted people, and finally in- 
to Germany and up along the Mo- 
selle through Treves, it has been a 
varied and colorful march. I think 
I wrote you from Petange, down in 



the corner of Luxembourg, where we 
rested a week in billets. We crossed 
Luxembourg in three days, stopping in 
billets each night at Bertrange, Nied- 
eranven, and Wasserbilling, on the 
border. The fourth morning I went 
on a side car before daylight to find 
our first home in Germany, Pfalzel, 
a town of about 3,000 on the Moselle 
four miles above Treves (or Trier in 
German). That was the 4th, and we 
will rest here, probably till the 9th, 
and then pick it up again for another 
hitch. The army moves by hitches 
of from six to seven days, and then 
rests, to give the supply service a 
chance to catch up and re-establish. 
Two more hitches will see us at the 
river, 115 kilometers from here, I 
think. Our line of march follows the 
Moselle, so again we are in luck, for 
that is by far the most interesting 
route. All has gone very well, and 
we have lost only a few men. 

Most of the men seem to 
like Germany pretty well, what lit- 
tle they have seen of it. Our com- 
panies average about twenty Ger- 
mans, so on the whole they are much 
more at home here than they were 
in France. Myself I don't care for 
the country, at least so far. I loved 
France, and the French, and if you 
like France I don't think Germany 
appeals to you. Being temporarily 
on transportation I have been pretty 
much over this section of the country 
the last few days, and everywhere 
the Yanks and the German people 
are hitting it off in great shape. 
Except for a few street fights in 
Treves I haven't heard of any trouble 
where Americans are. The French 
of course are having some, or making 
some. Naturally they hate the 
Boche, they can't forget the treat- 
ment their own people have received 
in Northern France, and they are 
not over particular about wearing 
gloves up here. Nobody can blame 
them. But the Americans have been 
orderly and well-behaved, the army 
is well in hand and paying for every- 
thing it takes or uses, and the people 
are fast coming to think us the best 
ever. They say they had no idea 
what to expect, but judging from 
their own army were afraid they 
would be bullied and mistreated and 
robbed some more. They really can't 
dope the Yanks out, but they're 
"for" them, — -that's about the size 
of it. They do the most outrageous, 
the most unheard of things, these 
Yanks. The officers have been seen 
fraternizing with the men, actually 
sitting at the same table, on occasions, 
drinking or eating with them. It 
seems incredible, yet these same offl- 



82 



THE STENTOR 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



use_BO WM AN'S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milK bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 

BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland" Park 9 101-1C9 Vine Ave 



cers and men licked their best Prus- 
sian Guards a time or two, so it 
must be all right. And once in a 
while an officer turns in and lends 
a hand somewhere, cranks a car or 
helps one of his men with his pack — - 
it's quite incomprehensible, but some- 
how it works, and after all that's the 
core of it. And so they watch us, 
in varying stages of astonishment, but 
they give us credit. By their stand- 
ards we ought not to be any good 
as an army, but we've quite recently 
proved it, and they're not yet forget- 
ting. Yesterday I was up northwest 
about 30 miles at Kyllburg, where 
3rd Corps Hq. are temporarily, and 
there the people seemed to have taken 
the troops in as warmly as the French 
ever did. They are so relieved to find 
us decent and courteous, and so deep- 
ly glad that the war is over, and the 
reaction brings back the nearly for- 
gotten smiles. In Kyllburg I talked 
(in English) with a German captain 
— ex-captain, returned home a week 
ago — and he said they are all firmly 
convinced they would have won the 
war ultimately but for the Ameri- 
cans. He said they had no idea that 
there were a third as many Ameri- 



cans here as there now are; they 
can't make out where they all come 
from. From his point of view I 
gathered that the Germans grant 
us a whole lot, more than we de 
serve I guess, but it isn't necessary 
to argue that with them. (My pro- 
nouns seem to be mixing around, 
but you get what I mean). This 
captain was a very decent sort, and 
in addition to being frank and fair- 
ly broad he touched his hat when he 
came and when he left. It's a queer 
thing, this late war mania, this na- 
tional antipathy, or hate as it is with 
the French. It puzzles you constant- 
ly up here. You don't see any visible 
sign or demonstration of the thing 
you've supposed you were fighting 
against. It's a cinch that these peo- 
ple, the people with whom we're liv- 
ing and more or less associating in 
these towns, did not share in any 
dream of world empire. All they want- 
ed was to have the war end so they 
could settle down and get something 
to eat again. They were as sick of war 
as a people could possibly be. For I 
don't know how long past they had 
lived on cabbage and potatoes and 
black bread. The first American ra- 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



FRANK BULOW 

Barber 

Under Jensen's Shoe Store 
RAILROAD TICKETS 



Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 1 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 



C. T. Gunn Co. 

Grocers 

Agency Huyler's Candis 

Curtice Bros. Goads LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



KUBELSKY &?% 



arry Levin 



Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxia at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



83 



Established 1S71 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 
73-75 W. South Water Street 

Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



Dr. C. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



£JLASS Pins and Rings. 
^^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 
SPEISBROS 



iiniiiniiiiiiiiiii 



27 E. MONROE 9T. 

CHICAGO 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 



iiiii 

/^1 For Light 

t T fll C For Heat 
\JVi/*3 F or Power 

North Shore Gas Co. 

■ill 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusive 
Dry Goods Store 

3 




yrshop/or 

^Womens&Childrens Furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



tions for the people were just being 
distributed in Kyllburg, and you 
should have seen the light in their 
eyes. You could almost buy a man's 
soul, if you chose to, with a loaf of 
our good white bread, and beef they 
haven't tasted in several years. 
Horse-flesh gave out long ago. (We 
have been getting white bread our 
selves only the last few weeks). They 
have forgotten there ever was such a 
thing as soap. You can trade a pound 
of coffee for a bottle of the best 
schnapps in the country. Whenever 
we go off on a trip in connection with 
our transportation we always make 
sure we have a few rations along for 
exchange and leave our money at 
home. 

As I write this in Co. "I" orderly 
room, in the kitchen of a German 
house, four young ones of from three 
to eight are hanging over the type- 
writer, as interested as they can be, 
trying to figure out just what sort of 
a thing the machine is. None of 
them ever saw one before. The moth- 
er never saw one either, but she does 
n't let on. I have never seen so many 
children in all my life. They are 
everywhere, flocks of them. On the 
roads there will be a group of a dozen 
every hundred yards or so; apparent- 
ly they live on the roads, for you see 
them at all hours, begging for bread 
or tobacco, and getting in your way 
continually, — I mean in the way of 
the trucks. Most of them very young, 
war children. God only knows how 
they will ever straighten out parent- 
age in this country; family trees will 
all look like crab apples. 

The man that owns this house came 
in a little while ago, and is taking 
his turn at watching the typewriter. 
I gave him a little good American 
tobacco for his pipe, and he says it's 
the first good smoke he's had in three 
years. A month ago I might possibly 
have been sticking a good American 
bayonet into his throat, if I'd been 
lucky enough to get there first, but 
now I sit in his kitchen and the ser- 
geant asks him questions for me. We 
did get one good one from him. 
Every morning since we've been here 
there has been some sort of a church 
service, and nearly everybody, appar- 
ently, goes. We asked him what for. 
"To pray", he said. "God and the 
Kaiser have been together for a long 
time, but now they're separated, and 
every morning we pray to God not to 
go near the Kaiser again". Now 
what do you think of that? I swear 
this late war is clearing up a bit, for 
me. 



Chambers "Q& 
Studio 



209 S. State St., Chicago 
Republic Bldg. 



■Ill 



# The 

Sheridan Cafe 

MARIAN H. CRAIG 

Two Good Places to Eat 
HOME and HERE 

10 N. Sheridan Road 
HIGHLAND PARK :: ILL 

luiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiioiiini 



Thel^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsfay 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision 'Dealers 



Grocery 



Market 



807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 

Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



$74 ®® takes beautiful new 

^ * $250.00 mahogany finish 

phonograph and records. Never used. 
60 inches high. Latest design. Will ship 
C. O. D. on approval. 

Mrs. Waverly Brown 

317 Greenleaf Ave., Wilmette. Illinois 



84 



THE STENTOR 



IIIIIlllllllllllllli™ 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C., the college work for the rest of the 
year will be reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — will be 
continued for this year; consequently the second term will open on Tuesday, Jan. 7. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. :( ^ 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, 111. 



m 



■1111 



■■III 



inns 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 
Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 

C. G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 
Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing ■ Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning and Pressing . . $1.50 

Pressing ... . . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



The 

— J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 



Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



j. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, HI. 



M. H. Hussey & Go. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 




The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, January 31, 1919. 



NUMBER 12. 



Big Game Tonight! 

Another on Monday 



On Friday night there is going to 
be one of the biggest Basket Ball 
games you ever saw. If you have a 
spark of pep or spirit in you You'll 
Be There. We've got to beat Mon- 
mouth. We're going to beat 'em, but 
in order to do it the team must know 
that every man and woman on this 
campus is behind them and behind 
them strong. Come out and let them 
know that we're full of the good old 
Lake Forest spirit — 

And before your exhilaration over 
our victory that the boys are going to 
win for us Friday night has died out, 
we're going to win another one! 



Knox, our old time enemies, are going 
to play with us Monday night — the 
game is going to be a hard one and 
our fellows will have to fight and fight 
hard — but they'll do it and they'll 
win. Lets show them that we appre- 
ciate what they're doing for Lake 
Forest. 

Come on out, everybody, let's see 
every one of you at both games and 
let's back the fellows to the limit. 

Don't forget — ■ 

Friday night — the 31st, we play 
Monmouth — Monday night we play 
Knox! 



League of Nations 

Endorsed at Family 
Dinner 



The first family dinner of this year 
was given Tuesday evening at the 
Commons. Beside the Student body 
and faculty there were a number of 
town guests present. A most deli- 
cious dinner was served, but the feat- 
ure of the evening was an address 
by Mr. Salmon Levinson on "The 
League of Nations." The principal 
points made by the speaker were the 
dangers of a closed peace conference; 
the ineffectiveness of international 
law as a means of regulating war, 
due to the fact that it recognizes war 
as a legal way of settling disputes. 
Mr. Levinson emphasized the fact that 
the Hague Conventions failed because 
there was no power to enforce them. 
Duelling ceased when public opinion 
looked upon it as illegal murder. 
War must be banished in the same 
way. The Cecil and Smuts plans for 
a League would result in a mere al- 
liance. A real "League of Nations" 
must end war, not for a year, but for 
all time. 

To give proof of our loyalty to this 
ideal a resolution was presented and 



Garrick Club Pledges 
New Members 



On Tuesday night at Lois Durand 
Hall the Garrick Club held its first 
real meeting of the year. Plans for 
the rest of the year were discussed 
which should bring about some good 
results. Under Mr. Troutman's lead- 
ership three or four more plays will 
be given. He plans on giving some 
plays which are very well known and 
can not help but cause a great inter- 
est in the work. In these plays there 
will be new people appearing and 
from these the Garrick Club expects 
to choose its members. The Club 
elected officers and those chosen were: 

President Anne Merner 

Secretary Eleanor Goble 

Treasurer Gwendolyn Massey 

Business Manager. Paul Oppenheiser 

Those chosen from the cast of 
"Jack Straw" as pledged were: 
Elsie Engel C. Edwin Johnson 

Lorraine Maclay Myron Thayer 



unanimously adopted urging an open 
conference which will formulate a 
League of Nations with power to pre- 
serve universal peace. 



Junior Prom, Best 
in Years 

The nineteenth Annual Junior 
Promenade which occurred last Sat- 
urday night, at the Art Institute, sur- 
passed that of any year previous and 
was noted by the entire college to be 
the best and cleverest dance ever put 
on by any class in the history of Lake 
Forest College. 

The rotunda was beautifully deco- 
rated in red and white. Streamers of 
these colors were festooned from the 
balcony to a beautiful arch on the 
landing. The Reception Committee, 
consisting of Dr. and Mrs. Wright, 
Mr. and Mrs. Van Steenderen, Miss 
Hamilton, Miss Tremaine, Mr. Sibley, 
Vernon Downs and Irene Farwell, was 
formed at the foot of the stairs. 
Mason Armstrong and Eloise Brown 
led the Grand March and from then 
until eleven thirty there was not a 
dull moment for anyone. 

In the Big Room, the color scheme 
of red and white was carried out. A 
false ceiling of twisted crepe paper, 
together with the large draped light 
in the center of the room so trans- 
formed it that few would have recog- 
nized the place. The stage repre- 
sented a woodland scene, and the 
palms added greatly to the general 
effect. The small shaded lights en- 
hanced the beauty of the rooms and 
the many cozy corners with soft pil- 
lows were popular retreats during the 
short intermissions. 

The punch was delightful and re- 
flected great credit upon the taste of 
the Junior class. It is useless to try 
to describe the music. Let It suffice 
to say that there is a warm spot in 
the hearts of us all for any persons 
who can provide such an orchestra. 
It was the best that Lake Forest has 
heard for many a day. 

Everyone is praising the Prom com- 
mittee, Josephine Martin, Ann Mer- 
ner, Glen Herrcke, Lucius Legner, 
and especially Mason Armstrong, for 
their untiring efforts to make this 
dance the great success that it was. 

"Fritz" Chamberlin spent the week 
end with Omega Psi. 



86 



THE STENTOR 



Music School Brings 

Famous Organist 

to Lake Forest 

The approaching organ recital by 
Joseph Bonnet is being keenly anti- 
cipated in Lake Forest and the ad- 
joining towns of the North Shore. 
No one with a liking for music can 
afford to miss it. The management 
has brought this concert within the 
reach of all by opening two sections 
of unreserved seats at seventy-five 
and fifty cents. Tickets may be pro- 
cured in the North Hall office or at 
the door. M. Bonnet is sent to Amer- 
ica by the French government, and 
will devote a portion of the proceeds 
of this game to war relief in France. 
On this account the Session has al- 
lowed the doors of the Presbyterian 
church to be opened for a public con- 
cert. 

M. Bonnet took his first position 
as organist at the age of fourteen. 
Later he studied under Guilmant at 
the Paris Conservatoire where he was 
awarded a "premier prix," competing 
with several organists, all first prize 
men of the Conservatoire. He won 
the position of organist at the church 
of St. Eustache in Paris. Upon the 
death of Guilmant he was appointed 
organist of the concerts of the Con- 
servatoire. 

In 1910-1911 M. Bonnet gave forty 
recitals at St. Eustache, playing no 
single number more than once during 
the whole season. Contrary to the 
practice of most organists he plays 
without notes. For his Lake Forest 
appearance he has chosen an exquis- 
ite program ranging from works by 
forerunners of Bach to brilliant com- 
positions of his own in which he dis- 
plays geat skill of hand and foot. A 
large audience from the college cam- 
pus should hear the man who, more 
than any other, is making organ con- 
certs popular in America. 



When the millennium comes 

We'll have an uninterrupted danc- 
ing class. 

There'll be a basket ball team. 

We'll have dates on Sunday nights. 

We'll have a real Student's parlor 
with furniture. 



At last! Exam, week is here. We 
must stop right away and go to cram- 
ming. 



E. Van Sickle answered roll- call 
at Digamma over the week end. 



Jen and Mary 

We ain't making no apologies — 
that ain't our style of beatification, 
but did you read our last weakly edi- 
tion? It is a joke unto itself, as 
they say it in North Chicago. Any- 
how we noticed that '"Jack Straw" 
was a hugh success. Also "Sat" 
loomed up in the headlights of the 
first page, and we saw "many new 
men are back." The proof-reader 
says she doesn't have no, idea at all 
about why there were so many typo- 
graphical errors. "Gosh no, kid" — 
she was drunk and her morphine had 
run out, but that was neither here 
nor — anywhere else — "suthin musta 
benthu matta." 



May we include a brief summary 
of a thrilling drammer that we wit- 
nessed last week entitled 

Prom Strategy, or 
How Do They Get That Way? 

Prologue — Thurs. P. M. before 
Prom. 

Our hero is seen in the distance 
sauntering jauntily along a cinder 
walk. He is a handsome youth, eas- 
ily recognized half a mile away by 
the brilliant blue of his cits. Ap- 
proaching the center of the stage he 
is seen to be reading a letter. 

He — wildly tearing his hair — Ah! 
called to Chicago! Bosh! Oh! the 
wretch — the miserable wretch! En- 
ter a tall willowy coed from the left 
wing. 

He — drawing himself up to his full 
height and gazing up at her. Ah! 
good morning — I have just received 
your note — I am — oh — indeed sorry 
that — uh, uh. 

She — Yes, I am very sorry. Good 
afternoon. 

Curtain 

Act I — Scene, a class room — bench- 
es full of inattentive students — a 
teacher on a platform at the left — 
blackboards, etc. 

Scene I — 8:00 A. M. Friday. 
Our hero — producing a scented note 
from his hip pocket — leaning far in- 
to the aisle — Miss Brown will you 
please hand this to Miss Smith? Miss 
Brown — with a searching glance — 
does so, dexterously slipping said 
epistle to a dusky haired damsel. 
Miss Smith shaking head whispers a 
moment with our hero. 
Bell rings — exit all — our hero linger- 
ing dejectedly behind. 

Scene II — S:50 A. M. 
Same scene as Scene I. 
Our hero saunters in with bis usual 
carelessly graceful air — sees Miss 



Jones loitering in the rear — -ap- 
proaches her smiling secretly like a 
Cheshire cat. 

He — Miss Jones, I have been looking 
for you everywhere. I just decided 
to go to Prom. Would you go with 
me?" 

Miss Jones — I am so sorry but I — 
I — I — don't really care much for for- 
mals — and — a — a — I have made other 
arrangements for the evening. 
Teacher arrives — they take seats. 
Curtain 
Act II — Friday P. M. Telephone 
booth — our hero inside. 
He — Miss Snoops — I have just decid- 
ed to go to Prom— would you con- 
sider accompanying me? 
Oh, that is too bad. Is Miss Brown 
there? 

Miss Brown— I have just decided to 
go to Prom — how about a date? 
Oh! that is too bad — Do you know of 
anyone else — oh — ah — good-bye. 

Act III — Art Institute — Saturday, 
P. M. 

Through the open doors of the ball 
room our hero is seen swaggering 
gracefully under the arm of a charm- 
ing unknown maiden. 
Curtain 



"Some are born to greatness, some 
achieve greatness — and some have it 
thrust upon them" — for instance, our 
last week's stirring editorial. Where 
is the lucky female who has not had 
it forcibly added to her list of 
achievements? 



Mrs. R. F. Clarke of Independence, 
la., is the guest of her daughter, 
Josephine. 



The Misses Crotzer, Miller and Rob- 
inson, spent the week end with Edith 

Wise. 



Sara Fisher, Flora Shattuck and- 
Helen Hoyer were entertained by 
Mary Burnette at her home in Wauk- 
egan last week end. 



Sigma Tau announces the initi- 
ation of Josephine Clarke, Thursday 
evening. 



Forence Metzger spent the week 
end in Chicago with friends. 



Mary Clayton of Northwestern was 
the guest of Sara Moore over the 
week end, attending prom, on Satur- 
day night. 



THE STENTOR 



87 



Lake Forest Players 
to Appear Soon 

On Wednesday evening, February 
11, at the Durand Art Institute The 
Lake Forest Players consisting of 
Miss Frances Kemp '12, Raymond 
Moore '20, and Charles C. Mather '14, 
make their initial bow in three one 
act plays given under the auspices of 
the Lake Forest Woman's Club. The 
plays which are of three entirely dif- 
ferent types are: The Lower Road, 
Two on a 'Bus, and The Verdict. 

The casts follow: 

The Lower Road 

By Chas. C. Mather 

Mrs. Dawson Frances Kemp 

Frank Dawson, her husband 

Chas. C. Mather 
Harry Dawson, their son 

Raymond Moore 

Two on a 'Bus 

By Herbert Surars 



Kitty Tivyford 
Sam Tivyford 



Frances Kemp 
Chas. C. Mather 



The Verdict 

By Chas. C. Mather 

The Stranger Chas. C. Mather 

Jim O'Neil, alias Eddie Flynn 

Raymond Moore 
Peggy Frances Kemp 



Farmers'Convention 
at Libertyville 

Last Thursday afternoon was the 
occasion of the annual Farmers' Con- 
vention at Libertyville. Dr. Wright 
presided and spoke of the need of a 
university training and the fact that 
Lake Forest should naturally draw 
students from the farming districts in 
Lake County. 

The chief feature of the affair was, 
however, the work of the College 
Quartette consisting chiefly of Mil 
Zenos assisted by Peg Horton, Ray- 
mond Moore, and J. M. MeEvoy 
They rendered several light selec- 
tions, notably "Ja Da," which got by 
chiefly because of the unintelligibil- 
ity of the words and Mil's Elgin 
Movement. One of the farmers in 
the front row after nearly breaking 
down the floor with his hickory, aud- 
ibly remarked, "Who eares for Theda 

Baxa now? This is the life to 

with my wife!" 



L. F. Loses to Beloit 

One Point Decides Game-Score 24-23 



After having the game apparently 
sewed up and everybody had started 
to be bored at the onesidedness of the 
score, our basket ball team dropped 
into a coma and permitted Beloit to 
beat us by the scant margin of one 
point. In the first half Beloit was 
unable to score a single field basket, 
owing chiefly to the excellent work 
done by Captain Rees and Maplesden 
in the guard positions. McCormack 
and Sumner shot baskets well and 
Eddy was also good in spite of an in- 
jury to his ankle incurred in the 
second play. In the second half, the 
good work was kept up until the 
score was twenty-three to six in our 
favor. Then several things happen- 
ed. First, Maplesden hurt his foot 
and, after gamely sticking it out for 
about three minutes was replaced by 
Huffman. Then Sumner developed an 
attack of sleeping sickness and per- 
mitted his man to shoot six baskets 
in rapid succession. This last, how- 
ever, was hot entirely Sumner's fault, 
as the whole team gave in to lack of 
physical condition which was the big 
factor in losing the game which was 
apparently on ice. Right here, how- 
ever, credit must be given to Beloit 
for staging an extremely game rally 
through which they deserved to win. 
Witte, their right guard, gave a 
sparkling exhibition of basket shoot- 
ing and their team work in the clos- 



ing moments of play was excellent. 
The last shot, made by Beimer from 
past the middle of the floor might be 
classed as lucky, but no team that 
goes to pieces as our team did de- 
serves to win. The work of our team 
as a whole showed that with some 
hard work to overcome the deplorable 
]ack of physical condition, that there 
is no reason why we should not win 
the conference championship in spite 
of such an unfortunate start. Are we 
downhearted? No! Let's all get out 
and pull against Monmouth and Knox 
who are next on the schedule. 
The lineup — 



BELOIT (24) 




Beimer 


R.F 


Coe, Garrity 


L.F 


Van Epps 


C 


Witte 


R.G 


Lansing 


L.G 



LAKE FOREST (23) 
Eddy R.F. 

Sumner L.F. 

Mc Cormack C. 

Rees R.G. 

Maplesden, Huffman L.G. 

Baskets' — Beimer, Garrity 2, Lansing, 

Van Epps 6. 

Eddy 2, Sumner 5, Mc Cormack 3, 

Rees. 
Free Throws^Lansing 4, Eddy. 
Referee — D. J. Heny, Kenyon. 



Philosophy Club Meets 

Dr. and Mrs. Wright entertained 
the old and new members of the 
Philosophy Club last Wednesday 
evening at their home. A very de- 
licious dinner was served. After 
which there was much talking and 
singing. The philosophy club is 
starting out well with thirteen mem- 
bers altogether. Many interesting 
discussions are promised for "Us in 
the future. 



Digamma announces the pledging 
of Horace Horton and Kenneth Mayo. 



Jean Floberg of Rockford visited 
Phi Pi with Pete Erb over the week 
end and attended the Junior Prom. 



Elsie Engel visited in Chicago over 
the week end, 



Another Musical Chapel 

It may be the effect of having a 
music school on the campus. At any 
rate we are enjoying a series of mus- 
ical chapel services. Professor Van 
Steenderen was the second soloist to 
make his debut in chapel last week. 
On Thursday morning he presented a 
short but most agreeable program to 
an appreciative audience. We have 
now discovered an organist and a 
violinist in our midst and are hoping 
some more concealed talent may soon 
be revealed. 



Sigma Tau entertained Alice Doug- 
las, Dorothy Dobin, Delia Babcock, 
Virginia Phillips, Madeline Hoover 
and Sara Jane Ross over the week 
end. 



THE STENTOR 



79 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 
Board of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '19. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Ralph Stewart, '20. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers : 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Otis Chatfield-Taylor, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

James Crawford, '22. 

Howard Wood, ^2. 

Prof. W. R. Bridgeman. 

Faculty and Alumni. 
Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 






WE have heard a number of 
times that our service flag 
was to be completed. That 
is, more blue stars and a number of 
gold stars were to be added. This 
has been some time ago but the same 
service flag, containing the same 
number of stars it did a year since, 
still hangs in chapel. The men are 
coming back from the service and we 
surely do not want them to find that 
they have not been represented on our 
service flag. Nor do we care to have 
strangers think our flag represents all 
the men we have in service. It is 
far from doing that. 

Can't the Student Council concern 
itself in this matter? If all the neces- 
sary data have not been collected 
there is surely enough on hand to be- 
gin with. And while the Student Coun- 
cil is interested in the subject of 
flags, could it not also see that a flag 
is kept flying from the flag staff? The 
other day Captain Rumsey, who pre- 
sented Lake Forest College with its 
flag staff, was a visitor in chapel, and 
it was a bit embarrassing to all of us 
to notice that the staff was empty on 
that particular morning. In these 
days of reconstruction it is just as 
necessary to remember what we have 
fought for as it was during the war 
and one way of helping us remember 
is to have our flag displayed every 
day. 



NEW sport has been devised 
at dear old Lake Forest Col- 
lege. For the particularly ath- 
letic it is entirely suited, as it re- 
quires agility and a quick eye. For 
the spectators it also has advantages, 
for after seeing some of the Lois Hall- 
ers playing it, it is no longer neces- 
sary to pay F. Ziegfleld three dollars 
and thirty cents for a peek at the 
lower extremities of pulchritudinous 
members of the more deadly of the 
species. The sport to which we refer 
is making one's way by means of 
leaps, bounds, and the Australian 
crawl through the mudhole in the 
path between College Hall and the 
Institute. There is a well known 
psychological law, however, to the ef- 
fect that too much is plenty, and we 
believe that everyone is now tired of 
splashing through the morass by the 
power house on the way to the In- 
stitute. We have been racking our 
brain for an answer to the problem of 
why such a condition is permitted to 
exist on a path that everybody in col 
lege uses every day, and we have fin- 
ally reached the conclusion that it is 
either sheer laziness on the part of 
Mr. Huhnke and his staff or else he 
is getting a rake-off from the Shinola 
Shoe Polish Company. In either case, 
it should not be tolerated when a few 
planks advantageously placed, or at 
Jsast some more cinders would remedy 
this very annoying condition. 



Dr. Blake Reforms 
Lois Hall 

As a result of the health talks by 
Dr. Eva Blake of Philadelphia, great 
and startling things are taking place 
in Lois Hall. Instead of languidly 
spent afternoons in the dormitory, 
there are long and invigorating daily 
walks to Fort Sheridan or some equal- 
ly distant point. As a further result, 
there are 48 healthy appetites which 
almost make it unnecessary to re- 
member the doctor's admonition to 
eat everything without comment or 
grumbling. Then, too, we follow the 
advice of the late Dr. Fletcher and 
chew, chew, chew, every morsel of 
food we eat. This is not all — every 
morning before the rising bell has 
sounded, the Lois Haller awakens, 
yawns and arises — all according to 
Hoyle, and then conscientiously 
breathes five times before an open 
window, pulls lustily the imaginary 
church bell, aeroplanes around the 
room, swims without water and con- 
cludes with any other exercise she 
may remember or invent. 

These performances, at any rate, 
have been taking place for the last 
two days, and there is no doubt they 
will become a part of the tenacious 
traditions of Lois Hall. 



Heard in a class of Prof Ray- 
mond's. 

Prof R. : "Did I not tell you to be 
prepared with your history lesson, 
and here you are unable to repeat a 
word of it." 

Pupil: "I didn't think it necessary, 
Sir, I've always heard that history 
repeats itself." 



"Pete" Erb, Herbert Peterson and 
Kenneth Berst spent the week end re- 
newing acquaintances at Phi Pi Ep- 
silon. 



Harold Eichoff spent Saturday with 
his parents in Chicago. 



Bob Framberg for a change visits 
his parents in Chicago on Sunday. 



William 



Late afternoon in June, with golden 
skein 
Of sunlight dropping from the 

clear, cool sky — 
Then was the hour he came to say 
good-bye. 
We found it hard to talk. At last, 

to feign 
Colossal unconcern, "It looks like 
rain" 
He said, and awkward turned 

away. And I, 
Amused and mildly mocking, made 
reply 



"Not indoors, William." 'Twas a 

challenge vain; 
He was already gone. — Poor little 

jest, 
How after years it haunts me! Long 

ago 
He went with June; but now that 

Winter roars 
And the rain freezes where he lies at 

rest, 
In thought I say, and wish that he 

might know, 
"Yes, William, now it looks like rain 

indoors." 



THE STENTOR 



89 



A Trip to the Stock 
Yards 

Last Tuesday the Home Economics 
class and several of the other girls 
in the hall, under the direction of 
Miss Hospes, formed a party to go 
thru the stock yards. After a very 
complicated trip the party finally 
reached the Swift and Co. buildings 
where they were entertained for din- 
ner. It was a very elaborate and 
greatly appreciated dinner and every 
one proclaimed that that in itself 
made the trip well worth while. Af- 
ter that a guide came who conducted 
the party through the different build- 
ings. The office building was splen- 
didly equipped with rest rooms, cafe- 
teria and restaurant. 

Going out into the slaughtering 
houses, the party first saw the pro- 
cess of converting hogs into pork for 
the table. The process was very in- 
teresting although there were some 
who did not care to witness the kill- 
ing stage for various reasons, one of 
them being the very noticeable odor 
which seemed to pervade this build- 
ing. Next they saw the pork cut and 
sent down a chute to the workroom 
below. In another part of the build- 
ing the smoking and curing process 
was going on. In a similar way, in 
different buildings sheep and cattle 
were being converted into lamb chops 
and porterhouse steaks. In still an- 
other department oleomargerine and 
butterine were being made and this, 
too, was very interesting. 

After seeing the sights at Swift and 
Company the party went through the 
Libby McNeil and Libby buildings. 
Going first into the visitor's room they 
enjoyed moving pictures of the pro- 
cesses which were to be seen as they 
went through the buildings. In one 
place weiners were being packed, in 
another place corned beef hash was 
being hashed, and in various other 
departments dried beef was being 
packed, beef extract put up and other 
similar products canned and put up 
for consumption. 

It was on extremely interesting 
and entertaining day and every one 
who went felt more than repaid. 



"Doc" O'Leary dropped in on Dig- 
amma for a short visit over the week 
end. 



Pass in Review 

As we write this, Lucius Lobdell, 
evidencing a marked preference but 
no consideration for the Phi Pi piano, 
reminds us that he is thinking of 
running in competition .to the Sultan 
of Turkey as far as polygamy is con- 
cerned. At the Beloit game he had 
ten Perries on each side, but was eas- 
ily scared out. He did blush prettily, 
at that, when he beat a precipitate 
retreat to the masculine section. 



In Psychology Bechtel on being 
asked the proper proportion of work 
and rest, replied, "Two hours of work 
and fifteen of rest are best." 



According to Hobbes, a noted phil- 
osopher, everything in thought is re- 
duced to motion and philosophy is 
the science of the motion of body. 
After seeing the Follies we were 
tempted to ask Dr. Wright just why 
Marilynn Miller was not the greatest 
philosopher of the age. 



It is rumored that "Tommy" Tuck- 
er spent Saturday night visiting sev- 
eral friends in Chicago. 



Did the girl indicate the door be- 
hind which was the tiger or that con- 
cealing the beautiful lady? If she 
was a fierce and bitter barbarian with 
unrestrainable passions and thoughts 
like the queen of Lois Hall who wrote 
the scathing article on the Prom in 
last week's Stentor, we are betting on 
the tiger. Gosh, that was a mean 
write-up! 



At that, we were not impressed by 
the conspicuous absence of more than 
thirty Lois Hallers worth spending 
three dollars and a half on. 



Alumni Notes 

1895. John G. Coulter, who has 
been occupied for some time past in 
France in agricultural reconstruction, 
has now been connected with the 
American Peace Commission in Paris. 
1901. An article in the St. Louis 
Republic of January 24th states that 
Guy Caron of Little Rock, Arkansas, 
has made a contract with the city of 
St. Louis to dispose of the city gar- 
bage from Feb. 14, 1919 to March 1, 
1920. He is to pay the city 35 cents 
a ton for all garbage delivered to 
him at a hog-raising farm he is to 
establish within 40 miles of St. Louis 
and to accept all deliveries. 
This supercedes a contract by which 
the city has delivered the garbage to 
a company across the river in Illinois 
gratis. 

1907. The home address of Lieut. 
W. Torbet is changed to Redwood 
Falls, Minn., where his father has 
recently gone as a Presbyterian pas- 
tor. 

1911. Stuart D. and Mrs. (Ruby 
Hall) Marquis, not to omit the junior 
member of the family, have returned 
to Chicago, and Mr. Marquis has tak- 
en a position with the Erwine-Wasey 
Advertising Co., 1622, 5S E. Wash- 
ington St. The family plan at last 
accounts was to reside in Evanston. 
1913. Lora E. Perrin after leaving 
college at the end of her Junior year 
taught three years in the Escanaba, 
Mich., schools and then went to Chi- 
cago University, taking the B. A. de- 
gree in 1916. After one more year 
of teaching she was married to Mr. 
John Riley, a pharmacist of Escan- 
aba. She now has a daughter about 
two months old. 



1918. Leon McFerran has taken a 
And as for the imports, ask Ned, position in the produce department 



he knows. 



Which impels the question- — Was 
what Ned did that night his import 
duty? 



"Bob": Yah! I was a 1st Lieuten- 
ant in the Red Cross at Camp Grant 
thus summer. 



of Swift & Co. 

1919. Donald C. Woods is at Pel- 
ham Bay Park, N. Y., in the N. A. R. 
School, Division 15, expecting to get 
his commission or freedom from fur- 
ther service before February 1. 

Rev. Simon J. McPherson, D. D., 
headmaster at Lawrenceville School 
since 1895, who died Dec. 28, was 
from 1883 to 1895 a valued Trustee 
of the College. 



90 



THE STENT OR 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



USE BOWMAN'S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milK bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 J01-1C9 Vine Ave 



Addie Schwittay,'14, 
Tells of Her Work 

We take pleasure in printing rather 
full extracts from a private letter 
from Miss Addie Schwittay, '14, who 
attended the Nurses' Training Sshool 
at Vassar last summer and went on 
from there to Bellevue Hospital in 
New York. 

"Three months of my training are 
over, and when I have time I try to 
analyze my feelings about it. Some- 
times I like it thoroughly — some- 
times I positively hate it. I like it 
because I believe there is real need 
for it, even with the war over. The 
epidemic bas more or less spent its 
fury here in New York, but I had a 
letter yesterday from a sister in Mon- 
tana who with no nursing experience 
or training, whatever, has been in 
charge nights for six weeks of an 
emergency hospital, the school house, 
in her town. We have had strenuous 
times here. All the gruesome inci- 
dents of the plague were seen, I sup- 



pose, more or less in Bellevue. It 
is the city general hospital, charitable 
for the most part. You begin to 
understand what a melting pot the 
U. S. and New York City especially 
are, after a week's work here. In 
my ward now I have an Englishman, 
Italian, Jew, a Chinaman, a Mexican, 
some Irish, some Germans, and one 
black man. And this is just typical 
of the hospital. No one, of what- 
ever creed or race or color he may be 
is ever turned away from Bellevue 
Hospital. Suspected murderers and 
burglars even are brought here for 
treatment, and as far as care goes, 
their lot is as good as their honest 
neighbors. A nurse never asks about 
morals or past history for the patient 
to her is just a sick man. Sometimes 
you wonder whether it is socially 
economic to try to cure such repro- 
bates and turn them out in society 
again. But still, I sort of admire 
the professional attitude of the nurses 
and doctors in the matter. 

"I don't like nursing because it is 
so unscientific — a nurse simply obeys 
orders without questioning the why 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 



FRANK BULOW 

Barber 

Under Jensen's Shoe Store 

RAILROAD TICKETS 



Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop 
Phone 1 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



C. T. Gunn Co. 

Grocers 

Agency Huyler's Candi s 

Curtice Bros. Goods LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



171 T T> TJ T C1Z" V Successor to 

JVUJ&liJLaKl Harry Levi. 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No, Job To© Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST. ILL 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxia at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



91 



Established Wl 


Geo. Middendorf 


Co. 


Wholesale Produce 


73-75 W. South Water Street 


Telephone Randolph 1880 


CHICAGO 



Dr. C. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a ra. to 1:00 p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 

lil!lllllllll!l|[||||||||||||lllllllil[!!!ll!l!l!lll!llllllllllllli 

{"^LASS Pins and Rings. 
^■^ Fraternity and Sorority 
Jewelr3 7 . Programs. 

SPEIS BROS. £ H i°cTgo 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 

^11!' ■■.',,.. i" 

/^V For Light 

§ T /J C For Heat 
V^l/fO f or p ower 

North Shore Gas Co. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusive 
Dry Goods Store 




Dry Goods 



_yfShopfor 
'Womens&Childrens Furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

EXPRESSMAN | 

Special Attention Given to Students 8| 



TELEPHONE 

NUMBERS 



Residence 675 
Office 384 



or wherefore. She needs to be just 
a rather well trained automaton, 
that functions just as well whether 
she knows what ails her patient or 
not. I don't mean that entirely. 
Human kindness and sympathy mean 
much to sick people, and I am sorry 
to say that not all women who take 
up nurse's training are possessed of 
much. Of all professions, nursing 
demands these qualities most, it 
seems to me. I think you ought to 
know the case scientifically more than 
you can ever know it with just a 
nurse's training. 

"Our hours, are from 7 to 7 with 
two hours off duty. We are so tired 
that we never read, except the head 
lines in the newspaper or the casu- 
ality list. There has been a good 
deal of agitation for shorter hours 
and the Vassar girls have expressed 
themselves quite definitely on the 
matter. We are hoping to have an 
8 hour day within a few weeks. 
That will help much. In other re- 
spects the nursing profession is still 
in the Middle Ages — too much dead 
militarism and old traditions that 
hamper one on every hand. I have 
learned that the teaching profession 
is relatively too modest and self de- 
precatory when it strains and tugs in 
every direction for reform and feels 
its own inadequacy all the time. It 
is a hundred times more modern in 
some respects than the nursing pro 
fession. I do believe that there is 
need of more educated people in the 
nursing ranks. It can be made a 
much greater profession, more scien 
tific and intelligent but a lot of pio 
neer work has still to be done. I 
want to study medicine myself, but 
just now I feel more or less bound to 
go on and finish my training. The 
nurses whose places we took are not 
back from Europe as yet, and times 
are more or less abnormal still. 
Some day I hope I may. 

The Vassar girls are fine — there 
are 37 of them still left in Bellevue, 
three died of pneumonia, about ten 
had to leave because of poor health 
following the epidemic — all of us bad 
the influenza — and some have gone 
abroad in Y. M. or Y. W. work. 
They are girls from the finest fami- 
lies in the country and it has been an 
inspiration to know them." 



Chambers 
Studio 

209 S. State St. .Chicago 
Republic Bldg. 



Spalding Ice Skates 




For Every Member of the Family 

Toboggans, Skis, Snowshoec, 

Hockey Supplies, Etc. 

Catalogs oil request. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

211-217 So. State Street, Chicago, III. 



The V^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 
/. B. Veselsfay 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision 'Dealers 



Grocery Market 

807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 

Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



%7A 00 takes beautiful new 

T* *' $250.00 mahogany 6nish 

phonograph and records. Never used. 
60 inches high. Latest design. Will ship 
C. O. D. on approval. 

Mrs. Waverly Brown 
317 Greenleai Ave., Wilmette, Illinois 



92 



THE STENTOR 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C., the college work for the rest of the 
year will he reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — will be 
continued for this year; consequently the second term will open on Tuesday, Jan. 7. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, HI. 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 

C.G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 

Cleaning and Pressing . . $1.50 

Pressing ... . . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 



At 



French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



—J 



AMES MITCHELL 
E WELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m- 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Go. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, February 7, 1919. 



NUMBER 13. 



L. F. Wins One - Loses One 



Monmouth Defeated 
34- 15 

On Friday night, January 31, the 
team hit its real stride and did not 
succumb to either ennui or fatigue 
and the result was the defeat of Mon- 
mouth by the score of 34-15. Theteam 
was changed around with Marsh at 
forward and Eddy at guard and the 
new combination was very effective. 
Marsh and Sumner led the scoring 
with five and four baskets respective- 
ly. The team-work was much better 
than the previous week and the team 
kept a good deal of its pep through- 
out the game. The one weak point 
was in basket shooting, Sumner es- 
pecially missing more than four fifths 
of his shots. Marsh played well con- 
sidering that he had only practised 
four nights, and Stuart Eddy played 
a good game at guard in spite of his 
lame ankle. McCormack was a bit 
off on his shots but played the floor 
well and got in some good passes to 
the forwards. Johnnie Rees played 
his usual strong game at guard. For 
Monmouth Wilson and Holliday play- 
ed the best. On the whole the team 
showed considerable improvement 
over the form shown in the Beloit 
game and should continue to improve 
as better basket-shooting is devel- 
oped. 

The line-up: 
Lake Forest (84) Monmouth (15) 



Marsh R. F. 

Sumner L. F. 

McCormack C. 

Eddy . R. G. 

Rees L. G. 

Baskets — Marsh 5, 

Cormack, Eddy, Rees 

day 2. 

Free Throws — Eddy 10, Wilson 9 

Referee — ■ Brown, Miami. 

Ruth Kenyon visited friends 
Northwestern last week end. 



Wilson 

Holliday 

Axline 

Berry 

Cook 
Sumner 4, Mc- 
, Wilson, Holli- 



at 



Beatrice Worthley spent the week 
end with friends in Chicago. 



Knox Cops Game 
30 - 28 

Perhaps the fastest and most excit- 
ing game of the season occurred Mon- 
day night when Knox met the Red 
and Black on our floor. The Knox 
team, minus Ziggy Hamblin and one 
of their regular guards started off 
with a flash and had our gang rat- 
tled with their shifty floorwork and 
passing. Soon, however, the guards 
solved the passing, and the ball was 
kept well down in the enemies' ter- 
ritory. Just about that time Eddy 
cut off diplomatic relations with a 
Knox man and both were exiled. The 
first half ended with Lake Forest in 
the lead 14 to 12. 

Both teams came back with a rush 
in the second half but Knox's superior 
team work and stamina showed up 
and they forged ahead. Lake Forest 
showed signs of life and tied the 
score, 26 all. With two minutes to 
play, Rogers of Knox caged a basket 
from midfield. Marsh then dropped 
in a free throw and added another a 
few seconds later. Rogers then fin- 
ished the scoring by copping another 
basket. Final Score — Knox 30, Lake 
Forest 2 8. 

For Knox, Rogers was the shining 
light, along with the team's excellent 
passing and floorwork. McCormack 
and Jack Rees, as well as Marsh, 
fought hard for the Red and Black. 

The team still seems to lack the 
final drive and endurance and no 
doubt if the fellows buckled down 
and really trained we would have no 
trouble in coming out on the long end 
of the score — and they're going to do 
it! ! Let's on 'em! 



Knox 



Bl FIPI T 



F. 
F. 



Rogers — R. 
Willsie — L. 
Murphy — C. 
Holmes — R. G. 
Whitemarsh — L. 
Hoover — R. G. 
Crabbe — L. G. 



G. 



6 


4 


3 


3 





2 


























1 


2 





1 


2 





1 



Officer 666 

Coming Soon 

The Garrick Club is showing the 
real stuff it is made of this year by 
putting on another play so soon af- 
ter "Jack Straw." The new play is 
a three act farce, "Officer 6 66." It 
ran in Chicago two years ago and 
proved to be a howling success. The 
Garrick Club is confident that its pro- 
duction will be equally as good. 

The play will be given March 7th 
and rehearsals have already begun. 
Rejnember the date because it will be 
the big thing of the year in the way 
of dramatics. 

THE CAST 

Bastaeto Joseph Sieux 

Michael Phelan,) 

Officer 666) Carson Hoover 

Whitney Barnes Vernon Downs 

Travers Gladwin. . .Paul Offenheiser 

Helen Burton Margaret Horton 

Sadie Small Eleanor Goble 

Mrs. Burton Mildred Gerlach 

Alfred Wilson. .. .Francis McFerran 

Watkins Tom Hale 

Police Captain Stone. .James Leonard 

Kearney Merle McEvoy 

Ryan L. Martin 

Violin Concert in Chapel 

The students and faculty enjoyed a 
real treat on Thursday morning when 
Gereldine Massey and Dr. Van Steen- 
deren played in chapel. Both are 
artists and their music was extreme- 
ly enjoyable. 

They played several selections from 
the first and second Duos by Dancla. 
Even though "Van" did say that the 
music described a trip to the dentist's 
office, we all enjoyed it immensely. 
We only hope that they will play for 
us again soon — very soon. Such pro- 
grams make chapel exercises the most 
inspiring and enjoyable part of the 
day. 



Lake Forest 



BIFI PI T 



Sumner — R. F. 
Marsh — L. F. 
McCormack — C. 
Eddy — L. G. 
Rees, J. — R. G. 
Rees, D. — L. G. 

Referee — Brown — Miami 



4 





1 


1 


6 


2 


3 








1 


2 


2 


1 





1 








1 



94 



THE STENTOR 



Music School Notes 

Joseph Bonnet Gives Concert 
in Lake Forest 

Last Saturday evening Joseph Bon- 
net, the distinguished French organ- 
ist gave an organ recital in the First 
Presbyterian Church. His delivery 
delighted his audience because of its 
clarity and dignity of style, and its 
mastery of technique. M. Bonnet 
made a deep impression by his dig- 
nified and artistic treatment of an 
instrument that is often misused. 
His playing was marked by much 
freedom, clearness, and perfection of 
articulation, both on manuals and 
pedals. He shows a true sense of 
rhythm and a fine taste in registra- 
tion that sought appropriate timbres 
and avoided the bizarre. 

Bonnet is not only an artist and 
virtuoso, but a scholar and a pro- 
found musician of the highest attain- 
ments. His coming to America at 
this time is most opportune and al- 
ready is exerting an influence that is 
far reaching. The audience, on Sat- 
urday evening, was a representative 
one, and to its enthusiastic applause 
M. Bonnet responded generously with 
a number of encores. 



Margaret, in speaking of Bonnet's 
concert, "I liked particularly the lit- 
tle gazette that he played. 



This week end has been a gay one 
for the Music School. On Friday af- 
ternoon some of us heard Jacques 
Thibaud in an inimitable Mozart Con- 
certo with the Chicago Symphony. 
Others were tempted by the Oriental 
magnificence of Chu Chin Chow. Mrs. 
George E. Newcornb graciously invited 
the Music School to meet Mrs. Mid- 
dleschulte, wife of the former organ- 
ist of the Chicago Symphony Orches- 
tra and herself a prominent organist, 
at tea on Saturday afternoon. The 
hours were from four to six but music 
and general conversation proved so 
attractive that only a Bonnet concert 
brought an end to a delightful after- 
noon. 



Vesta called all of her friends into 
her room the other night to help her 
capture a little white animal playing 
around under her radiator. After a 
grand scramble they found a piece of 
bread. 



Miss Emma Harriet Osgood, harp- 
ist of the School of Music was its 
guest for the Bonnet Concert. 



Mrs. Arthur Milinowski of Buffalo, 
N. Y., is visiting Miss Milinowski at 
the Music School. 



Jen and Mary 

O fur the love 
O waffles! if something 
Would only happen 
Something to fill up 
A few lines of this 
Empty colyum 
Just a little something — 
A murder with a 
Mystery to unravel 
Oh! girls — that 
Would be inspiring! 
Or a suicide or two 
With letters left behind 
And life sized photos 
And life histories 
Ah me — how enticing 
Or — oh happy thot! ! 
A bit of scandal — 
Juicy, exhilarating, 
And entrancing slander. 
O, rapturous life, 
O, bliss beyond compare, 
That would ' keep us going for a 
month. 



We hear, through one of our bold- 
est subscribers, that our policy of 
indiscriminate slamming is wearing 
on the nerves of our anxious readers; 
that our, shall we say, acidity, is 
hard on the disposition. Now, since 
our one desire is to please, we shall 
reform entirely and endeavor to serve 
only very sweet things. 

We shall forego our charter mem- 
bership in the Royal Order of the 
Sacred Crab, an apply for a member- 
ship in the Merry Sunshine Circle. 

In fact we are glad to announce 
that plans are under way to convert 
our precious colyum into a Pollyanna 
Corner. At least we shall sling out a 
sample next week. 



Just one last crab for auld langs' 
syne. An outsider might judge this 
edition to be part of The Grundy Let- 
ter Writer or Epistles from our Great- 
est Authors. I leave it to you, tho 
if it ain't a darn good letter contest? 



We ain't no pout 

But, Gosh, we know ut 

And when we're thru w'th ut 

We say adieu to'ut. 



Mrs. Fred Martin of Watseka, 111. 
is visiting her daughter Josephine. 



Lillian Evans spent several days at 
her home in Racine. 



Glee Club Joins 
New Organization 

Last Friday evening a meeting of 
all the members of the College Wo- 
men's Glee Club was held at Lois 
Hall, for the purpose of combining 
the College Glee Club with that of 
Ferry Hall and the Music school, thus 
being able to give more ambitious 
programs. Mr. Phillips, the director 
of the club spoke of putting on an 
operetta soon, and this can only be 
done with the hearty co-operation of 
both the members of the club and the 
other students also. 

Everyone will remember the great 
success of the operetta undertaken 
last year by Mr. and Mrs. Phillips, 
and so we hope for a most successful 
season this year. 



Famous Actress 

Visits Campus 

"Come on see little Eva Tanguay," 
rang through the hall Sunday even- 
ing. Soon a large crowd gathered on 
the second floor where the egotistical 
Eva was performing at her very best. 

"You won't forget me after I'm 
gone" she sang in shrill tones. "I 
know you won't will yuh?" 

Her hair stood on end as it always 
does and she looked startling in her 
blue — blue costume. And it was 
some costume at that. Eva always 
wears some of that freakish stuff. 

"I've made you laugh for all these 
many years and I've smiled at yah 
from the newspapers and you'll re- 
member me, won't yuh, after I'm 
gone?" And everybody vowed that 
they'd never forget that spectacle. 

"Folks say I can't sing and I can't 
dance but I don't care!!! I always 
have a good time and I always make 
you laugh." 

'i hen the happy Eva finished up by 
singing a song entitled — "Why didn't 
they send Eva Tanguay over there?" 
It sure was some act and everyone 
went to their rooms feeling like — 
studying? Oh no, Pep — Pep — Pep! 

Eva confided to the author of this 
here article that she was liable to 
perform most any time especially 
when she had much Greek and Phil- 
osophy lessons to do. 

She's some girl is this Eva Tan- 
guay. 



Hazel Seguin and Eleanor Goble 
entertained Lois Sprowles, Ex. '21, 
over the week end. 



THE STENTOR 



95 



Haw One Perfectly Good Day Was Ruined, 
A Mslerdrammer 



It is a Sunday morning with 
spring-like breezes in the air that 
beckon one to the great outdoors that 
the poets rave about. The inmates 
of Lois Hall are recuperating from a 
big night at the basket-ball game. 

Thin girl (hospitably offering but- 
terless brown bread and skimmed 
milk with a charming smile) "Here 
girls, help yourselves. Look at that 
milk, nary a bit of cream on it. I 
can just see the cook using it for our 
coffee and substituting water." (With 
a sarcastic smile for the benefit of the 
girl absorbing grape fruit) "How 
neatly those grape fruit seeds land on 
the floor, its just wonderful." 

Blonde girl with dimples — "Oh, 
wasn't Keith Marsh grand in the 
game? I saw him look at me once, 
too. Do you think — ?" 

Tall one — "No, I don't think. I 
think he was bound to have his face 
in that direction once during the 
evening." (To freckled girl). "May 
I wear your spats this afternoon? 
You know, I am going out walking 
with — ." 

Freckled one — "Yes, yes, anything 
you want. Say, I feel like a million. 
Hot water, just think of that. Now, 
its a pretty good world after all. I'm 
as happy as a bat in spite of the fact 
that we're poor but proud, my nose 
was a sad mistake, etc., etc. Who 
wants to go to church with me — that 
shows how rash I am. I'm going 
on a walk and then make heaps and 
gobs of fudge." 

All the girls — "Oh, you're the dear- 
est girl!" 



Just then a bell is heard and all 
listen except the freckled one who 
got over listening the first month of 
iier school career. 

Blond girl, W. D. — "Why, I do be- 
lieve that's your bell. At least I 
thought it was. Of course the maid 
is new and — !" 

Freckled on 
attempting to look unconcerned). "So 
it is." (Under her breath) "Probably 
a call from Dad." 

She goes to phone followed by the 
rest close at her heels who whisper 
with true sisterly spirit, "Gee, I hope 
it's a man. Won't it be grand. And 
she never has dates. Shes a peach 
but the men don't seem to fall for 
her." 

Freckled one — (clutches receiver 
and pipes out, "Hello, yes, who?" 
( Her voice changes from syrup and 
honey to one of deep disgust. "One 
formal, two informal, and four busi- 
ness letters. Four o'clock? Ye gods! 
Edith Wise five, Katherine Horton 
four." (Continues to name all of the 
freshmen girls with mysterious num- 
bers after them) "What did you say, 
Long theme?" 

"Final exam, tomorrow!" (At that 
she is borne to her room. Everybody 
seems to be talking at once. "Where 
does he get that five? Why, I hand- 
ed in almost every one. That man's 
batty. Who ever heard of having all 
your work in on time!" 

The curtain goes down on a touch- 
ing scene. The Freckled One, minus 
walk, date, candy, and church is seen 
using theme paper and ink freely. 



Petition Produces 
Astounding Results 



"God helps those who help them- 
selves" so said the ancient sage and 
so say the girls of Lois Durand Hall. 
On Sunday last we sallied forth from 
church with an unchristian feeling 
in our hearts for the dinner which 
we naturally expected we should have 
to endure — as we have endured for 
the last four months. But upon en- 
(Turning pale butj tering tne Hall we detected an odor 



Miss Powell Entertains 
Senior Girls 

Last Sunday afternoon, the girls of 
the Senior Class were entertained by 
Miss Powell at after-dinner coffee. 
There are eight members of the class 
in the Hall and the chief topic of con- 
versation among them now is, natur- 
ally, the plans for next year. The 
careers and professions under consid- 
eration are varied and ambitious and 
we sincerely hope they will all mater- 
ialize. 



Eloise Brown and Virginia Wales 
attended a dinner dance at the Edge- 
water Beach Hotel, Thursday even- 
ing. 



which we thought we remembered 
from the dim and distant days of 
home life as roast chicken. 

We fairly held our breaths until 
those doors were opened. Then there 
was a rush en masse toward them. 
Oh joy and bliss! Our fondest 
dreams were true. Chickens as well 
roasted and delicious as our fancies 
could imagine graced every table, and 
there were sweet potatoes too. If our 
dispositions have been a wee bit 
sweeter the past week and our eyes 
a bit brighter and our laughter a bit 
lighter, oh cook we thank you! And 
may the days be long before we again 
are forced to remind you that girls 
must eat to live, and that we love 
chicken! 



Mr. and Mrs. A. P. McClay of Du- 
buque, Iowa, visited their daughter 
Lorraine several days last week. 



Alberta Vasey, Ex. '21, of Iowa City, 
was the guest of Beatrice Worthley 
last week. 



Ruth Kennedy visited in Chicago 
over the week end. 



Mr. Roberts Speaks 
at Y. W. C. A. 

On Thursday evening, January 
30th, the Rev. George Roberts. Jr. 
addressed the girls of the Young 
Women's Christian Association of 
Lois Durand Hall. The subject of 
his brief talk was "Follow Christ." 
Practically all the girls in the hall 
were present. This was most for- 
tunate as the address was one of the 
most inspiring we have had this year. 
The girls appreciate Mr. Roberts in- 
terest in the Y. W. C. A and hope he 
may speak to them soon again. 



Otto Brunner is back on the cam- 
)us once more. 



"Ruby" McVicar visited Omega Psi 
on Monday. 



Leon McFerran visited Phi Pi over 
the week end. 



"Prof" Troutman gained a lot of 
unearned notoriety over Sunday. 



Ray 
got?" 



Moore: 



'Whose check you 



Paul Offenheiser spent the week 
end with his parents in Freeport. 



96 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 
Board of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '19. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Lawrence Maplesden, '21. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Otis Chatfield-Taylor, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

Horace Horton, '21. 

Howard Wood, '22. 

Professor W. R. Bridgeman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



Meditations of a 

Stentor Contrib 

Our contrib looks at a calendar and 
at wrist watch and makes a painful 
mental calculation. There yet re- 
mains thirty minutes before a well 
known figure will loom up in her 
door-way and will demand on offer- 
ing for this weeks Stentor. Ye gods! 
What to do? Something must be 
done and at once. Far better were 
suicide than to attempt to confess that 
inspiration had failed at the last mo- 
ment. Oh for a clue!! What shall 
be the turn our literary genius will 
take this week? Shall we try some- 
thing new and startling, something a 
trife risque', to add zest to the col- 
umns of the paper? Nay, nay, 
'Twould never pass the eagle eye of 
the censor so why waste energy? 
How about a stirring editorial, or 
shall we comment on food conditions 
in Lois Durand Hall? Or shall we 
try our hand at fiction? Perhaps a 
little inside dope like "The Secret 
Confessions of a Gum Chewer" or a 
little poem entitled "My Romeo" par- 
odied on that old time favorite, "My 
Rosary" would prove interesting and 
entertaining as well as educational. 
It might run thus — 



"The hours I spent with thee, dear 

heart, 
Are as a hazy dream to me — 
I can't recall them when from thee 

apart 

My Romeo! My Romeo — " 

Aha! that were clever. That 
oughta get by, but somehow it seems 
to lack the pep to make it a sure 
winner — but we make a mental reser- 
vation that we may try poetre some 
time — when we aint got nothing else 
to do. As a pastime its only excell- 
ed by indoor croquet. 

But that is not buying the baby a 
shirt, as the well known Bacon (Sir 
Francis) was often heard to quote, 
and our colyum still stares us in the 
face. Oh well, by our wrist watch 
our time is up and we can't bear to 
face our "boss's" wrath so we think 
we'll just run down and slip this un- 
der the door and try and get away 
with it. We're like Eva Tanguay — 
"We don't care." 



Them's Exactly 

Our Sentiments 

Dearest Louie: 

Ther's a professor hear that dozent 
kno anny other way to get exercize 
sew wonse a weak he trys to tell us 
freshmen how to rite letters. I had 
to rite won annyway, and sew, being 
awear of the imperrtinent fack that 
ya haven't had no letter frum yurs 
luvingly sinse I last rote two you the 
last time, and knoing how intrusted 
ya are in the accomppllshmunts of 
jur wurstwhile frend, I shal excom- 
municate to you sum of our doings 
on. 

One funny thing that hapenned 
wass this. About a weak a-go the 
Juniors (they try too be gronups but 
they're called juniors) threw there 
big affair, which is called a prom. 
I ast sum buddy an they told me that 
was short for promenade which means 
walk. That must be a joak, being 
it semes silly when we dansed most 
of the time except when we wasent. 
Well — as I wasent sayin, it seems 
there is won swell birdereen in the 
Hall (its a regular bilding and has 
rooms in it, but its called a hall, 
see?) that had five or 6 bids to this 
here costume show called Prom, and 
jest fer fun she rote a article for 
"The Stentor" which is the mouth 
organ of everybuddy's opinions and 
toots wunst a weak. Well this girl 
portends to rost the men for asking 



outside girls, meening of course, that 
she was jelous that they hadent awl 
ast her. Well they'res a pretty good 
crowd of men round hear, and in this 
inst. (Mr. Troutman says you should- 
ent say that so don't let him no) they 
shoed pure sortsmanship, for they got 
sore. Well there's anuther man 
which reely is quite smart, so that 
weere supprised that he didn't se thru 
the joak becuz he was so tense. Well 
he inducks a pillar. I mean a column 
(thats just a part of the paper) which 
he names "Pass In Review," which 
ought to be speled "Passin' Revue" 
and is nothing but "Follies." Wal 
sew he made sum pointed remarks 
and then it wuz the girls' turn to get 
sore. 

As things now rest, or ruther don't 
rest, the men act funy to most of the 
gurls for fere they mite by aksident 
akt decent to the gurl what rote the 
artikle, and the gurl what did rite it 
gose rite on haveing all the good 
dates and the rest suffers in the 
hall. 

Do you think thats' fare? Speak- 
ing of fare", whut do ya kno? The 
freshmen (thats us) are going to give 
the bigest danse of the seson in a 
cupple of weaks. Everybodys goeing 
to it. Hoping yur on riding terms 
with the rale way, 

I remane, 
Yur loving, 

Aggie Tist. 

P. Z. Rite me all the noos frum the 
fowks in Spodunk, give them my best 
reguards and oblige, 

A. T. 



Personals 



"Don" Woods spent Monday re- 
newing acquaintances at Digamma. 



Fred Kelley has returned to school 
again. 



"Bob" Framberg decides suddenly 
to spend Sunday afternoon with Di- 
gamma. 



1916. Ensign Cyrus H. Karraker, on 
his discharge from the Navy, has 
taken a position to teach History in 
the West Chicago High School. 



1916. Lieut. Stanley Anderson is 
acting as adjutant to the provost 
marshal general of military police for 
the district of La Rochelle, a terri- 
tory about as large as Rhode Island. 
He probably will not get back to 
America for some time. 



THE STENTOR 



97 



One - Two - Three ! 
Holler!! 

Friend Sal: 

Well Sal nothing doing around this 
here Lewis Hall as usual, only I hear 
as how we've got a lot of them Con- 
scious Objectors around these parts. 
You know Sal I always said them 
folks would do something nutty if 
they was left to themselves hut that 
Sykey Rite man never did pay no at- 
tention to me. Well they done it just 
as I told you. Of course we spilled 
their beans and now everything's 
O. K. again but for a while I sure was 
scared. 

You see Sal its like this, when 
them there objectors get to objectin 
there's no telling where they'll stop. 
We've put up with a lot this year but 
this time they sure was going farther 
than Old Bill did when he skipped 
out of Krautland. Do you know Sal 
they had the nerve to object to our 
hollerin out the windows of this here 
dorm at fellers what just came over 
a purpose to hear us holler? Now 
can you heat that? And let me tell 
you Sal it wasn't like if we was hol- 
lerin in the daylight when them plutes 
what live on Kerrigan Road could 
hear us. No Sal we wouldn't . do 
nothin like that. We always do our 
hollerin after 10 P. M. at night. 
There can't nobody see us then unless 
they come closer than 1 block off and 
anyhow who cares? 

Now Sal I ask you would any body 
but a hunch of prunes what never 
get a chance to holler object to a 
thing like that unless they had the 
objectin habit. And you know Sal 
its this objectin habit what worries 
me. There's no tellin what it'll lead 
up against. Next thing we know 
they'll be sayin this is one of them 
Old Maids homes and no men dast 
come here only on Wednesdays or 
Fridays or somethin like that. You 
know Sal they come most any time 
now and its so cheerful like to run 
over a lot of men every time you 
turn around. If it was the same fel- 
lers all the time I wouldn't say nothin 
but there's all of 6 different ones 
what hangs around constant, and I 
always did say variety was sauce for 
the goose. 

Well Sal as I said before we sure 
set hard on them this time and be- 
lieve me they won't do much objectin 
no more. 



Pass in Review 

We hear that a Board of Censor- 
ship has been suggested for the Sten- 
tor (this column especially). It's a 
rotten pun, but may we not suggest 
that if the spice is taken out of the 
Stentor, people will be Bored from 
Censorship. 



Marsh asked us the other day if 
Half Day was still wet. Why he 
picked on us we don't know, but we 
said we guessed it was wet. 

"Who the deuce has a bicycle?" 
asked Keith. 



Coach Mather asked some one 
where Charlie Chapman was. McFer- 
ran said, "Oh he's married and prob- 
ably got a family." 

"He's certainly got the right idea," 
said Love Martin with much feeling. 



Whitey said he was glad he was 
born handsome instead of with a good 
voice. 

To which Ray Moore replied, 
"What if you have both like I have?" 



Yours for hollerin, 



Jill. 



Would you say that the philosophy, 
"I think, therefore I am" came from 
a Cartesian well of thought? 



Zelma Farwell — "I certainly think 
Ned McCormack is the most grace- 
ful basket-ball player I ever saw!" 



A new society has been organized. 
The members are Speidel, Mudge, and 
McCormack. We are pledged. It 
goes by the name of Sigma Omicron. 
That's all we can reveal, as it is a 
very secret organization, not to say 
select. 



Helen B. wants to join, and her 
name is under consideration. 



Another nourishing order observed 
on the campus is the Anti-Roughneck 
Society. Its members, chiefly of the 
faculty, wear as a badge of distinction 
immaculately shaven necks. 



A Day With 

Dr. Nollen 

Hotel Regina, Bologna, Italy, 
Oct. 17, 1918. 

"Do you want to know how the 
day runs for a General Secretary of 
the Y.M.C.A. in Italy? Well, here 
goes for a chronicle. 

Up at 7, shave and literally gym- 
nastic exercises in room, and shower 
in bath room unheated (either room 
or water) with temperature showing 
the breath. Caffe-latte with bread 
and a little American jam in the 
breakfast room on our ground floor, 
recently opened (most of the spoiled 
Americans around me taking eggs). 
Glance over the Resto del Carlino for 
the news of the day, progress of the 
allied armies, President Wilson's an- 
swers to Germany, ravages of the In- 
fluenza, etc. Take out of my desk 
huge file of unanswered correspond- 
ence and begin to dictate to Mr. Pef- 
fers or Miss Street, hoping this time 
to clean up the accumulation during 
my last trip. First interruption af- 
ter five minutes, a little Venetian ar- 
tist who wants to sell us a photograph 
of the King, but hasn't just the thing 
we need as a model for an oil painting 
to match the one of President Wilson 
on the wall of my office. Dictation. 
After three minutes, Mrs. Shank, wife 
of the Consul at Palermo, must see 
me for authority to check as baggage 
a box of prunes she has bought at the 
army commissary for her husband's 
weak stomach (she, by the way, being 
a Christian Scientist). Dictation. 
Four minutes, and one of the Secre- 
taries must see me before going to 
his new post, and insists on showing 
me some of his remarkable collection 
of pictures, programs and other me- 
mentos of his last post. Dictation. 
Six minutes, and another Secretary 
must see me with an urgent message 
from Rome. Dictation. About three 
minutes, and the Colonel of the Cara- 
binieri is announced who looks after 
all our safe-conducts, a very nice man 
who brings for a brief salutation. 
Five minutes, and a secretary comes 
in to submit a new form of worker's 
permit. Dictation, 'steen minutes, 
and a lady is announced, wife of the 
head of one of the local hospitals, 
wishing to work with us. Dictation. 
Fully seven minutes, and new head 
of our cinema department presents his 
letters of introduction. Dictation. 
Few minutes, and case comes up of 
man who has come down from Paris 
without movement order or funds and 
expects us to send him on to Corfu, 
(Cont. on next page) 



98 



THE STENTOR 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



use BOWMAN'S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-109 Vine Ave 



just like that. Categorical negative. 
In this way noon comes along, with- 
out much thinning of the correspond- 
ence file. Go to Hotel Savoia for table 
d'hote lunch, costing the small sum 
of five lire. At 2, hour and a half's 
conference with newly arrived secre- 
taries, followed by individual confer- 
ences assigning them to their posts 
at the front or in the city areas. Call 
with Marchese on the Intendente Gen- 
erate (heap hig chief of commissary, 
transportation, etc., for the army) to 
discuss further developments in our 
work. More dictation, with more inter- 
ruptions. At 7 to 8 dinner at Corona 
d 'Italia with other secretaries. Even- 
ing discussion of problems with Mr. 
Hurrey and Marchese. Bed at 11, or 
later. 

"What an awfuly stupid day!" I 
hear you both exclaim, but it isn't 
quite as bad as it sounds if you are 
only interested in people and can 
laugh quietly inside at the funny 
things they do or wish. And then 
the days are not all like that. Some 
of them are much more exciting, as 
for instance, when you have a chance 



to go through the first line trenches 
and hear the queer song of the shells 
as they come swooping up from the 
enemy lines, and watch them explode 
in puffs of smoke more or less near, 
and go along and pick up a fresh 
shell case where the shrapnel has just 
exploded in a corner of the trench 
not so many yards from where you 
were standing. But even this is more 
interesting than alarming, because in 
the ordinary every-day lazy bombard- 
ment there is very little danger of 
getting hit in the little bit of the zig- 
zag trench in which you are, and you 
can even tell pretty well from the 
tone of the song whether the thing 
is hurtling just your way, and then 
you may have time to duck swiftly 
into a little rabbit warren of a shelter 
in the face of the trench. Of course 
it's ALTOGETHER different when a 
real battle is on, when the bombard 
ment gets fast and furious, and when 
everybody better keep away from the 
first lines who hasn't got immediate 
business there connected with trying 
to get the other fellow first, — and 
(Continued on next page) 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



FRANK BULOW 

Barber 

Under Jensen's Shoe Store 
RAILROAD TICKETS 



JgkThe- 
Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TR1EBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 1 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



C. T. Gunn Co. 

Grocers 

Agency Huyler's Gondii's 

Curtice Bros. Goods LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Wh\>? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



"C I 1"R U T CLT"V Successors 

JVUDlJ/LrOlV I Harry Levi 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 



Fitzgerald Toxica b Company 

For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



99 



Established mi 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 

Ti-lb W. South Water Street 
Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



Dr. C.W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists • 
200 Westminster East 
Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

12: t'0 m. 5:0(1 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



IllllllllillllllllllllilUlllllllUlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

("^LASS Pins and Rings. 

^"^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 

SPEIS BROS 



27 E. MONROE ST. 

CHICAGO 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave, Highland Park, 111. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 
S~y For Light 

I y/7 ^ For Heat 
XJVIO ForPower 

North Shore Gas Co. 

■■■■II 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor^StevensjBldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusive 
Dry Goods Store 




Dry Goods 

WShopfor 
^Womens&Childrens Furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

EXPRESSMAN I 

Special Attention Given to Students <•' 



TELEPHONE | 
NUMBERS I 



Residence 675 
Office 384 



then still other days are wonderfully 
interesting, when you are rolling 
through some of the marvellous scen- 
ery of beautiful Italy, just feasting 
your eyes on all the glories around, 
and wishing Muvver and the little 
daughters were there too to make 
your joy complete. 

Have you heard the latest soldier 
song that the last secretaries have 
brought with them? Well, here's 
about the way it goes: 

Good moooooorning, Mr. ZipZipZip, 
With yr hair ctjsts short as mine 
Good mooooorning, Mr. ZipZipZip, 
You sure are looking fine! 
Ashes to ashes, and dust to dust, 
If the camels don't get ya, the fatimas 
must, 

Good mooooooorning, Mr. ZipZipZip, 

With yr hair .ctjstsshorts 
hair ctjstsshorts 
hair ctjstsshorts mine. 

Isn't that beautifully intellectual? 
But it does go with a zip. 

But while I've been trying in this 
feeble way to pay my many epistol- 
ary debts to my daughters, it has 
grown to be tomorrow morning, and 
I must to bed to prepare for the seven 
o'clock program as usual. 

Love to Gaga and to Mother and 
much love to both of you. 

Father. 

Alumni News 

1901. Several interesting interviews 
with Supt. J. P. Scouller of the Pon- 
tiac Reformatory have appeared in 
recent issues of the Chicago Tribune. 
They show that he is taking hold of 
the problems there in a spirit of 
strong professional interest, inde- 
pendence, and authority. 



1912. We understand that Lieut. 
Joseph L. Thomas has been awarded 
the croix de guerre and promoted to 
a first lieutenancy for extraordinary 
courage in taking a detachment of 
men and saving a number of loaded 
ammunition wagons which had be- 
come isolated and were under heavy 
shell fire. 



Chambers 
Studio 

209 S. State St., Chicago 
Republic Bldg. 



Spalding Ice Skates 




For Every Member of the Family 

Toboggans, Skis. Snowshoti : , 
Hockey Supplies, Etc. 

Catalogue on request. 

A. G. SPALDING & EROS. 

211-217 So. State Street, Chicago, 111. 



TheQuality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsi\y 



Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson fTjuilding 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision Dealers 



Grocery Market 

807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 
Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



$74.00 takes beautiful new 

T * $250.00 mahogany finish 

phonograph and records. Never used. 
60 inches high. Latest design. Will ship 
C. O. D. on approval. 

Mrs. Waverly Brown 
317 Greenleaf Ave.. Wilmette, Illinois 



100 



THE STENTOR 



■II 



m 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

of LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C, the college work for the rest of the 
year will be reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — will be 
continued for this year; consequently the second term will op'en on Tuesday, Jan. 7. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, HI. 



IO!lilli!IIIII!illl!lllli« 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 



C.G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 
Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 



At 



French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



—J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 



Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Cleaning • Pressing ■ Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 

Cleaning and Pressing . . $1.50 


Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m 


FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Co. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volum XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, February 14, 1919. 



NUMBER 14. 



L. F. Shows Its Mettle in Peppy 
Game with U. of C. 



Chicago Wins Fast 

Game 

The team journeyed into the salty 
city Wednesday and tackled the lead- 
ers of the Western Conference in a 
combination basketball and jiu jitsu 
struggle. With a large floor to play 
on and shooting against glass back- 
boards, the team was unable to find 
itself for several minutes but when 
it did, the Chicago men began to hit 
the floor. At the end of the first 
half, Chicago was ahead by three 
points. Both teams came back with 
a rush in the second half and Lake 
Forest tied the score. Chicago was 
forced to put in a fresh man and the 
Maroons drew ahead, keeping the 
lead until the finish. Final score be- 
ing 2 3 to 16. There is no doubt that 
if we had played Chicago on our floor 
it would have been a different story. 

For Lake Forest, Sumner played 
exceptionally well, along with the 
guarding of the entire team and the 
flooring of the Chicago men, especi- 
ally Williams, out of whom everyone 
took a fall. 



CHICAGO 



B| F| P| T 



Hinkle, L. G. 
Kreisler, R. G. 
Gorgas, C. 
Birkhoff, R. F. 
Williams, L. F. 
Madden, L. G. 
Stegeman, C. 



LAKE FOREST 



B| F| P| T 



I 2 


o 


1 








1 


3 








4 


3 





1 





1 





















Rees, J., L. G. 
Eddy, R. G. 
McCormack, C. 
Sumner, L. F. 
Marsh, R. F. 



1 








jl 


2 











1 


3 








1 2 





1 



Kappa Sigma Initiation 

Kappa Sigma announces the initi- 
ation of Dean Barrick, Arthur Nich- 
ols, and Halstead Schick. 



Y College Defeated 
By Narrow Margin 

The team hit the trail for Chi again 
on Wednesday night, playing the 
Y.M.C.A. College on their floor. 

The team was handicapped by the 
loss of Dooley Sumner who was forc- 
ed to quit on Doc. Proxmire's orders. 
Eddy was shifted back to forward and 
Schick went in at guard. It was all 
Lake Forest in the first half; Eddy 
mowing them down by shots from all 
sides. In the second half, however, 
the "Y" came back strong and drew 
up very close, but in a finish like the 
Knox game, the L. F. team tightened 
and the score finished in our favor, 
25 to 2 3. Eddy and Marsh shone for 
Lake Forest, along with the team's 
good passing. The gang are out for 
a clean slate from now on, so let's 
help 'em go! 



Music School Gives 
First Dance 

Last Saturday night the University 
School of Music gave a most success- 
ful dance at the Durand Art Institute. 
It is the first social event this year 
at which the Academy, Ferry Hall, 
and the College have all been repre- 
sented. Everyone had such a good 
time together that we hope we can 
continue this idea during the rest of 
the year. 

The orchestra, composed of Lob- 
dell, Wilson and Bechtel, furnished 
very peppy music. Dr. and Mrs. 
Wright, Mr. and Mrs. Richards and 
Miss Millinowski acted as chaperons. 
The close of the evening came all too 
soon for everyone. 



Y.M.C.A. Meets on 
Wednesday 

The regular meeting of the college 
Y.M.C.A. was held Wednesday even- 
ing of this week in the Digamma 
rooms. Mr. Myers, who was assigned 
to the Lake Forest Unit of the S.A. 
T.C. as Y Secretary some time ago, 
was present at the meeting and gave 
a very interesting talk. The main ad- 
dress of the evening was given by 
Coach Brown of the Academy. He 
gave some of his experiences and drew 
very profitable conclusions from them, 
especially urging the men to take 
great 'interest in athletics, as the real 
life of the college. The talk was a 
very interesting and most profitable 
one for the men present. 

The next regular meeting will be 
held in the Omega Psi rooms on next 
Wednesday evening at seven o'clock. 
All men are urged to be present. 



Digamma Gives Girls 
a Jolly Good Time 

"How perfectly adorable!" 

"Isn't it marve?" 

"Oh's" and "Ah's" in various and 
sundry tones of surprise and pleasure. 
Such were the exclamations one made 
on seeing the old Beta Rho rooms 
decorated for the occasion of the Di- 
gamma party last Friday evening. 

The Digams did themselves well in 
giving their thirty odd guests a royal 
time. Entertainment was offered to 
suit each and every sane temper- 
ament. Cards, fortune telling and mu- 
sic were featured upstairs while the 
inviting strains of a victrola enticed 
those addicted to the terpsichoreanart 
to display their powers when they 
were not consumed with envy watch- 
ing Professor Van's solo dancing. 

"The most delicious and gratifying 
refreshments were served. After this 
the party broke up and the "good 
nights" and "I had a wonderful 
time's" were said with much inward 
rebellion. 



102 



THE STENTOR 



Music School Notes 



Eddy Brown to Give Con- 
cert Saturday Evening 

It will be a delight to welcome an- 
other musical celebrity on the even- 
ing of Saturday, February fifteenth. 
Eddy Brown began his career as an 
infant prodigy^ and developed his 
genius under the two greatest master 
teachers of modern times, Hubay 
and Auer. With his appealing and 
spontaneous manner he captivates his 
audiences at once, and holds them by 
the power and delicate refinement of 
his playing. He has chosen a fascin- 
ating program which includes Tar- 
tini's celebrated Deal's Tree Sonata. 
Tickets may be procured at North 
Hall. The rates are a dollar and a 
half for University people but unre- 
served seats at the back of the hall 
may be had for seventy-five cents. 



The School of Music has had its 
first dance. The guests, who came 
from the College, Ferry Hall and the 
Academy were received by Miss Mil- 
inowski, Dr. and Mrs. Wright, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Richards. The lights 
were veiled by streamers of purple 
and gold, the school colors. A most 
enjoyable time was had by all pre- 
sent. 



Georgiana Goel and Lillian Good 

were house guests of the Music School 
tor the week end. 



We are glad to announce the ad- 
dition of three new members to our 
school group. They are Virginia 
Beggs from Ashland, Illinois; June 
Suckling from Winipeg, Canada, and 
Maria Vella from Palerino, Italy. 



Jen and Mary 



We Bite 

It' a body flunk a study 

Trying to be gay, 
If a body gets too fussy 

What's a Dean to say? 

If a laddie fuss a lassie, 
Breaks a rule or two — 

If the laddie loves the lassie, 
What's the Dean to do? 

Every lassie has her laddie — 
Some have even more, 

Since the laddie feeds the lassie 
Why's -the Dean so sore? 



Lorraine wants to know why they 
call him Herb Peterson sometimes 
and Pete Erb other times. 



A Don't Disturb's a handy thing — 
You put it on your door 
And then trip out and take a fling. 
While ail the people on the floor 
In awed, admiring tones discuss 
The reformation that has made 
'Iheir friends who were so frivolous 
So very studious and staid. 



Ruth Kennedy — "I know a perfect- 
ly wonderful hospital in the city — 
why, my grandmother died there. 



Jack, cut out that cave man stuff! 



A certain denizen of Lois Durand 
was heard to murnier in puzzled ac- 
cents: "Why do they have one button 
to ring long bells and the other to 
ring short ones?" 



Last Sunday the school served at 
the usual Sunday Evening supper 

given to the sailors by the village ProfeSSOr W. R. Brid"iuail 
Y.W.C.A. Miss Colton sang and all n . r r» 

. . ., f . Keturns from Keunion 

joined in the cheery community music; «"«-»«"° *-**,**+ »»^v...»v J . 

that followed. „ , ... „ „ ., , 

Professor W. R. Bridgman has re- 
turned from a brief trip to New York. 
He attended a reunion of the Yale 
Class of '81. At this meeting the 
class entertained the sons who are in 
service. 



"Cotton' 
Digamma. 



Van Sickle is visiting 



Freddie Bates, Doc. O'Leary and 
Don Woods visited Digamma over 
the week end. 



Lake Forest Players 
Give Creditable Per- 
formance 

The plays given at the Durand Art 
Institute on Wednesday evening by 
the Lake Forest Players, Miss Frances 
Kemp, '12, Mr. Charles Mather, '14, 
and Mr. Raymond Moore, '21, were a 
decided success. The three members 
of the cast upheld their record as 
Lake Forest dramatic favorites. It 
is an interesting fact also that two 
of the plays, "The Verdict," and "The 
Lower Road", were written by Mr. 
Mather. Both are of a rather serious 
nature, although relieved by clever 
dialogue. "Two in a 'Bus" is a light, 
clever, fast moving play. It was a 
marked contrast to the other two. 
The auditorium was packed, some 
chairs being placed in the Rotunda. 
The evening was such a success that 
we hope the Lake Forest Players will 
put on another group of plays in the 
near future. 



Mrs. Crosby Enterfains 
College Women 

Last Monday afternoon the girls of 
Lois Durand Hall were entertained 
at the home of Mrs. Crosby on Sher- 
idan Road. Mrs. William H. Allison 
(Corinna Hedges), a graduate of Fer- 
ry Hall, gave a most interesting ac- 
count of her experiences as a mission- 
ary in Guatemala. Since early in the 
nineties Mrs. Allison and her hus- 
band, who is a Presbyterian minister, 
have been active missionaries to that 
country. With headquarters at 
Guatemala City they have estab- 
lished missions through the 
country, and also had founded a 
boarding school for girls. This school 
was the first of its kind in the coun- 
try, and until its destruction in the 
recent earthquake, had successfully 
opened the way for education among 
the women. Mrs. Allison is spending 
a short furlough in this country and 
upon her return hopes to reestablish 
this educational work. After Mrs. Al- 
lison had finished dainty refreshments 
were served. The college women are 
most grateful to Mrs. Crosby for her 
charming hospitality which enabled 
them to meet her interesting guest. 



Fat Brown browsed around Digam- 
ma for a little while last week. 



Helen Wheaton of Harvey, spent 
the week end with Margaret Horton. 



Things to wonder about: 
Framberg gets his line." 



'Where 



THE STENTOR 



103 



Stentor Crosses 
Rhine 

Larry Thorpe Writes 
From Germany 

Bonns Kronenhotel, 

Bad Neuenahr (Rheinland) , 

Dec. 29, 1918. 

The Stentor — 

Surely this world is full of sur- 
prises. Had Lt. Mel Gray, when I 
met him suddenly on a cross road 
near Verdun two months ago told me 
we would be doing the "Watch on the 
Rhine" at this time I probably would 
have had visions of a man with shell 
shock. Had anyone told me last 
week that a Stentor was in my mail 
I probably would have had visions of 
some one indulging in too much "fire 
water." However both things hap- 
pened, and thereby hangs a tale, and 
I should consider myself in the class 
of slackers if I did not write to show 
that I, too, hold the interest of old 
Lake Forest high in my wishes. 

The Stentor gave me more news 
of people I knew in other days than 
any I have received since I left them. 
I was surprised and grieved to learn 
of Dr. Halsey's illness, and I'm sure 
our best wishes are with him. Other 
changes in campus life also interested 
me, particularly the S. A. T. C. branch. 
Lake Forest should prove an ideal 
place for such training. 

I have met several people from 
Lake Forest over here. Lt. Walter 
Bryant, ex '18, was with me for some 
fifteen months, and Lt. Sumner Hunt 
'16 for three. On the last drive near 
Sedan I met George Stevans, son of 
Professor Stevans who used to lead 
us through the mysteries of Physics. 
He told me that his brother Carl, 
ex'16, was with him in the same regi- 
ment but I failed to find him. Indi- 
rectly I have had news of Lt. Wetzel 
'16, Lt. Dean '16. Lt. Anderson '16, 
but one surely appreciates the Sten- 
tor so I will arrange for my subscrip- 
tion through my home. 

Wishing Lake Forest prosperity in 
the New Year, 

I am 

Yours truly, 

Lt. L. G. Thorpe, '16, 

Bat. F. 150th F. A., 

42 Div. A. P. O. 715, A. E. F. 



Lois Hall Elections 

At the regular monthly house meet- 
ing of the Student Self Government 
Association of Lois Durand Hall, the 
following officers were elected: 

House President Eloise Brown 

Social Chairman Anne Merner 

Social Committee . . Margaret Horton 

Josephine Martin 

Eleanor Goble 

Mildred Gerlach 

At the close of the meeting the 
girls, by a vote of thanks, expressed 
their appreciation to Harriet Harris 
for her efficient service as house 
president in the past year and a half. 



Mrs. Wilson '13 visited at Lois 
Durand Hall on Monday, and attend- 
ed the tea given by Mrs. Crosby in 
the afternoon. Mrs. Wilson and her 
husband, who graduated in 1912, ex- 
pect to be sent to Japan by the Board 
of Missions. 



Ote Taylor's strong suit in the pie 
line is cherry a la Eddy! 



Miss Hamilton and the girls of 
Lois Durand Hall served coffee to 
their friends last Sunday afternoon 
in the big room. Several members 
of the faculty and their wives were 
present and a social hour was enjoy- 
ed — Miss Millinowski delighted every- 
one present with her beautiful play- 
ing. This is the first of a series of 
pleasant afternoons which will take 
place every two weeks, the social com- 
mittee having them in charge. 



Dr. Wright Speaks 
at Y. W. C. A. 

The speaker at the last Y.W.C.A. 
meeting at Lois Durand Hall was Dr. 
Henry W. Wright. He spoke on the 
need for Idealism among women. 

"Probably the most hide-bound 
conventionalists of the sex," he said, 
"are the college women." He em- 
phasized the fact that there is greater 
reason now than ever that women 
should think clearly and independent- 
ly. 



But 



Lake Forest College made the 
front page of the "World's Greatest 
Newspaper" for the second time this 
year. At this rate we may expect, 
in course of time, to become as notor- 
ious as some neighboring universities. 



Annie Hintz 

Dear Miss Hintz: 

Filbert and I quarreled last year 
and when school closed were only on 
speaking terms. Now that the war is 
over he has returned to the campus. 
Should I treat him coldly or with 
warmth. After all he has done his hit. 
and I sort of feel as if a man who has 
been in the war ought to be treated 
sort of good. 

Hopefully, 

W. S. 

W. S.: 

I gather from your letter that you 
are sort of strong for Filbert. Why 
don't you and he have a meeting and 
decide to mend affairs. Anyway treat 
him square and remember he's one 
of Uncle Sam's boys. 
Sincerely. 

Annie. 



Dearest Annie: 

Is it all right for a girl to wave to 
a man when he passes the dormitory 
or is it better not to. Some of the 
girls get dates that way. Answer 
soon, won't you Annie? Because he 
passes here often and I don't want to 
be losing any time. 

Pep. 

Pep: 

Sure, go ahead and wave at Joe. 
There isn't any harm in that. That's 
probably one of the reasons he goes 
by the dormitory so much. He al- 
ways responds, doesn't he. 
Always, 

Annie. 



Dear Miss Hintz: 

Robert is so big and masterful. 
He insists on holding my hand espe- 
cially at movies. I tell him not to 
but he insists! How shall I prevent 
this public demonstration. 
Distractedly, 

Doris. 

Dear Doris: 

That certainly must be most an- 
noying. Couldn't you manage to 
have your hands concealed so that he 
couldn't find them. He certainly 
wouldn't ask point blank for one of 
them. 

Yours truly, 

Annie. 



Helen Lockard is ill at the Alice 
Home. 



104 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 
Hoard of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '10. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Huth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Lawrence Maplesden, '21. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters: 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Otis Chatfield-Taylor, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

Horace Horton, '21. 

Howard Wood, '22. 

Professor W. R. Bridgeman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postofnee of Lake For- 
est. Illinois, as second-class matter. 



been forgotten at the Commons only 
for the reason that you don't feel 
like yelling after eating those delight- 
ful meals. 

Here's to a change in spirit! The 
gang plays Monmouth and Knox down 
in their dens this week, and when 
the team comes back let's give 'em 
a heluva warm reception! 



1 h 



^IS an old subject. Everyone 
has a fling at it, some quite a 
little, others just a trifle, but — 
action, no one has succeeded in get- 
ting. Coming down to real facts, — it is 
PEP that is referred to. Does any- 
one know who the basketball team 
plays this week or does anyone care 
besides the coach and seven or eight 
members of the squad? Ask some of 
the Faculty and they'll probably tell 
you they did not know Lake Forest 
had a basketball team! But yet each 
student is paying $3.00 a term to 
keep athletics in school. Someone 
asks why do we engage in athletics? 
— I think that's number 93. Why is 
it when one talks school in the sum- 
mer to some real live prospective fel- 
low (an asset to the college — not a 
wallflower) he will always ask the 
question "What kind of teams do you 
have?" or "Where do you rank among 
the schools?" Athletics is the chief 
argument to influence a real live fel- 
low into coming to a school and when 
a school has a championship team he 
is very likely to choose that school. 

Where is the old spirit that was al- 
ways shown when an L. F. team came 
on the field or on the floor? Scandal 
and gossip are easy for the vocal 
chords but when it comes to giving a 
yell everyone has a cold. Yelling has 



JUST a word might be timely in 
regard to the reappearance of 
the spirit of dissatisfaction and 
crabbing. This usually culminates in 
a declaration to leave L. F. for the 
greater freedom and opportunities of 
some nearby college or university. Of 
course we are willing to grant that 
all restrictions and rules are made for 
the sole purpose of making people 
unhappy, and that such measures are 
unknown in other institutions. The 
only thing we do object to, however, 
is the eternal threat to leave made ir 
the "then you'll be sorry" tone, and 
absolutely no such move thereafter. 
It is enough to say that we are get- 
ting tired of the old bluff. 



Alumni Notes 

1918. Kenneth H. Berst has joined 
Leon McFerran on the first step of 
the ladder with Swift & Co., Chicago. 



1918. Lieut. F. Leslie Griffith turn- 
ed up on Monday the 3rd. just having 
gone through the discharge mill at 
Garden City. His aviation experience 
includes the period of training, some 
months in charge of the flying office 
at Gerstner Field, Lake Charles, La., 
assignment to foreign service in Oc- 
tober last, and arrival in France two 
days before the armistice. He ex- 
pects to go into business in Chicago 
at once, at the same time, if possible, 
taking work in the Northwestern 
School of Commerce. He was married 
in October to Miss Ann Nylen of 
Marinette, Wise. 



1918. H. H. Leiter's present address 
is Co. 163. 10th Regiment, Quantico, 
Va. 



Margaret and Horace Horton en- 
tertained their uncle Mr. Edward 
Brigham of New York City, last week. 



Sara Moore spent several days at 
her home in Aurora, this week. 



Lake Forest Man Is 
Awarded Prize 

Harleigh Hartman, '09 
Writes Prize Egsay 

Announcement has just been made 
that the capital Prize in class A for 
the current year in the competition 
offered annually by Hart, Schaffner & 
Marx of Chicago for papers on eco- 
nomic subjects has been awarded to 
Harleigh H. Hartman, B. A., 1909, 
M.A., 1910, and L.L.M., Northwest- 
ern, 1914. The competition in class 
A is open to graduates of American 
colleges; that in class B to under- 
graduates. This year no awards were 
made in class B as the essays offered 
were not up to standard. The second 
prize in class A was given to Professor 
Howard D. Dozier, A.B., Vanderbilt 
University, 1908, M.A., Yale, 1916, 
Associate Professor of Finance, Uni- 
versity of Georgia, who presented an 
essay entitled "A History of the At- 
lantic Coast Line Railroad". The 
subject of Mr. Hartman's paper was 
"The Meaning and Application of 
'Fair Valuation' as Used by Utility 
Commissions". 

It will be remembered that Mr. 
Hartman was known as a shark on 
economic subjects during his resi- 
dence in College and as a doughty de- 
bater. At the time of Professor Hal- 
sey's leave of absence, when he took 
the trip to Panama, Mr. Hartman act- 
ed as substitute, taking his classes. 
In recent years he has been Digest 
Clerk and Librarian of the Illinois 
Utility Commissions, a post gained 
through a civil service competition. 



Sara Moore entertained her broth- 
er, Ensign Albert Moore, on Sunday. 
Mr. Moore expects to return to New 
York in a few days. 



Vera Pettigrew spent the week end 
at her home in Harvey. 



Gwendolyn and Gereldine Massey 
spent several days at their home in 

Sterling, this week. 



Katherine Horton entertained her 
mother over the week end. 



Mildred Zenos entertained her 
mother at Lois Durand Hall last 
week. 



THE STENTOR 



105 



President Wilson's Visit To Italy 

As Reported by Dr. Nollen 



Hotel Regina, Bologna. 
Jan. 7, 1919. 
Some doings, these last days. I 
think Italy has been nearer heart dis- 
ease over President Wilson's visit than 
over most great battles. He was ex- 
pected, or at least wanted, in every 
town and village in the peninsula, 
and there were constantly conflicting 
reports about his itinerary and the 
dates thereof — before Christmas, af- 
ter Christmas, the middle of January, 
and so on. Finally, official infor- 
mation on the first that he would ar- 
rive in Rome the third! Therefore 
no sooner had I gotten back from the 
Trentino on Wednesday than I had to 
plan the trip to Rome, leaving the 
next morning with Mr. Howe by auto- 
mobile, because there would have 
been no chance of railway accommo- 
dations with the extra travel added 
to the regular crush on the trains. 
We made the trip down quite com- 
fortably, the weather being warm, get- 
ting luncheon at Florence and then 
continuing by Arezzo and Perugia, 
dining at Feligno, and on over the 
steep Somma pass to Terni in the 
dark, spending the night in that in- 
dustrial center; next morning- con- 
tinuing to Rome by Civita Castellana, 
and arriving at 9:30, an hour before 
the Presidential Train was due. A 



beautiful ride, over an unexpectedly 
good road, through lovely scenery all 
the way, a total distance of about 270 
miles. 

Our Rome office had a window re- 
served overlooking the Exedra, so 
that we could see excellently the ap- 
proach of the carriages from the sta- 
tion and the formal reception by 
Prince Colonna, the Syndic of Rome, 
just below us. Of course the whole 
line of march was decorated profuse- 
ly and troops of various arms lined 
the streets on both sides. The scarlet 
liveries of the municipal coaches (far 
more brilliant than the royal turn- 
outs), the gleaning helmets of the 
cavalry escort and the great crowds 
were quite impressive, but of cheer- 
ing such as we know it there was 
none. The Italian doesn't know how 
to yell, and a concerted noise is par- 
ticularly beyond his ken. Shall we 
try to teach this art among our other 
labors? 

The later trip of the party to the 
Queen Mother's palace was less pic- 
turesque, as it was made in closed 
automobiles. In the afternoon there 
was a queer fiasco, for which the re- 
sponsibility is not altogether clear. 
At the instigation of some Americans 
who had suggested to the President 
the advisability of an address to the 



people, some of the late morning 
papers announced that Mr. Wilson 
would speak from the "Altar of the 
Country" (the big monument to Vic- 
tor Emanuel at the Piazza Venezia) 
at four, and a great crowd assembled, 
but no President, so that after wait- 
ing round about an hour the crowd 
dispersed and the movie machines 
were packed away. As on the occa- 
sion of Balaclava, "somebody blun- 
dered", and it would be interesting to 
know who and how. The next semi- 
public event was the great reception 
on the Capitol, for which tickets were 
issued of various colors according to 
the spaces in the complex of buildings 
(connected together by temporary 
wooden galleries) to which the va- 
rious categories of guests were admit- 
ted. We were among those honored 
with brown tickets, admitting to the 
great Hall of the Horatti and Curiatii, 
where in the presence of a brilliant 
crowd of notables the President was 
presented with honorary citizenship 
in Rome and responded with a brief 
speech. Mr. Wilson walked in first 
with the Queen, tall and handsome, 
on his arm, and the King followed 
with Mrs. Wilson. After the presen- 
tation the royal-and-presidential 
party walked through the other apart- 
ments to show themselves to the low- 




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106 



THE STENTOR 



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lier categories of invitees there a- 
waiting them. 

Saturday the President and Mrs. 
Wilson gave a luncheon at Ambas- 
sador Page's splendid apartment in 
the Palazzo Drago, and sixty of us 
sat down at the long table, an inter- 
esting group of distinguished people: 
the royal couple, the American, Brit- 
ish, French ambassadors and their 
ladies, the Italian ambassador at 
Washington, the Ministers of War and 
Navy, General Diaz, Admiral Thaon 
de Revel, commander of the Navy, 
Prime Minister Orlando, Baron Son- 
nino. Minister for Foreign Affairs, 
and so on. There was no after-din- 
ner speaking, the President simply 
giving a very brief toast to the King 
and Italy. 

At three o'clock the President pro- 
ceeded to call upon the Pope, follow- 
ing the old precedent by going from 
the Ambassador's (constructively 
American soil) and so avoiding go- 
ing directly from the Quirinal to the 
Vatican. This visit to the head of 
the Roman Church was immediately 
followed (quite impartially) by a visit 
to Walter Lowrie's American Epis- 
copal Church where the President 
conversed very informally and de- 
lightfully for some time with the 
representatives of the various Protes- 
tant bodies of Italy, who then return- 
ed his call at the Quirinal. It was a 
group of about twenty-five somewhat 
overly solemn folk, with all of whom 
the distinguished guest shook hands 
both on entering and on leaving; Mrs. 
Wilson too shook hands all 'round. 
It was plain that the brethren were 
rather flustered, and they inquired 
anxiously beforehand whether or no 



they should clap their hands at the 
approach of the Presence, and decided 
that it was more dignified to desist. 
But the good humor and frankness of 
the great man soon put them more 
at their ease. And this close scrutiny 
revealed the fact that the President 
is evidently In excellent health and 
spirits, apparently uncarked by wor- 
ry over his huge responsibilities. 
Certainly the reception Europe is giv- 
ing him must be a satisfaction to him. 
At nine thirty that evening the 
royal special with the Presidential 
party pulled out toward Genoa, Milan, 
Turin, Paris, all the other eagerly ex- 
pectant cities being excluded from the 
itinerary for lack of time, as Wilson 
had to be back in Paris today. But 
for us there was one more event as 
interesting as any thus far — a pri- 
vate audience with the King at the 
Villa Savoia just outside Rome. Mess- 
rs. Howe and Rae (the latter our 
Regional Director for Rome) accom- 
panied me and just before two we 
arrived for our appointment at the 
Villa, situated in a beautiful garden, 
where the royal family finds the se- 
clusion and comparative simplicity of 
true family life such as the best reg- 
ulated palace in the midst of a great 
city could hardly afford. His Maj- 
esty received us with the very demo- 
cratic cordiality which is his wont, 
shaking hands with us at greeting and 
parting, and talking with us quite in- 
formally for half an hour before he 
arose as a sign that the interview 
was ended. We brought him two sou- 
venirs — a leather-bound copy of the 
Soldier's Calendar of which we are 
distributing a million copies, and a 
gold cigarette case containing a sam- 



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THE STENTOR 



107 




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pie of the American cigarettes which 
were purchased with the money earn- 
ed by our four little girls last summer 
and which helped to comfort the 
wounded returning from the bitter 
fighting on the Grappa in the early 
days of the great and victorious of- 
fensive that ended the war. The 
King seemed to be touched by the ac- 
count of the fair given by the little 
American ladies for the benefit of the 
Italian soldiers and I hope he will 
have a word of recognition written to 
them. I rather think he will. At 
any rate, they may know that their 
kind thought for the soldiers of Italy 
has been interpreted in the highest 
places. 

Our return trip began Saturday 
evening, again we slept at Terni, and 
on Monday we came on through the 
rain by the same route to Bologna, 
reaching here shortly before midnight 
last night. 

I enclose a fairly good picture of 
the King, taken when he visited our 
Casa del Soldato at Faenza and pub- 
lished in the New York Times on 
Nov. 24. I had introduced the direc- 
tor of the local work to the King, and 
he is seen explaining things to him. 
Next to me is General Segato, Com- 
mander of the Army Corps of Bologna 
and our very good friend. You may 
note how simply His Majesty is dress- 
ed, without any decoration except the 
service ribbon which any soldier can 
wear after four months' service at 
the front, and which has been award- 
ed to our secretaries also. 



J. F. KERRIGAN ' 

EXPRESSMAN 

<•> Special Attention Given to Stud ents 

TELEPHONE / Residence 675 
NUMBERS i Office 384 



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807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 
Tel. Harrison 515. 516,517 



%7d- 00 takes beautiful new 

**" '• $250 00 mahogany finish 

phonograph and records. Never used. 
60 inches high. Latest design. Will ship 
C. O. D. on approval. 

Mrs. Waverly Brown 
317 Gr«n!e«f Ave., Wilmette, Illinois 



10S 



THE STENTOR 



lllllll!lll!IIIIIIlliiIilIIIIIIBIII!l 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C., the college work for the rest of the 
year will be reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — will be 
continued for this year; consequently the second term will open on Tuesday, Jan. 7. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, III. 



laiiBM 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 
Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 

C.G. Wenban & Son 
Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

AW. ZENGLER 

Cleaning ■ Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 

Cleaning and Pressing . . $150 

Pressing . . ... .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



—J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 



Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m- 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Co. 

Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 

Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 









The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, February 21, 1919. 



NUMBER 15. 




Camouflage 

(Drawn by the Staff Camouflager.) 

Hidden in the picture to the left 
are the famous seven on Lookout 
Point. In the center frat pins are 
flying around in swarms. They are 
looking for an appropriate resting 
place. At the extreme right four mys- 



terious forms are seen leaving Lake 
Forest. Trunks and boxes seem to be 
following. 

But so well has the artist concealed 
these important maneuvers that to 
anyone (except an inspired reporter 
on a Chicago Daily) the whole pre- 
sents the appearance of nothing sus- 
picious. 



St. Valentine Honored in Lois 



Much excitement was displayed in 
the hall last Friday. Most of the 
girls waited patiently all day for the 
florist's wagon or the box from 
Monahan's. Finally all hope was 
given up and they decided to give 
each other valentines. If any maiden 
had not been gently reminded of the 
significance of the day before, she be- 
came fully aware of it in the evening, 
when a Hall Party was staged by the 
social committee. 

The girls were paired off in coup- 
les, the girl who led had the pro- 
gram. The partners sat together at 
the dinner tables which were plenti- 
fully decorated with hearts, large and 
small. The object of the meal seem- 
ed to be to transfer as many hearts 
as possible from the table-cloth to 
one's countenance. Three of the girls 
formad a secret society on the spot. 
The insignia of this select coterie 



was a heart on the left hand. The 
secret was to leave the heart on the 
hand until some man took pity on its 
unwashed state and proposed. 

Some of the girls did not fully 
awake to the fact that a holiday had 
rolled around until the dessert ap- 
peared. Ice cream was borne in amid 
gasps of astonishment and awe. 
Wonders never cease. Cake follow- 
ed, real cake with red hearts, that 
bit one's tongue, on it. 

After dinner the girls gathered in 
the much beautified big room. There 
Bea Worthley danced the "Dance of 
the Hearts." After that dancing for 
all followed. This was accompanied 
by enthusiastic robbing. At eight 
o'clock the program ended. Like 
Mrs. Triebwasser, who had a good 
reason, we too wish there were more 
saints on our calendar. 



Team Retnrns From 
Down State Trip 

Ii. F. WINS FROM KNOX 
LOSES AT MONMOUTH 



The team, composed of Coach 
Mather, Capt. Jack Rees, Eddy, 
Marsh, McCormack, Maplesden, 
Schick, and Dave Rees. climbed on 
the rattler leaving Lake Forest at 
S:00 A. M. Friday, bound for Gales- 
burg. Arrived in Gal'esburg at 2 P. 
M. (Marsh and Maplesden benefited). 
After seeing the sights of Galesburg 
in the afternoon, the team went over 
to Monmouth in the evening. After 
dressing in a store room in a church 
the gang ran out in the snow over to 
the gymnasium (a good-looking old 
fashioned barn). The gym has only 
one side out-of-bounds and as soon 
as play started it was evident that the 
Monmouth team was well aware of 
this fact as they used it as a billiard 
table and when opportunity afforded, 
would send a man crashing against 
the wall or steam pipes. The referee 
scheduled to officiate got snowbound 
and some local man was chosen to 
referee. When the game started it 
became evident that the last match 
he refereed must have been Kid Flynn 
vs. the Battling Swede. The Mon- 
mouth team had much their own way 
for the first few minutes of play but 
when the team realized that it was a 
rough and tumble game they came 
right back and gave Monmouth a 
taste of their own game. Before the 
half ended a few of the Monmouth 
team sent Marsh crashing into one of 
the side walls and Mush came up 
with a wrenched knee. The half 
ended with Monmouth ahead 17-4. 
The Red and Black came back strong 
in the second half. Marsh remaining 
in the game, and succeeded in out- 
scoring the six man team in the 
second half but had not enough to 
win; the final score being 31 to 2 0. 
The entire Red and Black team fought 
hard and clean, but it was impossible 
for any team to defeat a six man 
team on a floor such as Monmouth 
had. For Monmouth. — well, Ax- 



110 



THE STENTOR 



The Down State Trip 

line, the center, seemed to play the 
cleanest game. 

The team journeyed back to Gales- 
burg that night on the electric and 
made the 15 miles in 2 y 2 hours. 
Saturday afternoon a doctor advised 
that Mush Marsh should not play in 
the Knox game and it looked pretty 
sad with Eddy, Mape and Schick 
crippled. Both teams were deter- 
mined to come out victorious and the 
Knox team showed its stuff when in 
the first two minutes of play they 
caged three baskets. The Red and 
Black, however, tightened and at the 
end of the first half the score was 8 
to 4. The second half started with a 
spurt for Lake Forest and they grad- 
ually crept on the Knox gang. The 
score became 14 to 13 in favor of 
Knox, then it was tied 16 to 16. The 
Knox team called a halt and had a 
heart to heart talk but when play 
was resumed it was all Lake Forest. 
With the score tied IS all again, 
Knox called another consultation, but 
the Red and Black could not be stop- 
ped, and Eddy finishing the scoring 
with a basket and free throw; final 
score being 23 to IS. The game was 
well fought and closely guarded thru- 
out; the entire Red and Black team 
fought hard and when the punch was 
needed, came back strong and deliv- 
ered the goods. Eddy and Mac led 
in the scoring, while Jack Rees and 
Schick guarded well. For Knox, 
Crabbe and Murphy featured; Hoover 
playing a good game at forward in 
the first half with a broken rib. 
Coach Mather was greatly encouraged 
in both games by the fact that in the 
second half of each game the team 
outplayed their opponents and show- 
ed they are in condition. 

Members of the team were enter- 
tained royally on Saturday by Knox 
men (and women) at the fraternity 
houses. 



LAKE FOREST 


B| P 


P 


T 


Eddy, r. f. 
Marsh, 1. f. 
McCormack, c. 
Schick, r. g. 
Rees, J., 1. g. 
MONMOUTH 


4 1 2 
3 1 
2 | 
1 
1 
B| F 


1 



1 



p 


1 
1 

1 
1 
T 


Lawrence, r. f. 
Holliday, 1. f. 
Axline, c. 
Berry, 1. g. 


5 1 3 
2 | 

1 

2 




2 
1 


1 
1 
1 




Cobb, r. g. 



Jen and Mary 

Pollyanna Corner 
Merry Sunshine Edition 



There is always something to be 
glad about ho matter how dreary 
things seem. Don't crab, don't frown, 
just smile! Behind the clouds there's 
a silver lining and after the blow you 
see the pretty stars — smile, smile, 
SMILE!!! 

For instance — our late publicity. 
Think of the free advertising we are 
getting — a quarter of a column more 
and we'll be known as the most suc- 
cessful matrimonial bureau on the 
north shore. And girls — you can al- 
ways pose in your own home town as 
one of the speedy ones who made the 
rules necessary. 



Aren't you glad it snowed? Now 
the new spring rules won't apply. 
Talk about "grasping spring by the 
throat" — I guess the weather man is 
on our side all right, all right. 



If this colyum doesn't seem very 
bright and sunny to you just be glad 
there isn't any more of it. That's 
our advice. 



Keep up the pace Flora, but don't 
get Tuckered out. 



Have you taken your day off yet 
to study the league of nations? Why 
not proclaim a holiday and all have 
a big time in the lib? 



Garrick Club Announces 
Pledges 

The Garrick Club announces the 
pledging on February the eighteenth 
of Elsie Engel, Lorraine Maclay, 
Myron Thayer, and Edwin Johnson 



LAKE FOREST 



| B| F| P T 



Eddy, 1. f. 
Maplesden, r. f. 
McCormack, c. 
Schick, r. g. 
Rees, J., 1. g. 
KNOX 



Hoover, r. f. 
Willsie, 1. f. 
Murphy, c. 
Crabbe, 1. g. 
Holmes, r. g. 
Welch, r. f. 
Whitenack, r. g. 



3 


2 





2 





2 





1 








F 


P 





1 





1 


2 


2 





3 





1 















Music School Notes 

Third Subscription Concert One of 
Best in Series 

Lake Forest music lovers were able 
to hear one of the foremost violin- 
ists of the day when Eddy Brown 
gave a concert in the Durand Art In- 
stitute on Saturday evening. 

Mr. Brown's playing was marked 
throughout by clarity and strength. 
His interpretations were sane and in- 
teresting. His tones were rich, full, 
warm, flowing, responsive to melody 
contour, rhythm, and modulation. 
Eddy Brown is evidently familiar with 
all the technical artifice and eccen- 
tricites of violin playing in which he 
was sympathetically seconded by his 
beautiful Stradivarious. 

A fair sized audience was present 
and the programme presented was en- 
thusiastically received. The follow- 
ing programme with a number of en- 
core numbers was presented. 
PROGRAMME 

Sonata (Devil's Trill) Tartini 

Concerto Comus 

Allegro molto 

Adagio 

Allegro subito 

Melodie Tschaikowsky 

Rondino Cramer-Brown 

Menuet Paderewsky 

La Ronde des Lutins Bazzini 

La Gitana Kreisler 

(Arabo Spanish Dance of the 
ISth Century) 

Serenade Espagnole Chaminade 

Witches Dance Paganini 

Mr. Max Terr at the Piano 



Daggett (aged 12) to Miss Milin- 
owski: 

"If "f" stands for forte, then I 
suppose "p" stands for twenty." 



Sunday afternoon tea at Lois Hall 
gave us the opportunity of happy in- 
tercouse with our college friends. 



Mrs. Wright and Mrs. Phillips in- 
vited the Music School to a valentine 
party on Friday afternoon. Candies 
with mottoes and fortunes in rhyme 
gave us startling glimpses of the fu- 
ture. The whole afternoon was one 
of the happiest of the year. 



Mr. A. F. Randolph, of Canton, 
Illinois, was the guest of his daugh- 
ter Ruth, over the week end. 



Dr. Salvatore Vella visited his sis- 
ter Maria at the Music School this 
last week. 



THE STENTOR 



111 



Don'ts for Fussers 

Don't go to Monahan's more than 
twice a week. If you must eat to- 
gether take it in a shoehox and eat 
it on the beach. Spring is coming 
anyway. 



Don't be seen starting off on a date 
together too often. Arrange a con- 
venient meeting place and fool 'em. 



Don't, by all means, be seen casting 
your eyes in each other's direction 
in chapel. Some prof, may inter- 
cept the gaze. 



Don't ask for too many special per- 
missions. You can's be expecting 
favors all the time. 



Don't plan on too many dances — you 
didn't come to college for a social 
season. If you do your studying 
properly you will need plenty of 
rest. 



Don't wear a fraternity pin unless you 
want all the notoriety that goes 
with it. It is a serious matter and 
should be considered carefully. 



Don't be seen walking together from 
chapel. It is liable to cause com- 
ment among the Faculty. 

Professor Sibley entertained at a 
delightful Bridge party on Friday 
evening, February 14th. The rooms 
were prettily decorated with flowers 
and he served delicious refreshments, 
as usual. The guests were Dr. and 
Mrs. Wright, Dr. and Mrs. Coffin, Dr. 
and Mrs. Allee, Miss Hamilton, Miss 
Powell, Professor McNeil, Mason 
Armstrong and Howard Woods. 



Helen Lockhard is still seriously ill 
at Alice Home. The entire college is 
hoping for her speedy recovery. 



Marjorie McCollum visited friends 
in Chicago last week end. 



Mildred Gerlach spent the week end 
with friends in Winnetka. 



Marion Preston visited friends in 
Oak Park last week. 



Garnette Higbee spent the week end 
with Gladys Reichert at her home in 
Chicago. 



Ruth 
from a 
Elgin. 



Kenyon returned Monday 
short visit at her home in 



Music School Gives 
First Recital 

Monday afternoon, February the 
seventeenth, the students of the Music 
School gave a concert in the Durand 
Art Institute, to which the college 
and the town were cordially invited. 
A very interesting program was ren- 
dered in which each partici- 
pant showed great skill in inter- 
preting the works of some of our 
greatest artists. The Music School is 
to be highly complimented on the suc- 
cess of this concert, and it is to be 
hoped that we may anticipate the 
pleasure of spending more pleasant 
afternoons listening to these prom- 
ising young people. The program 
follows: 

PROGRAM 

Prelude e Fugue Bach 

Mazurka, Op. 33 No. 2 Chopin 

Margaret Colton 

Slow Footed Night Neidlinger 

Hannah Withers 

Study, C Major Burgmusler 

Scytha Mark 

Six Variations Beethoven 

Alice Frazier 

Allegro Vivace (Violin 

Concerto) Mendelssohn 

Marion Cook 

Two Waltzes Brahms 

Lottchen Knaak 

Novelette, E Major Schumann 

Ruth Randolph 

Jean Burleigh 

Margaret Best 

Two Preludes in E Flat. . . L. Wright 

Marion Moehlanpah 

Souvenir Derda 

Orientale Cui 

Irvin Hirschy 

Gavotte Ornstein 

Melancholie 

Danse Negre Scott 

Dorothy Antrim 

Habanera Chabrier 

(Transcription for piano and 

harp by H. Renee) 
Helen Reichert, Vesta Votaw 

Prelude D. Flat Chopin 

Hazel Fellers 

Ah! Love but a day Protheroe 

Marion Cook 

Concert Study D Flat Liszt 

Helen Reichert 



Lillian Stephens spent the week end 
in Chicago with her parents. 



Discussion Club Or- 
ganized 

A new club has made its appear- 
ance in Lois Durand Hall. The pur- 
pose of the organization is the study 
and discussion of social problems. 
Regular meetings are held Wednes- 
day evenings. At present the club is 
studying Weyls' "New Democracy." 
There are twenty charter members 
and any other girl who is interested 
in the purpose of the club may be ad- 
mitted upon a three-fourths vote of 
the charter members. 




When tailored 

in the Jerrems way, 
adapted to a man's 
individuality, avoid- 
ing extreme fads, 
your clothes will 
continue in style un- 
til they have given 
a full measure of 
service. 

Suits and Overcoats 

Prices $40 to $75 




Three Stores: 

7 North La Salle St. 

314 S. Michigan Ave. 

7 1 E. Monroe St. 



112 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students ot Lake 
Forest College. 
Board of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '10. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Lawrence Maplesden, '21. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters: 

Sara Moore, '21. 

otis Chatfield-Taylor, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

Horace Horton, '21. 

Howard Wood, '22. 

Professor W. R. Bridgernan 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Subscription Rates : 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



THERE are times when even an 
editorial staff pauses to con- 
sider its aim in life. The ques- 
tion that first confronts us is, what 
is the purpose of any publication, and 
particularly, of our own publication? 
Next, does this purpose justify its 
existence; and then finally how near- 
ly are we coming to fulfilling the or- 
der we have made for ourselves? 

We can all easily agree that a 
newspaper or college paper must fur- 
nish news, and, particularly in the 
case of the latter, must furnish en- 
tertainment. This is all very good, 
but a paper founded on these prin- 
ciples alone is very apt to be as big 
a failure as some Chicago newspapers 
we have read. Public opinion is 
molded, whether consciously or un- 
consciously, it matters not, by the 
press. Therefore, we have an obli- 
gation to fulfil. More than this, a 
town or college paper reflects the 
spirit and morale of that particular 
town or college. They are barom 
eters, so to speak, of the atmosphere 
within. 

Now for an inventory of our par- 
ticular little sheet. We do make an 
effort to put into print every bit of 
news which comes within our reach. 
As for entertainment, people have 



appear very much interested when 
reading the Stentor. So far, so good, 
but — ss for molding public opinion, 
just what can we show. To be sure, 
we have crabbed and criticized at 
length when the powers-that-be failed 
to follow out our pet plan of pro- 
cedure. A college paper could never 
survive without finding fault with the 
faculty. We cannot dispute this, but 
it is not our sole purpose in life. Just 
to side step a moment at this point, 
we might suggest an alternative for 
this often unsuccessful method. A 
committee, self-appointed or other- 
wise, calling upon a representative of 
the faculty and presenting its case in 
a sane and reasonable manner, might 
be more effective in accomplishing re- 
sults. 

Finally, does our paper reflect fair- 
ly and accurately the spirit and ex- 
pression of the whole student body? 
If it borders too nearly on the trivial 
and rude, should we be satisfied, even 
though we try to justify it in our ef- 
fort to be entertaining? Every stu- 
dent, we hope, is jealous of the good 
reputation of L. F. and should be 
willing to contribute material to his 
college paper which will preserve this 
reputation. 

As usual, when "weighed in the 
balance", we find ourselves sadly 
wanting, but we mean to make a 
greater effort in the future. One 
thing is necessary and that is more 
faithful contributions from the stu- 
dent body in general as well as from 
our recognized reporters. The more 
people who participate in this work, 
the better paper we can have, and the 
greater will be the interest in it. 
Now for a real Stentor! 



Five or six exams crowded into three 
days gives little opportunity for any 
systematic review. Then why not set 
aside the usual week for examin- 
ations? 



UARTERLY Exams are about 
a month distant. Presumably 
they will come immediately be- 
fore Spring vacation. Last quarter 
they were crowded in the three days 
preceding the Christmas recess. A 
three day examination schedule 
means that a great many people will 
have three or even four exams on the 
same day. In years gone by it was 
considered impossible to have more 
than two on one day. The exams 
now are every bit as stiff as they were 
then. It is safe to say that neither 
the students nor the members of the 
faculty particularly enjoy an exam 
that lasts until 5:30 on the evening 
preceding vacation. Examinations 
are usually considered valuable be- 
cause of the opportunity they afford 



for a chance to review and organize 
been known to smile, laugh, and even J the work done during the quarter. 



The Death of Dr. 
Chapman, '79 

In accord with his reputation, wide 
publicity has been given to the death 
of Dr. Chapman and most of our read- 
ers have seen some account of his 
life and activities. It is remarkable 
that two of the three members of the 
first class graduated at Lake Forest, 
Dr. Chapman and B. Fay Mills, should 
have been among the first four of the 
best-known and most successful 
evangelists of the last forty years. 
Dr. Chapman came here with Dr. 
Gregory, when the latter became 
President, and therefore was here but 
one year before his graduation. From 
here he went to Lane Seminary, being 
graduated there in 1882, and from 
the Seminary was called to a church 
in Albany, N. Y., and later to Bethany 
Church, Philadelphia, where he re- 
mained until 1893. What follows is 
taken mainly from the notice of his 
death in the Continent: 

"Resigning from the Bethany pul- 
put in 1893, Dr. Chapman undertook 
his first evangelistic work, holding 
meetings in all parts of the United 
States for three years. Returning to 
Philadelphia he again became pastor 
of Bethany, remaining there until 
called to New York city. In Fourth 
Avenue church he served with great 
success, but the evangelistic call was 
too strong, and five years later he re- 
signed and definitely entered the 
evangelistic field. As an evangelist 
he is known to hundreds of thousands 
throughout the world, and assisted by 
Charles M. Alexander, the famous 
song leader, he has conducted revivals 
in all the great cities of the country. 
In 19 03 he was made executive secre- 
tary of Assembly's commission on 
evangelistic work, and later became 
representative at large for the com- 
mission. He was closely associated 
with Billy Sunday, and aften said that 
he gave Mr. Sunday his first sermon. 
Dr. Chapman made two tours of the 
world in the interest of evangelism, 
spending much time in Australia on 
the second trip, and in 1917 he was 
elected moderator of General Assem- 
bly. He was also the founder of the 
Pocket Testament League. Since the 
start of the New Era Movement, he 
has devoted practically all his time to 



THE STENTOR 



113 



that effort, making his headquarters 
in the Presbyterian building. Dr. 
Chapman was married three times, 
and besides his widow, is survived by 
two sons, Captain J. Wilbur Chapman, 
Jr., now in France, and A. Hamilton 
Chapman, a student at "Williams Col- 
lege, and two daughters, Mrs. Bertha 
I. Goodson and Mrs. Fred E. Linder." 

Two funeral services were held on 
Sunday, Dec. 29. The first was at 
Fourth Church, New York City, where 
he had been pastor in former days. 
This service was in recognition of his 
private life and pastoral work. The 
second service was in recognition of 
Dr. Chapman's public life, and was 
held in Fifth Avenue church. This 
service was the honor paid by the 
Presbyterian Church to one of its 
most eminent members and a former 
moderator, and among those partici- 
pating were Vice President Thomas 
R. Marshall, Dr. William H. Roberts, 
stated clerk of General Assembly; Dr. 
John F. Carson, former moderator of 
Assembly; Dr. Harlan G. Mendenhall, 
moderator of presbytery; Dr. William 
Hiram Foulkes, general secretary of 
the New Era Movement; Rev. Andrew 
Magill, pastor at Jamaica, L. I., Dr. 
Chapman's home, and Commander 
Evangeline Booth of the Salvation 
Army. 

Dr. Chapman received the degree 
of D. D. from Wooster in 1898 and of 
LL. D. from Heidelberg (Ohio) in 
1910. 



Alumni Notes 

1SS9. Rev. Edgar P. Hill, D. D., re- 
cently of McCormick Seminary, has 
removed to New York City to take 
the secretaryship of the General 
Board of Education of the Presby- 
terian Church. 

1S99. M. A. Rev. S. S. Hilscher was 
installed on December 12th as pastor 
of the Second Presbyterian Church of 
Lincoln, Nebr. 

1906. Mrs. W. C. (Nettie Betten) 
Hunter has recently been appointed 
Dean of Women at Geneva College, 
Beaver Falls, Pa., where her husband 
is Professor of History and Econom- 
ics. 

1907. Miss Bertha Sturdevant is a 
teacher in the high school at Beaver, 
Pa. 

1917. Paul H. Fuller enlisted May, 
1917, and was commissioned in the 
Autumn of 1918 at Camp Hancock, 
a machine gun training center. He 
is now discharged and expecting to 
enter a college in California. His ad- 
dress is Denver, Colo. 1543 Wash- 
ington St. 

1917. The papers of Feb. 12 an- 
nounce that the director of military 
aeronautics had recommended ad- 
vanced flying ratings for some twen- 
ty aviators on the basis of distinguish- 



ed service in action overseas. Among 
these is Edward Orr, who lost his life 
by accident Sept. 14, but was cited 
for extraordinary heroism in a com- 
bat on August 28. 

Glenn Stokes, ex. '17, is now prin- 
cipal of the Altoona High School. 
Rip drove into Galesburg Saturday in 
his new limousine (Ford). 

Charles Chapman, ex '19, is now 
attending Knox. Charley says that 
Lombard is after him now. 



That Cartoon! 



By the way, have you noticed that 
by turning the picture on the front 
page up-side-down another series of 
portraits is revealed? A long file of 
men may be noticed; each seems to 
have three bright, shining quarters 
grasped in his right hand. L. Maples- 
den is busily engaged in receiving 
these quarters. A few inches toward 
the center he may be observed carry- 
ing a heavy bag of shekels to the 
B. M. of the Stentor. Still farther 
over the Editorial Staff is seen de- 
parting for Europe on a brief va- 
cation — all expenses paid by the Sten- 
tor profits. 





a 



The Original 

ble Sykes" 



DIAMOND MEDAL -:- ARTIST -:- PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 

140 North State Street 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts.) 

Established at present location since 1906 
MAKER OF HY-CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 
Phone Central 5341 





114 



THE STBNTOR 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



UsTBOWMAN'S safe MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milK bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 1Q1-1C9 Vine Ave 



Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TR1EBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 1 7 Lake Forest, 



111. 




The daily use ol 

KOSMEO CREAM 

ana 

KOSMEO POWDER 

and a weeklu visit to 

Mrs. Graham s 
Beautvj Shop 

1432 Stevens Bldg. 

will create a perfect 

complexion. 

TRY IT. 



Dr. Nollen is Mentioned 
in Secretary's Report 

The following extracts from the 
report of Secretary Ruddell on Y. 
M. C. A. Service with the Fourth Ital- 
ian Army have been clipped from the 
Princeton Packet. 

"Now I should like to describe to 
you, as nearly as I can remember, 
the Posto di Ristoro work of the 'Y' 
on the Grappa. I could fill a book 
with the details of this work, but 
will give you some of the most im- 
portant facts called to mind. Feel- 
ing that you will pardon all the big 
T's' in it, I will describe it as 
I saw it and remember it. My first 
night in my two-by-four bedroom 
over my 'casa' I heard groans 
through the night and soldiers bring- 
ing in sick and wounded. The next 
day, upon investigation, I found the 
other end of the top of our casa 
was used as a first aid dressing sta- 
tion and a receiving station for the 
sick. From here they were put on 
the teleferica, forty feet away, and 
sent down the mountain in half the 
time of the American ambulance. 
What to do for these poor fellows 
at that time was a study, because I 
had no supplies for this particular 
work. A bucket of hot lemonade 
brought happiness, but, unfortu- 
nately, I could secure no more 
lemons and sugar; but I made a point 
to spend a little time with each batch, 
shaking hands, kidding, rolling cigar- 
ettes for them, giving them water, 
and helping kill time waiting for the 
trip down the mountain. A last pat 
on the cheek and a hand shake and 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Established IS71 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 
73-75 W. South Water Street 

Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



C. T. Gunn Co. 



Gro 



cers 



Agency Huyler's Candies 

Curtice Bros. Goods LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 
O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



KUBELSKY dSTO^ 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



115 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 



Dr. G. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



£JLASS Pins and Rings. 
^"^^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 
SPEIS BROS 



27 E. MONROE S 

CHICAGO 

II 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 
y> For Light 

i T /lt C For Heat 

V^t^O ForPower 

North Shore Gas Co. 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusioe 
Dry Goods Store 




a 'Buona fortuna' before their trip 
down and possibly, without the reg- 
ular 'posto' supplies, the 'Y' was 
helping these noble boys and creat- 
ing a warmth of spirit between 
America and Italy in these cases that 
might exist for ever. At this time, 
however, there was on an average 
about twenty to twenty-five of these 
cases a day and the same at night. 
About October 18, on account of the 
shelling getting heavier (and nearer), 
they moved this dressing station to a 
small building two doors away from 
the entrance to the tunnel, about 300 
feet from our casa; and although the 
building itself was exposed, it had 
more protection from the mountain 
and the operating-room was cut into 
the solid rock on the inside, giving 
at least protection to the patients 
and medical officers during the oper- 
ation. This little cave was about ten 
by twenty feet, dark but for one lan- 
tern, and walls and ceilings were 
dripping generally from moisture. 

"The first real Posto di Ristoro I 
established in this building, starting 
with chocolate and cigarettes. The 
money for these cigarettes was 
raised at a bazaar at Lake Minne- 
tonka, run by the Misses Anna and 
Emeline Nollen, 5485 Cornell Ave., 
Chicago, Illinois, daughters of our 
Director-General, Dr. J. S. Nollen, 
and the Misses Katherlne and Helen 
Ewing, Lake Forest, Illinois. I 
wrote to all four of the young ladies 
in question, thanking them in the 
name of the Italian soldiers and the 
American Ambulance boys. 

"I wish to thank Dr. Silliman, Mr. 
Peffers, and the others who came up 
to see me; their visits were very 
cheering. Also, I should like to thank 
you, Dr. Nollen, for your several 
visits, and would say that you are 
rather careless concerning shells." 



Dry Goods 



_yfSfiopfor 

^Womens&Childrens Furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



Lillian Evans visited Delia Bab- 
cock, ex '19, at her home in Chicago 
last week end. 



Lydia Sprecher has returned from 
a short visit with her grandmother at 
Mount Morris, Illinois. 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

EXPR ESSM AN 

Special Attention Given to Students 

TELEPHONE j Residence 675 
NUMBERS i Office 384 



Spalding Ice Skates 




For Every Member of the Family 

Toboggans, Slcis, Snowshocr, 

Hockey Supplies, £.iz. 

Catalorjite on rctjut s£. 

A. G. SPALDING & EROS. 

211-217 So. State Street, Chicago. HI. 



TheV^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 
/. B. Veselsf\y 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Ffuilding 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision 'Dealers 



Grocery 



Market 



807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 
Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



%!7d- 00 takes beautiful new 

*V' ' * $250.00 mahogany finish 

phonograph and records. Never used. 
60 inches high. Latest design. Will ship 
C. O. D. on approval. 

Mrs. Waverly Brown 
317 Greenleaf Ave., Wilmette, Illinois 



116 



THE STENTOR 




LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C, the college work for the rest of the 
year will be reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters will be 

continued for this year; consequently the second term will open on Tuesday, Jan. 7. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1868. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, IU. 



■mm 



j'iiiii;;:;; 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue, LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 



C.G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning ■ Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 

Cleaning and Pressing . . 51.50 

Pressing ... . . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 

WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 




AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m> 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ana 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hu sse y & Co. 

Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, February 28, 1919. 



NUMBER 16. 



Memorial Services 
Held in Ghapel 

L. F. C. HONORS ITS 
GOLD STAR MEN 

On Friday, February 21st, an ap- 
propriate and impressive service was 
•held in Chapel in memory of Lake 
Foresters who gave their lives in na- 
tional service. The service flag has 
recently been revised and was hung 
for the occasion. In the center are 
five gold stars and there are now 158 
blue stars in all. 

Professor Sibley spoke about the 
gold stars and the men in whose 
memory they are dedicated. They 
are: — 

John A. Linn, '93, was in the ser- 
vice of the Y.M.C.A. and was killed 
by shell fire on the 8th of October, 
1918. 

Earl D. Milroy, '14, of Oneida, 111., 
died February 4th. 1918, at Camp 
Quantico, Va. 

Earl G. Adams, '17-ex. Oregon, 111., 
died at Camp Doniphan, December 
30th, 1917. 

Lieut. Edward Orr was killed in an 
accident in France September 4th, 
1918. A short time previous to his 
death, Lieut. Orr was awarded the 
distinguished service cross. 

Walter W. Willert, '17, died of 
wounds on July IS, 1918. 

The memory of Walter Willert is 
still fresh in the minds of the greater 
part of the student body, and the 
sincere words of tribute paid him by 
Mr. Sibley were very much appre- 
ciated. 

The service was concluded with a 
speech by Mr. Clarence W. Diver, '0'5 
of Waukegan, Illinois. He empha- 
sized especially the need of intelli- 
gent men and women in the present 
critical period of our country and the 
rest of the world, as well as the fact 
that the colleges and universities 
must play a leading part in the spirit 
of unselfish service. 



Red and 
Out to Beat 
Northwestern 

THREE MORE VICTORIES WILL 

MAKE L. F. CHAMPIONS OF 

LITTLE FIVE 

After a week's rest the basketball 
team goes to Naperville Saturday to 
play Northwestern College. Although 
out of the running, the doughty dutch- 
men are out to break up any pennant 
contender's prospects. In previous 
contests Lake Forest and Northwes- 
tern have always had close contests, 
and since the football game in the 
fall of 1917 on Farwell field, the Red 
and Black are hot after revenge. The 
team has three conference games re- 
maining and if they win these, the 
championship of the Little Five will 
belong to the Red and Black. Coach 
Mather's gang are in excellent shape 
with the exception of Marsh and 
Maplesden, and they are confident of 
coming home with the bacon tomor- 
row. So fur-the-luv-of-Mike let's 
wake up and let them know we are 
backing them! 



Hazel Sequin has returned after 
.speeding several days at Madison. 



Mr. H. C. Durand 

Addresses Y. M. C. A. 

The largest and probably the most 
successful Y.M.C.A. meeting of th»~ 
year was held Wednesday evening at 
the Calvin Durand Commons. 

The feature of the meeting was the 
splendid talk given the men by Mr. 
H. C. Durand, Lake Forest's leading 
citizen, and a man who holds the col- 
lege interests close to his heart. His 
words were those of encouragement 
to the men, and he especially urged 
them to make the best possible of 
their time spent here; citing facts 
that showed the world to be looking 
always for the educated man. Mr. 
Durand is a very interesting talker, 
and his words of. advice were greatly 
appreciated by all who heard him. 

On next Wednesday evening the 
Y.M.C.A. will meet in the Kappa Sig- 
ma rooms in Harlan Hall. All men 



Kappa Sigma Gives 
Annual iB an quel 

Last Saturday evening at six-thirty 
o'clock the Kappa Sigs gave their an- 
nual banquet to the members of the 
faculty and a few outside quests. A 
long table was spread across the 
length of the two fraternity rooms, 
and there were at each end short 
tables, perpendicular to the long one. 
Oyster cocktail, turkey, dressing, 
mashed potatoes, salad, French pas- 
try, and coffee were the main items 
on- the menu. After the meal cigars 
and cigarettes were passed. Vernon 
Downs occupied the toastmaster's 
chair. Attorney Clarence Diver of 
Waukegan, an alumni of Lake Forest, 
and a member of the fraternity, gave 
the principal address of the evening. 
Each of the faculty members was 
called upon to talk, and many fine 
speeches were made. 

Mr. Henry Smith, former manager 
of the Blackler Market, who is soon 
to leave Lake Forest, was the guest 
of honor. He was presented with a 
mahogany humidor stand by the 
members of Kappa Sigma, to whom, 
in years past, he has always been a 
sincere friend. 

After the toasts were finished, the 
tables were quickly cleared away and 
a card session was started. Professor 
Sibley and Mr. Diver, according to 
their custom, challenged anyone to 
play Five -Hundred. 

About twelve o'clock the guests left 
after having spent a very enjoyable 
evening. Among those present from 
out of town were Joseph B. Combs, 
Chicago, Ernest Smith, Chicago, and 
Clarence Diver, Waukegan. 



Word has been received that Dr. 
Nollen will probably return to the 
United States for a short visit some- 
time in May. 



of the college are especially urged to 
be present at this meeting, as mat- 
ters of important business will be 
taken up at that time. 



US 



THE STENTOR 



From Me to You 

Friend Sal: 

Well Sal, I aint wrote you for 
quite some time, because I thought 
whats the use anyhow when you can 
read everything what might be going 
on in this neck of the woods in places 
like the World's Straightest News- 
paper. But you know Sal we aint 
figgered on the front page for three 
days now so I thought maybe you'd 
like to know how we was gettin on. 
You see its like this Sal, all the girls 
is engaged now so then aint nothin 
excitin left to happen, and there's 
a trespass sign been put out on the 
Point so nobody will get caught there 
no more, so whats the use of any 
more of them reporters eomin a- 
round. 

But Sal even if there wasn't nothin 
more to happen I don't guess it 
would happen anyhow. Do you know 
it looks like everybody around these 
parts had got converted or some- 
thing. Nobody never goes out with 
nobody any more and you never see 
a man hangin around this here hall. 
In fact things is so quiet that the 
Dean is even off on a vacation and 
nobody acts like they knew the dif- 
ference. Just give the rest of this 
paper a slant and see if you don't 
notice the change. Why Sal when 
the girls aint going to missionary meet- 
ings or on educational sprees they 
are spending their evenings at fire- 
side parties and such cheerful like 
amusements. And the men, why Sal, 
they write us such nice solemn edi- 
torials on how we should treat each 
other and the faculty and nobody says 
nothing mean about nobody else 
that this place seems almost as peace- 
ful as Ireland or Russia or some other 
of them African countries. Even 
Jen and Mary has took to reading 
something besides Snappy Stories and 
you know Sal thats goin some for 
them dames. 

Well Sal if this reformation busts 
up I may write you again but if 
things keep on so peaceable there 
wont be nothin to write about, so 
don't worry none if you don't here. 

Jill 



Jen and Mary 

Well, good-bye Fat, good luck to 
you! But don't leave any more brok- 
en hearted, helpless, little colleges be- 
hind you, will ya Eddie? — Adios. 



It's nearing time for eggsams — 
but don't let that trouble your brain 
— it might incapacitate you for fur- 
ther enjoyment of the beauties of na- 
ture. Just follow the simple advice 
of one who knows and cultivate the 
right friends. By a little patience and 
forethought in winning your way in- 
to the heart of every shark, by care- 
ful study of the art of camouflage in 
cribbing and by elicitating the trust 
and faith of all the profs, you ought 
to get by — if you have good luck. 



"How do you rate this stuff, 
Jupiter?" 

(Found on the steps of a barber 
shop.) 



When I consider how my dough is 

spent 
Ere half my bills in this darn world 

are met, 
And that one flapper whom I can't 

forget 
Will cut me dead unless my will is 

bent 
To serve her with my shekels — I 

lament 
The bank account, now vanished 

quite, and fret, 
Does she expect the movies e'en in 

debt? 
I fondly ask, "Say guys — who'll lend 

a cent?" 



Ernest Smith of Chicago, Clarence 
Diver of Waukegan, Ensign Wilmar 
Pearce, Charles Beard, George Beard, 
Joseph Coambs of Chicago, Donald 
Carr, and Ensign Brandt were callers 
at the Kappa Sigma house last week. 



With high hopes for its great popu- 
larity we formally present a sample 
of our life's masterpiece — 

A Calendar for Young Ladies 
Sunday: 

Let thine eyes look right on, and 

let thine eyelids look before thee. 
Monday: 

Reprove not a steady, lest he drop 

thee, rebuke a new catch and he 

will love thee. 
Tuesday : 

He that wlnketh with the eye caus- 

eth heart beats; but a prating fool 

shall fall. 
Wednesday : 

The foolishness pf man perverteth 

his way; and his heart faileth 

against a glance. 
Thursday : 

As ye flirt — so shall ye date. 
Friday: 

Be not yet dismayed — lift up thine 

eyes and speak again. 



L. F. Sends Delegates to 
National Conference 

The National Student's Conference 
of the Y.W.C.A. was held at Evans- 
ton last week beginning Thursday 
evening and ending Sunday after- 
noon. 

The purpose of this conference was 
to give new ideas to the delegates 
from the different colleges and uni- 
versities that they in turn might take 
them back to the girls who weren't 
so fortunate as to attend the confer- 
ence. In this way it is hoped that 
the college women all over the coun- 
try can be awakened sufficiently to 
realize just how important a place 
they hold in the world in this age, 
and how they can help in the New 
World Movement. Two hundred 
schools were represented by two 
hundred and nine students. There 
were also many secretaries and speak- 
ers which made above four hundred 
and five who shared this big treat. 

The speakers were excellent and 
well known in the outside world. 
They told about their personal ex- 
periences with the foreign born 
women, the colored people, the in- 
dustrial women and their relation to 
the war, women and the New World. 
They emphasized the idea which is 
with us now of the New World and 
our necessary part in it. Women are 
filling a much more important place 
in this world today than they ever 
have before. They need competent 
leaders and it is up to the college 
women — there are only two per cent 
of the women who are college women 
— with the right training to lead the 
less fortunate ones. So it is almost 
a duty of the C. W. to get the most out 
of each day so she can put that much 
more into real living. But coming 
back to the conference again every 
girl should attend such a conference 
not only for the valuable ideas which 
one can get but for the great reli- 
gious experience. 

The delegates who were chosen to 
represent Lake Forest were Mildred 
Gerlach, Sarah Fisher, and Margaret 
Horton. 



Saturday: 

Blessed are ye, when men shall kid 
you, and walk with you, and swear 
all manner of vows to you falsely, 
for love's sake. 

Rejoice and be exceeding glad, for 
great is your reward in dates: for 
so kidded they your mothers which 
were before you. 



THE STENTOR 



119 



Tom, Dick, and Harry 

Attention, Everybody! Here's your 
column! This is just what you've all 
been looking for — a column where 
you can all expect to see your names 
in print at some time or other. Don't 
crab if what is said is not true, but 
be glad of the free publicity. This 
column should have many admirers 
and staunch friends for you don't 
have to do something spectacular in 
order to make it. Neither do you 
have to be an especial friend — or 
enemy of one of the Stentor Eds. So 
watch to see yourself featured and 
remember that this line is the Peo- 
ple's Friend. We treat everyone 
alike, and give everyone a square 
deal. Watch us! 

We figure that the worthy Dean of 
Women should have a bit of well de- 
served publicity. To have gone away 
and left us "on our own" for a whole 
week must have been somewhat of a 
mental strain for her so we commend 
her on her heroic act and award her 
the place of honor in our little Hall 
of Fame. 

To further the cause of little Dan- 
ny — oh shucks, we don't have to 
print his last name, do we? — well, 
anyhow to further little Danny's 
cause the Stentor Editors will do a 
little sleuthing on the side next week 
and will award the crocheted bicycle 
rack to the most promising couple. 
Keep your eye on the column. The 
evidence may point to you. 

We might as well tell you now that 
we're perfectly impartial, so if you've 
long cherished a secret desire to see 
your name in print don't hesitate to 
send us an anonymous letter and we 
will see that you get treated fair. In 
the due course of time you may ex- 
pect to see results. 

In conclusion may we add that a 
column cannot be a success unless 
it has the hearty support and co- 
operation of all its readers. This is 
your column. Make it your own — 
feel at home to ask us anything, for 
you're sure of publicity here. If you 
have anything for sale or what have 
you, any advice you would like con- 
cerning love affairs, or the time ap- 
pointed for the return of your sweet- 
heart's regiment from France, just ask 
us! — ask us! Wake us up, any time. 



The Y. W. Cozy 

Tuesday night when a nine o'clock 
bell rang in Lois Hall figures could be 
seen hurrying down stairs to the big 
room, each one carrying a pillow. 
One might almost have thought it a 
fire drill but for the hilarity. 

There was a roaring fire in the Big 
Room, something that is exceptional 
and cheerful, and soon every one was 
sitting comfortably before it. It was 
a real party for soon the freshmen 
appeared bringing ice cream with hot 
fudge sauce on it. While this was 
being eaten Lois Ryno told us some 
facts about the Y.W.C.A. which had 
been discussed at the meetings at 
Northwestern last week. Every one 
was much interested to learn just 
when and how the Y.W. had been 
founded and other important facts 
about it. 

After this Sara Fisher struck up 
some tunes on her mandolin find 
every one sang lustily. It was some 
evening and every one enjoyed it im- 
mensely. Let's have some more 
Y.W.! 



Seniors Elect Officers 

The ship of state of the class of 
1919 is no longer in danger of run- 
ning amuck. Last Monday that aug- 
ust body held a solemn class meet- 
ing at which the following officers 
were selected: 

President — Jack Rees 
Vice-President — Gwendolyn Massey 
Secretary — Margaret Horton 
Treasurer — Robert Burchell 



Rosemary Hume was the guest of 
Virginia Wales over the week end. 
She attended mid-winter at the Acad- 
emy. 



Zelma and Irene Farwell enter- 
tained their brother James last week. 



Margaret Mills spent several days 
at home in Chicago this week. 



Lillian Stephens visited her parents 
over the week end. 



Academy Mid-Winter 

Although the Lake Forest College 
students were not invited to enjoy all 
of the Academy's Mid-Winter festiv- 
ities, they were glad to be witnesses 
of the fast and furious game between 
Deerfield and Lake Forest Academy 
last Saturday A. M. The teams seem- 
ed evenly matched and both put up a 
good fight. There was lots of "pep" 
and excitement until the very last 
when Lake Forest Academy came out 
ahead with a score of 2 7 and Deer- 
field a score of 22. 

On Saturday afternoon the Gar- 
goyle Club presented "A Pair of 
Green Stockings" to an appreciative 
audience in the Durand Art Institute. 

Mid-winter Dance on Saturday 
night was a hugh success. The dance 
began at seven thirty, and Harvey's 
orchestra, good eats and pretty girls 
combined to make it one of the most 
enjoyable of the Academy's annual 
festivities. 



Mason G. Armstrong spent Sunday 
evening in Chicago and at Great 
Lakes Station. 



Joseph Black and Frederick R. 
Kelley spent Sunday and Monday at 
Black's home in Gary, Indiana. 




When tailored 

in the Jerrems way, 
adapted to a man's 
individuality, avoid- 
ing extreme fads, 
your clothes will 
continue in style un- 
til they have given 
a full measure of 
service. 

Suits and Overcoats 
Prices $40 to $75 



Three Stores: 

7 North La Salle St. 

314 S. Michigan Ave. 

7 1 E. Monroe St. 



120 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 
Hoard of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '10. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '10. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Lawrence Maplesden, '21. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 

Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 
Paul Offenheiser, '21. 
Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 
Horace Horton, '20. 
Howard Wood, '22. 
Professor W. R. Bridgeman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffiee of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



DO you ever meditate on the good 
points and fine qualities of those 
about you and with whom your 
fortunes are cast? The occupation is 
productive of much quiet happiness 
to yourself as well as of good to 
those on whom your attention Is ex- 
ercised. 

Nothing rejoices the mind like the 
contemplation of virtue, and you can- 
not be indifferent to one who has af- 
forded you that pleasure. Moreover, 
to contemplate the good gifts and 
faculties of another, you must first 
have the desire to seek and the will- 
ingness to appreciate them. The 
great heroes of these and of other 
times furnish ready-made examples of 
virtue, which leave nothing for you 
to do but join in the general ac- 
clamation of wonder and approval 
Such an one is brave, steadfast or 
skilful — you would travel some dis- 
tance to see him. Another is wise— you 
would hear him speak. This is sec 
ond-hand contemplation of virtue, but 
it is thrilling at that! You accord 
hero worship to a soldier, a politician, 
a philosopher, whose performances on 
the battle field, in the offices of states- 
manship or in the world of letters 
have brought him into world re- 
nown, and the very fact that he is 
known to have these virtues and ac- 



complishments, inspires your ap- 
plause. If then you can so" readily 
admire virtue in those whom you 
have never seen, how much more 
profitable to seek and recognize it 
near at hand. We all have virtues 
and vices, great or small as they may 
be, and even this college publication 
has its virtues, so why not recognize 
them? You would then have all the 
advantage which a knowledge of the 
trials and obstacles overcome and the 
bearing of immediate circumstances 
could command. 

The direct benefit of this daily 
practice will be your altered man- 
ner toward those under your con- 
sideration. For -you cannot contem- 
plate a person's virtues separately 
and distinctly, acknowledging them 
to yourself, without an increase of 
respect for them. You must treat 
such an one according to his deserts. 
To a kind person you will return 
kindness, to a just person justice and 
be as generous as you can toward the 
one in whom you have 'remarked 
particular generosity. Also you are 
bound to betray something of that 
new admiration you have for his es- 
pecial virtue, and he will not long 
be unconscious of your appreciation. 

Search the students, professors, and 
in fact everything about you (includ- 
ing the Stentor) until you find at 
least one solitary virtue. When you 
have found it at last and its posses- 
sor has become aware of your dis- 
covery, see if that former arrogance 
does not dwindle away. In other 
words, let us have more of a spirit 
of consistent co-operation on the cam- 
pus; for the good of the Stentor, the 
college, as well as each and every 
member of the college community. 

Philosophy Club Meets 

The second meeting of the Philo- 
sophy club was held Wednesday 
evening, February 19th, at the Kap- 
pa Sigma rooms in Harlan Hall. 
The subject of the evening was "War 
and Religion." Dr. Wright opened 
the discussion and later several mem- 
bers of the club added their bit. The 
discussion did not hold exactly to 
the subject — everything from . the 
"Ouija Board" to the value of the 
Y.M.C.A. in the war was discussed. 
Everyone was benefited, however, by 
the meeting. At the close of the dis- 
cussion the members of the club en- 
joyed some delicious refreshments 
which were served by the Kappa Sig- 
ma members of the club. The next 
meeting will be held at Lois Durand 
Hall, the subject being "Spiritual- 
ism." 



A Frosk Speaks 
Its Mind 

Everything is constantly changing 
in this world. Nothing stands still. 
So far so good. Now to get down to 
facts. Are you progressive? In other 
words, are you loyal? To answer this 
a definition of the term "loyalty" is 
necessary. Webster defines it as hav- 
ing a "faithful allegiance to one's 
soverign or country," but in a broad- 
er sense we see that it means being 
faithful to one's immediate surround- 
ings. 

At a first glance I presume you 
would answer, "of course I am loyal" 
and repeat the allegiance to your flag 
in all the bliss of ignorance. But 
think a moment! Are you faithful to 
your surroundings? Are you loyal 
to your college? In order to be loyal 
to your college you must be faithful 
to your faculty. Constant harping on 
members of the faculty to fellow stu- 
dents, particularly when it comes 
from upper to lower classmen, neith- 
er Inspires a feeling of loyalty to the 
college nor respect for the "harper" 
in the mind of the other fellow. It 
lowers the standard of your college 
as well as your own moral position. 

Crabbing about your food and the 
furnishings of your rooms is posi- 
tively disgusting to everyone and 
particularly to new comers. Your 
best friends dislike it in you and les- 
sen their respect for you because of 
it. If you are dissatisfied with your 
faculty and if the dormitories don't 
suit you, don't crab about it. Go 
ahead and do something. Start in 
determined to make your college what 
it ought to be if it isn't that already. 

As a conclusion sum up these essen- 
tials to loyalty and answer the ques- 
tion for yourself. If you are an up- 
per classman stop your crabbing and 
begin using your influence to inspire 
i loyalty in the freshmen. If you are 
a freshman don't listen to the crab- 
bing of the upper classmen but begin 
now to set a standard of loyalty for 
the new classes to come. For after 
all your college is what you make it. 
Its reputation is your reputation; and 
the standard you set now will be the 
standard of your successors and will 
determine the position of your Alma 
Mater in the College world. 



The students and faculty of Lake 
Forest College extend their deepest 
sympathy to Gertrude Maclaren and 
her sisters in their sorrow. 



THE STENTOR 



121 



Girls are Guests at 
Missionary Dinner 

Friday evening — Feb. 21, Lucy 
Knox, Edith Wise, Kathryn Horton, 
Helen Hoyer, Josephine Martin and 
Lillian Evans attended a Rainbow 
Dinner given in the Italian room of 
the Stevens Building. It was an inter- 
denominational meeting of the north- 
west. There were many interesting 
speakers, who told about the work 
being accomplished, and that is still to 
be done. It was a most inspiring 
meeting. Miss Lockland, who spoke 
at Lois Durand Hall a few weeks ago, 
was one of the chief speakers of the 
evening. The girls were the guests of 
Miss Rumsey and Mrs. Crosby, and 
owe them heartfelt appreciation for 
giving them the opportunity to enjoy 
the evening. 

Mrs. A. C. Nichols and Miss Grace 
Lobdell of Chicago were in Lake 
Forest last Sunday visiting Arthur 
Nichols and Lucius Lobdell. 



Last Sunday afternoon Miss Hamil- 
ton and the girls of Lois Hall enter- 
tained informally at tea. Coffee and 
wafers were served by several of the 
Senior girls, after which a most de 
lightful social hour was spent. 



Music School Notes 

Our gym class visited the lake, 
It was an awe inspiring trip 
To see the waves come up and break. 
Our gym class visited the lake. 
Some went too near for their own 

sake; 
The waves around their feet did skip. 
Our gym class visited the lake, 
It was an awe inspiring trip. 



A Current Events Club has been or- 
ganized in the Music School with Miss 
Knaak as president and Vesta Votaw 
as vice-president and secretary. Spe- 
cial topics are assigned for each meet- 
ing. A general discussion follows 
these reports. We are interested in 
the Russian Question, the Peace Con- 
ference and the happenings in the 
musical and literary world. The club 
is proving very interesting and edu- 
cational. 



Virginia Beggs returned Tuesday 
after a short visit at her home in 
Ashland, Illinois. 



Francelia Smith and Miss Harris 
are spending the vacation at the La- 
Salle Hotel. 



Maria Vella returned Sunday after 
a visit with relatives in Chicago. 



Mrs. Oliver Votaw of Cedar, Iowa, 
is visiting her daughter Vesta. 



I think of him the whole day through, 
The handsome man I think I love. 
'Twould surprize him greatly if he 

knew 
I think of him the whole day through. 
I don't know what I'm going to do, 
Oh send me help down from above! 
I think of him the whole day through, 
The handsome man I think I love. 



Bill (running after a train) 
Jim: "Well, did you miss your train?" 
Bill: "No, I'm just chasing it out of 
the barn." 



Marjorie McCullun spent the week 
end at home in Aurora. 



Dorothy Antrim spent last week 
end with friends in the city. 



Charline Bivins visited friends in 
Rogers Park. 



STUDENTS desiring to work an 
hour or more a day can make 
wages of more than $ 1 .00 per hour 
selling "America's War for Hu- 
manity" and "Life of Roosevelt 
Send at once for free outfit 

F. B. DICKERSON CO., 
Detroit, Michigan 

enclosing 20c in stamps for mail- 
ing outfits. 




The Original 

"Mable Sykes" 

DIAMOND MEDAL -:- ARTIST -:- PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 

140 North State Street 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts.) 

Established at present location since 1906 
MAKER OF HY-CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 
Phone Central 5341 





122 



THE STENTOR 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



use BOWMAN^S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milK bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-1C9 Vine Ave 



The 
Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSER. Prop. 
Phone I 7 Lake Forest, 111- 




The daily use oi 

KOSMEO CREAM 

ana 

KOSMEO POWDER 

ana a weekkj visit to 

Mrs. Graham s 
Beautvj Shop 

1432 Stevens Bldg. 

will create a perlect 

complexion. 

TRY IT. 



Lieut. Kauffmau, '12 

Writes of Trip Through 

Germany 

(Through the kindness of his 
Mother, we are allowed to print por- 
tions of a most interesting journal- 
letter from Lieut. H. B. Kauffman. 
'12, written from Coblenz after a 
long trip back to the Argonne with a 
supply-train. At least one other in- 
stallment, describing his actual 
Christmas-day experience will fol- 
low.) 

"We're here at last, after six 
we.eks on the road, counting stop", 
and it looks like a winter's job, at 
least. Nobody knows anything de- 
finitely, per usual; one day the regi- 
ment or the whole third army is to 
be relieved, and the next there are 
rumors of Russia if Bolshevism gets 
worse. I feel pretty sure we'll be 
here until spring, probably until 
peace is signed at least. We don't 
know much of conditions in Berlin, 
you probably have more information 
than we, but there may be enough 
trouble there to affect us before it's 
over. 

"We were just figuring out, from 
Dombasle in the Argonne, whence we 
started north to Coblenz, it is just 
a little less than 200 miles. It seems 
months ago that we left Dombasle 
before daylight on that Sunday morn- 
ing, so much happened along the way. 
I wrote you shortly after we made 
Phalzel, five miles this side of Trier. 
We stayed there until the 14th, when 
the regiment was unexpectedly or- 
dered on here, by rail. The supply 
company was pretty much "ausge- 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Established 1871 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 
73-75 W. South Water Street 

Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



C. T. Gunn Co. 

Grocers 

Agency Huyler's Candies 

Curtice Bros. Goods LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Wh\)? 
Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 
O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



KUBELSKY £=T» 



rry Levin 



Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 

For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



123 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 



Dr. C. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

12:00 m. . 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



(^JLASS Pins and Rings. 

^-^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 

SPEIS BROS. 2 J £ TZTgI 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



Fop Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave. .Highland Park, 111. 



Illl 

/^y For Light 

§ T fl Q For Heat 
W W*J For Power 

North Shore Gas Co. 

Telephone 1071 

CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

EX.PRESSMA N 

Special Attention Given to Students ^ 

TELEPHONE / Residence 675 
NUMBERS i Office 384 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusioe 
Dry Goods Store 




Dry Goods 



^/fShopfor 
Womens kChildrens Furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



spielt", Capt. Parker, Coffey and 
Blaisdell are sick, so Chapman and I 
came on here and I took the seven 
best Pierce trucks and after loading 
the train started for Dun-sur-Meause, 
down in the Argonne, 25 miles this 
side of Dombasle, where we had left 
all our surplus baggage, extra cloth- 
ing, overseas boxes, officers' trunks, 
etc., on the hike through. A little 
over a hundred miles to go, and a 
hundred and seventy-five to return, 
with trucks hitting about 50%. I 
expected it to take six or seven days, 
and it took twelve, but we had a 
great trip, with very little bad luck 
until we struck snow up in the moun- 
tains between here and Trier. With 
the detail which had been left on 
guard at Dun I had about 30 men 
with me, and they were a game and 
cheerful lot. About a dozen were the 
old Maine men, and they are always 
corkers wherever you put them. We 
struck a different road going down, 
cut off to the right through Belgium, 
through Virton, Montmedy and Sten- 
ay, and then south to Dun. I tried 
to arrange it so the boys could have 
as much fun as possible out of the 
trip, and we stayed at Petange over 
night, both going and coming. Most 
of them had warm friends there, of 
course and everybody celebrated. 
When we parked our trucks in front 
of Schmidt's hotel (our favorite 
place) and were recognized, half the 
town turned out to welcome us back. 
I had the raw rations we had taken 
with us. a quarter of beef, and the 
rest in proportion, and Madame 
Schmidt cooked supper and breakfast 
for the crowd, gave half of them 
beds to boot, and wouldn't take a 
cent. So I left her five loaves of the 
precious white bread (to them) and 
a half bag of sugar, 50 pounds, and 
they were happy. Nobody can come 
up to the Luxembourgeois in hos- 
pitality to the Americans; they can 
never do enough. 

(To be Continued) 



Margaret Horton has as her guest 
Dorothy Griswold. 



^AFE„ qnjry 




S PA L D 1 IS, G 
BASE BALL EQUIPMENT 

Uniforms, Cap?, Belts, Stockings, Shoes, 

Lats, Ba^ Gloves, Masks, Etc. 

Catsloane on ieqc*st 

• . r. SPALDING & BROS. 
211-217 So. State St., Chicago, 111. 



The v^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 
/. B. Veselsfay 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision T)ealers 



Grocery 



Market 



807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 
Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



^74 00 takes beautiful new 

^ * $250.00 mahogany finish 

phonograph and records. Never used. 
60 inches high. Latest design. Will ship 
C. O. D. on approval. 

Mrs. Waverly Brown 

317 Greenisaf Ave., Wilmette, Illinois 



124 



THE STENTOR 



IIIIIIIIIIIB 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C, the college work for the rest of the 
year will be reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters will be 

continued for this year; consequently the second term will open on Tuesday, Jan. 7. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, 111. 



lima 



JENSEN &SUNDM ARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 



C.G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 

Cleaning and Pressing . . $1.50 

Pressing ... . . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



—J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 

Military IVatches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m- 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Oscar Pierson 

FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Go. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, March 7, 1919. 



NUMBER 17. 



Come Out To See 

Officer 666 

Tonight! 

The members and possible mem- 
bers of the Garrick Club will stage 
their second play of the year this 
evening. 

Officer 66 6 is a three act comedy 
just packed full with lively action 
and good fun, and from the time that 
the curtain goes up until it drops 
again at the end of the third act there 
isn't a dull minute. Come and see 
and you will agree with us! 

This play scored a big hit while it 
played in Chicago four or five years 
ago and it has been prophesied that 
another big success will be seen to- 
night. 

Each member of the cast has put 
his and her time, thought, and ef- 
fort into it and this, plus the good 
coaching from Mr. Troutman, insures 
a splendid production of the play. 

The scene opens with the Japanese 
butler — only this one happens to be 
a real Chinese butler — fixing up the 
room for the secret return of Glad- 
win. Gladwin, who has just seen the 
one-girl-in-all-the-world-for-him and 
has had his first real thrill as a con- 
sequence, discovers that a well-known 
picture crook named Wilson has been 
posing as Gladwin. This same crook 
has won the girl which Gladwin had 
made up his mind to win, so he de- 
cides to catch the crook Wilson, him- 
self. 

■ He gets the uniform of Officer 666 
and catches Wilson, also being lucky 
enough to get the girl he wants. 
This ends the play. 

Come early and avoid the rush — 
tickets are only fifty cents. 



L. F.Wins Northwestern Game 

Red and Black to Clash with Beloit Tomorrow 



In a knock about finish the "Whirl- 
ing Dervish" five from Lake Forest 
pulled out at the big end of an 18 
to 15 score, down at Northwestern 
College last Saturday. The game was 
characterized by Lewis-Stecher meth- 
ods all the way through largely due 
to poo» officiating. 

Northwestern started scoring early 
and had a lead on our boys the great- 
er part of the first half, but near the 
end of the period Captain Rees' out- 
fit seemed to solve their opponents' 
style of play and the half ended with 
the count 9 to 7 our favor. 

Determined to surpass their efforts 
of the first half. Northwestern came 
back with a rush and the game even- 
ed up, the two teams alternating in 
the lead by a point or two, up until 
the last few minutes of the game. 
About this time Northwestern started 
substituting, putting in among others, 
a lieutenant belonging, if shapes are 
any indication of occupation, to the 
balloon corps. In an attempt to go 
over the top he flattened out our 
friend "Sherwood" Eddy, all over the 
floor, to which indignity he answered 
by caging the free throw allotted by 
the lynx-eyed referee. This perform- 
ance followed by a cork screw shot 
from "Sheik Dervish." McCormack 
settled the hash of our opponents, the 



curtain descending on the funeral- 
march-end of an 18 to 15 score for 
Xaperville. 

Eddy was long on the scoring side 
of the sheet, getting five field goals 
and two free throws, the field goals 
ooming as the result of an arrange- 
ment whereby he was to receive a 
dinner at Monahan's for caging that 
number. He promptly got five and 
refused to throw any more. If the 
arrangement had been four baskets, 
we'd probably been playing yet. 

The boys fought hard and deserved 
victory, but we must have more than 
that demonstrated Saturday to defeat 
Beloit, so "Let's go! Wadda ya say?" 



Line up: 
LAKE FOREST 



Marsh, r. f. 
Eddy, 1. f. 
McCormack, c. 
Maplesden, 1. g. 
Rees, J., r. g. 

NORTHWESTERN 



i: 


F 


p 


•i 








5 


2 


1 


1 














1 








3 



Kraft, 1. f. 
Brown, r. f. 
Barney, c. 
Meuhl, r. g. 
Ritan, 1. g. 
Schneller, 1. 
Krell, r. f. 
Gransden, 1. 
Homison, r. 



%■ 



15 


F 


P 


2 


u 


3 


2 





1 


1 


1 




















1 





2 





1 























1 



T 

TJ 
1 

1 


T 

1 










Discussion Contests 

The annual Preliminary Discussion 
contests took place in chapel yester- 
day and today. On Thursday the sub- 
ject was "Bolshevism". Five speak- 
ers participated. On Friday "Amer- 
ica and the Press" was discussed by 
six contestants. A more detailed ac- 
count of the contest will appear next 
week. 



Miss Cheek Visits Y. W. C. A. 

The girls of the Lois Hall Y.W.C.A. I Miss Cheek said, it may have been a 
were much interested, last week, to I "hoss dyin" or a broken wagon wheel 
hear about opportunities for mission- that prevented these people going far- 
ther west. She also told how few 
educational opportunities these peo- 
ple have. The children, for the most 
part, are taught by eighth graders 
who themselves have been taught by 
eighth graders, and so on until the 
standard has become very low. Every 
one present was much interested and 
rather appalled to think that condi- 
tions such as these exist in the United 
States. Miss Cheek made several 
converts to her cause. 



ary work in the Kentucky Mountains. 
Miss Cheek, who spoke to the girls, is 
Miss Laughlin's successor, and being 
a native of Kentucky she has a wide 
knowledge of the country and of the 
work to be done. 

By the time the evening was over 
each one of the girls felt as if she 
would like to help boost these people 
from the ruts into which they have 
fallen. In many cases it is due to a 
mere happenstance that forced these 
people to stay in the mountains. As 



126 



THE STENTOR 



Jen and Mary 

SUNDAY NIGHT AT 8 P. M. 

• 

One of our newest records — an ex- 
act reproduction of sounds heard in 
the Lois Durand Reformatory. 

"Ohee — gurrls — come heeare— look 
there!" 

"Oh, Jacohine — the fire hose has 
fallen down, grab it!" 

"No Isaacette — give it me — I 
say — !" 

"Hook and ladder — policeman!" 

"Fire, fiyurr!" 

Many doors burst open and bloom- 
ing maidens trip forth and join the 
throng! 

"Girls I have a feeling that it is 
getting warm in the corner under the 
stairs — to the rescue!" 

"Yea bo — " leaning far o'er the 
banister "much sparking apparent!" 

"Common my men — do your duty!" 

"Hookunladdah! Hookunladdah! 
Clang Clang!" 

"Handsup! Surrender or I'll souse 
you!" 

"I surrender, I surrender, I sur- 
render all!" 

"Hookunladder! Hook un— Ow! 
The Ham! The Ham! Leave the 
bacon — we don't want it." 

Clump, clump — clump — denoting 
the tapping of ten pairs of five and a 
half double A's on the stairs — as their 
fair owners flop up the stair way. 

"Why what does this mean? I say, 
what can this noise mean — Sunday 
night! This must not happen again!" 

In timid tones from the only sur- 
vivor — the stalwart male, "But, er — 
isn't it nice for the girls to have pep 
like that." 

"Pep — pep, my dear young man, 
has a limit. And, speaking of crim- 
inals — I don't suppose you realize 
that you are thirteen and two-thirds 
minutes late in leaving this hall?" 

The curtain goes down on the un- 
happy pair. 



I JIG ROBBERY! 

MUCH TIN WEAR STOLEN! 
R. P. SIBLEY LOSES HIS WATCH. 

And girls, what do you suppose our 
dearly beloved prof was thinking 
about to leave his finery around like 
that? Who can it be? Call the re- 
porters! 



RARE BITS 



Kellogg and Reichert, Incorporated 
spent the week end in Chicago and 
had a wonderful time! 



A Word for the 
Y. M. C. A. 

I see by the papers that the War 
Dept. is to investigate the charges of 
returning dough boys against the Y. 
I hope they do as I am sure the Y. 
will be exonerated. It is the nature 
of the beast to complain, and the Ger- 
man propagandists fan the flames 
against the Y. The soldiers follow 
like sheep and take up the cry, with- 
out knowing what they are really op- 
posed to in the Y. Some are simply 
careless, others ignorant, tight-fisted, 
shallow-brained men who think that 
because they wear a uniform the 
whole world should be given to them 
free. I believe the statement of the 
Y. that they have given away more 
than the Red Cross, Knights^)f Co- 
lumbus and Salvation Army combined. 
I have been all over France and I 
have found the Y. everywhere. I 
have yet to run into any of the others, 
though I have not been everywhere, 
of course. At Lyons where thou- 
sands of Americans are passing 
through the city almost daily, there 
is only the Y. to serve them. Some 
of the secretaries are too independent, 
but then the Y. has had to beg for 
men, and in a big corporation there 
must be all kinds. I believe there is 
one charge, though, that the Y. is 
guilty of. That is they have not 
given enough publicity to the difficult- 
ies under which they labor. They 
have not combatted that part of the 
subtle German propaganda directed 
against them. The Germans waged 
the same campaign against the Red 
Cross you remember. The Y. should 
impress upon the misled soldier the 
policy lines along which they have 
worked, resulting in the big things 
they have done for the soldiers. 
When you hear the thing discussed, 
please give publicity to the above. 
Loraine G. Smith ('17) 



Suggestions for vows 
for Lent 

Swear off eating hash — it will be 
more practice than swearing off ice 
cream or candy. 



Swear off going to classes unneces- 
sarily. 



Don't study between 7 and 10 P. 
ML or 2.30 and 6 o'clock. 



Mrs. Fred Martin has been the 
guest of her daughter Josephine. 



Notes on the Game 

Maplesden believes in "taking a 
bat at em" when the referee is not 
looking. Dangerous business Mape. 
Might have a bat-eyed referee some 
day. 



Eddy believes in getting all the 
expense money due him. Almost got 
some that wasn't due him for rub- 
down. Rumor has it that rub-down 
was "dew" though. 



When it comes to "roughing it up" 
we have yet to find Capt. Jack's su- 
perior. He shakes a wicked knee. 



Close guarding kept "Swamp" 
Marsh bouncing the ball about like 
a pea on a griddle, but he kept 
bouncing it in his own territory. 



"Sheik" McCormack, queen of the 
"dizzies," had a hard luck day for 
baskets, but he was saving em for 
Beloit. 



High Honor to a 
Lake Forest Man 

Supt. Ellis P. Graff, *97, now Super- 
intendent of Schools at Indianapolis, 
has just been selected for the Presi- 
dent of the National Education Asso- 
ciation for the coming year, the high- 
est honor in the gift of the public 
school association. The Stentor in 
behalf of the College extends to him 
most cordial congratulations. 

In our issue of November 9th, 1917, 
we said, in connection with the selec- 
tion of Mr. Graff for superintendent 
at Indianapolis, in substance the fol- 
lowing: Born at Red Oak, Iowa, in 
1875 and now consequently about 44 
years of age, Mr. Graff was graduated 
:t Lake Forest with the class of 1897 
and for the next few years was prin- 
ipal of the high school at Red Oak, 
Iowa. In 1901 he went to Marshall- 
town, Iowa, where he remained until 
190 4 when he was promoted to the 
principalship of the high school at 
Rockford. From Rockford in 1907 he 
went to Omaha as principal of the 
high school and in 1911 was made 
superintendent of the Omaha schools. 
He was given the degree of M. A. by 
Lake Forest in 1916. 

From the above summary it will 
be seen that Mr. Graff's progress in 
the educational world has been con- 
stant and rapid. His new office lays 
upon him much responsibility in 
shaping educational policies, but his 
varied experience and wide acquaint- 
ance among educators should make 
his course of action pretty definite. 



THE STENTOE 



127 



Tom, Dick, and Harry 

We thank you for the cordiality of 
your reception of our column and for 
the interest demonstrated by the large 
number of queries and requests for 
publicity which have been flooding 
our office. We will do our little best 
and only ask you to be patient with 
us. Lack of space prevents us print- 
ing all the material sent in this 
week — but if necessary the Stentor 
will devote an entire issue to the 
patrons of this column. 



Concerning the awarding of the 
crocheted bicycle rack, we wish to 
announce that owing to the inclement 
weather during the past week the 
fussing contestants have been some- 
what handicapped so we are extend- 
ing the time indefinitely. We wish it 
known however, that this is no fake 
contest and the prize is being care- 
fully treasured in a little black box. 
It is the latest collapsible model and 
will doubtless prove very useful dur- 
ing the Spring days to come. 



We are in receipt of a request from 
Mildred Zenos that she be featured 
some time soon — but in some nice 
way — not in connection with any 
scandal as there are so many sub- 
scribers to the paper who know her 
and who might be shocked if she 
were to be featured as an accomplice 
in a robbery or embezzlement. In 
reply we hasten to assure Mildred that 
knowing her unimpeachable repu- 
tation and integrity of character we 
would not consider printing her name 
except with glowing words of praise. 



For Sale or Trade — A perfectly 
good as new House Committee — ap- 
ply to Eloise Brown, House President. 



Personal — Keith Marsh, "If you 
will send us a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope we will send you some in- 
formation which will be of vital in- 
terest to you after July 1." 

X. Y. Z. 



Ken Nef told us that the boys don't 
play with him the way he wants to, 
so he comes to the Hall to dance with 
the girls (??) after luncheon — Oh 
well, what's the odds, his little play- 
mate lives here anyhow. 



Notice — If you desire a personal 
answer send a stamped envelope and 
5c in coin and we will give you the 
information you want. 

The Editor. 



Mel. Gray Awarded 

Croix de Guerre 

with Palm 

Lieutenant Melvin Gray, '16, has 
been decorated by the French gov- 
ernment. Here is Mel's account of 
the performance — 

"Sometime ago, the entire Division 
stood on a hill and almost froze — 
while some of the members were be- 
ing decorated. The general said that 
the occasion was important because 
the French Government was decorat- 
ing American soldiers on German 
soil on the birthday of the ex-Kaiser. 
Personally I thought it was important 
because one of the members being 
decorated was from Joliet — but then 
— some people have queer ideas. At 
any rate — when the ceremony was 
over, I found myself in possession of a 
Croix de guerre with the palm — and 
I am still wondering why. I have an 
army citation which says little or 
nothing, and says all of it in French 
— so that it is not entirely clear. It 
has been a funny war. If you re- 
mind me of it — when I get back — I 
will tell you something about deco- 
rations in general. 

"From where I sit, I can lean a 
little forward and gaze down a few 
hundred feet on the statue of Wm. I, 
which stands, facing down stream at 
the point where the Moselle enters 
the Rhine. The figure is mounted on 
a huge horse which is at the point of 
prancing off its pedestal — and at first 
sight it is entirely imposing. If I 
look a little closer, tho, I can see 
small patrol-boats darting in and out 
between the big barges going up and 
down the river, and all these little 
patrol-boats fly the American flag. I 
wonder if, when these little boats 
pass before the eyes of this figure on 
watch, he does not feel like getting 
down off his great horse and going 
home. I should think so. I should 
think the great horse, when he first 
saw such unbelievable sights would 
have naturally reared, balked and 
pranced himself off his com- 
paratively small platform. Neither of 
these things have happened though, 
and I merely remark that I am sur- 
prised. 

"It might be of interest to know 
that the window at which I am sit- 
ting is one of many of the Fortress 
'Ehrenbreistein.' The fortress is lo- 
cated just across the river from Cob- 
lenz and on a hill so high that those 
who have walked up, call it a moun- 
tain. The fortress has a history 
which start in the 16th century, ad- 



mits capture by the French in the 
17th, and boasts of rebuilding in the 
18th. It is a natural fortification, 
and when re-enforced by the great 
walls and ramparts it seems exempt 
from anything except modern artil- 
lery. All this is of small importance, 
and what I really meant to tell you 
is that we are in the fortress, and 
apparently here to stay." 



Elsie Engel spent the week end in 
Chicago the guest of friends. 



Ruth Kennedy spent the week end 
in Chicago visiting relatives. 




When tailored 

in the Jerrems way, 
adapted to a man's 
individuality, avoid- 
ing extreme fads, 
your clothes will 
continue in style un- 
til they have given 
a full measure of 
service. 



Suits and Overcoats 

Prices $40 to $75 



fleMeri 




7^— 

Three Stores: 

7 North La Salle St. 

3 1 4 S. Michigan Ave. 

7 1 E. Monroe St. 



128 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 
Roard of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '19. 

Gwendotyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Lawrence Maplesden, '21. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters: 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

Horace Horton, '20. 

Howard Wood, *22. 

Professor W. R. Bridgeman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffiee of Lake For- 
est. Illinois, as second-class matter. 



Lake Forest. If those of us who are 
talking about going to another college 
would have to present a plausible set 
of reasons for leaving Lake Forest, 
and another set of advantages to be 
gained by the change we wonder how 
many could do it. Why not have a 
little "time of silence" and do some 
serious thinking on the subject. Then 
when you go home for vacation do 
your speaking. Lake Forest has a 
great many advantages other colleges 
lack. A week end visit to another 
school is not a fair standard by which 
to judge that school. Boost Lake 
Forest to your friends. Your home 
town is not a place in which to crab 
about your college. If tearing asun- 
der is necessary for your peace of 
mind why rip away while you are 
here, but remember there is also a 
time to sew, and a patched garment 
never looks quite as well as one that 
has never been ripped. 



SIGNS of spring are appearing. 
Perhaps you haven't noticed the 
fact but robins have been chirp- 
ing merrily in the ravines and frosh 
poetry has begun to float around the 
campus. Spring naturally suggests 
vacation, and perhaps you may have 
noticed that spring vacation is only 
two weeks distant. Now just exactly 
what does spring vacation mean to 
you? The average answer probably 
Is — "A chance to go home and sleep." 
But are you going to do anything be- 
sides sleep, and possibly eat? Why 
not do a little boosting for Lake For- 
est College in the spare moments be- 
tween your meals and your naps? 

The Stentor has been criticised for 
crabbing about things in general, in- 
cluding people who do the crabbing. 
Far. be it from us to condemn the 
honorable crab. How would we ever 
fill the aforesaid Stentor without his 
worthy assistance. But as somebody 
or other remarked a few years ago, 
"There is a time to rend and a time 
to sew, a time to keep silence and a 
time to speak." Now all of us do 
more or less rending while we are 
here. A great many of us are con- 
tinually talking about the joys of 
some other school. Wouldn't It be 
better if we would keep silent for a 
time and do a little thinking about 



In Menioriam 

The faculty and student body were 
saddened by the news Thursday, Feb- 
ruary, 27th, of the death of Helen 
Lockard who passed away at Alice 
Home after a short illness. Less than 
three weeks previously she was mov- 
ed from Lois Durand Hall and was 
supposed to be suffering from a slight 
nervous breakdown. For several days 
her condition baffled the doctors and 
then grew steadily more serious. 
Even though little assurance was 
given during the last few days, her 
friends confidently hoped that she 
would recover. 

On Friday, a memorial service was 
held in the Chapel at which Dr. M. 
Bross Thomas and Rev. George 
Roberts officiated. The flowers sent 
by the College and students filled the 
chancel and the service was most im- 
pressive. 

Helen Lockard came to Lake Forest 
College last September from Raton, 
New Mexico. She entered as a fresh- 
man, was an active member of her 
class, a member of the Girls' Glee 
Club, and of the Sigma Tau Sorority. 
She was also a regular contributor to 
the Stentor. Although she had spent 
only a few months in Lake Forest, 
she left many friends and acquaint- 
ances who sympathize most deeply 
with Mrs. Lockard in her great sor- 
row. 



Mrs. Bridgman En- 
tertains Freshmen 

A most delightful party was given 
to the Freshmen girls by Mrs. Bridg- 
man on Monday afternoon. The 
amusements began with the very en- 
joyable game, magical music. Then 
came the all important gastronomic 
gratification. Mrs. Bridgman lived up 
to her reputation in serving most 
delicious refreshments. The girls 
simply marveled over them. Two 
contest games were played before a 
cheery grate fire, after the repast. 

In the first contest the girls strug- 
gled over some of Shakspere's quot- 
ations. It was really quite instruc- 
tive to hear some of the quotations, 
otherwise not known to exist, which 
were attributed to Bill. The prize, a 
beautiful hyacinth, given in recogni- 
tion of superior merit, was awarded 
to Rebecca Armstrong. 

The second contest, on pictures cut 
from popular advertisements afforded 
more fun. There were two stars this 
time; Vera Pettigrew and Elaine 
Kellogg tied in the number of correct 
answers. When lots were drawn to 
know who should receive the charm- 
ing narcissus, Vera lost. 

The girls left, rather reluctantly, 
at three minutes to six to partake of 
cabbage and stew served in Lois Hall 
for their dinner at six. 



Glee Club Entertain- 
ed by Mrs. Thomas 

Monday afternoon at four o'clock 
Mrs. Thomas entertained the Lois 
Hall Glee Club with a pleasant little 
tea at her home on the South Campus. 
Mrs. Thomas' teas are always very 
delightful, and the girls spent a most 
enjoyable afternoon having tea in the 
candle light with Dr. and Mrs. 
Thomas. 

The Glee Club is to assist at an 
Easter Program at the Presbyterian 
Church on April the twentieth. Mrs. 
Thomas has charge of the rehearsals 
and the girls of the club are urged to 
cooperate with her in order that a 
successful program may be given. 



Miss Hamilton spent the greater 
part of last week in Chicago attend- 
ing the meetings of the National Edu- 
cational Association. On Wednesday 
a number of the girls who are in her 
Education class also attended the 
meetings. 



THE STENTOR 



Lieut. Kauffman, '12 

Writes of Trip Through 

Luxembourg 

(Cont. from last week.) 

On the return trip we went on 
up to the city of Luxembourg 
for the night, and I think I had 
more fun than even in Paris. It is 
surely a gay and interesting place, 
the best this side of Paris. Met a 
really stunning young actress that 
evening at the ratskellar, booked for 
the Orpheum in the States next year. 
She spoke very little French and I 
practically no German, so we didn't 
have any very complex conversations, 
but somehow or other you get away 
amazingly well in those circum- 
stances. I'd like to have a record of 
some of the part French, part Ger- 
man, part English conversations I've 
been mixed up in since we crossed 
the Luxembourg border. We stayed 
two days in Trier, distributing to the 
1st Battalion which is scattered 
around there, and then set out for 
Coblenz, on Monday morning, expect- 
ing to make it that evening, or the 
next at the very latest, in time to get 
clean and have Xmas at home. We 
made it the evening after Xmas, af- 
ter averaging from 15 to 20 miles a 
day on the road, and having a reg- 
ular struggle to get through at all. 
We were advised to take the moun- 
tain road, and probably it was as 
good as any, but we were heavily 



loaded and Xmas Eve it snowed — 
eight inches. The first evening we 
made the town of Kaiseresch, in the 
rain, way after dark, with 30 men to 
billet and get supper for. Part of 
the 4th Division was there, and the 
town was already crowded, but I fin- 
ally got them fixed and started to roll 
up in one of the trucks myself, rather 
than bother to hunt a bed. Before I 
did I went into the house in front of 
which we were parked, for a drink 
of water. The woman of the house, 
the what-do-you-call-her ? — Hausfrau 
— looked me over, and asked me if 
I'd had supper. I was forced to ad- 
mit, always truthful, that I had not, 
so she started to fix me up, and be- 
fore she finished she'd done a wonder- 
ful job of it. You know how much 
Xmas means in Germany, the whole 
week is a holiday and they start in 
baking all kinds of things several 
days before. Well, the big table in 
the living room . was simply loaded 
with cakes and pies and cookies — I 
don't know where she got so much 
flour, but she certainly had a lay-out 
of good things to eat — and they mov 
ed those and got me supper. Liver 
wurst, potatoes, salad, coffee, apple 
pie (not regular apple pie, but the 
sort of thing you used to make some- 
times, with apples on top and no up- 
per crust), and finally, what do you 
think? — animal cookies! Yep, just 
like mother used to make, the same 
sheep and chicken and rabbit on the 
dead run. and dog, only it was a 



dachshund — I swear it was the next 
thing to being home. I told her my 
mother made cookies like that. She 
was a very fine woman, unusual for 
the country around there, strong, cap- 
able and very intelligent. She spoke 
French, and told me that before the 
war she had managed a big hotel up 
in Dusseldorf, but that the war had 
spoiled the business entirely. I gave 
her some coffee, sugar, white bread 
and tomatoes from what I had on the 
truck, and a bar of chocolate. Ger- 
many, individually and collectively 
craves chocolate, the kids pester you 
for it continually, and you can get 
anything with it that they have, 
which isn't much. Soap the same; 
there are practically no fats in the 
country. German soap, what little 
there is, sells for $75 a pound. Fact. 
(My striker paid for my whole wash- 
ing last week with three bars of 
soap.) [Must have been a life's wash- 
ing, Ed.] And then Mein Herr ap- 
peared, a very pleasant, friendly man 
of about 50, and I brought him in 



STUDENTS desiring to work an 
hour or more a day can make 
wages of moi e than $ 1 .00 per hour 
selling "America's War for Hu- 
manity" and "Life of Roosevelt " 
Send at once for free outfit 

F. B. DICKERSON CO., 
Detroit, Michigan 

enclosing 20c in stamps for mail- 
ing outfits. 




The Original 

"Mable Sykes" 

DIAMOND MEDAL -:- ARTIST -:- PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 

140 North State Street 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts. ) 

Established at present location since 1906 
MAKER OF HY-CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 
Phone Central 5341 




130 



THE STENTOR 





STYLES 


THAT 


PLEASE 


for 


COLLEGE MEN 


and WOMEN 


RASMUSSEN 


BROS 


. BOOT SHOP 




Market Sq 


U ARE 



USE BOWMAN'S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-109 Vine Ave 



The 

Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop 
Phone I 7 Lake Forest, 111- 




The dailu use ol 

KOSMEO CREAM 

and 

KOSMEO POWDER 

and a weeklu visit to 

Mrs. Graham's 
Beautij Shop 

1432 Stevens Bldg. 

will create a perfect 
complexion. 

TRY IT. 



some American cigars, until relations 
were nicely established and they had 
decided to sleep me as well as feed 
me. They had no extra beds, so son 
was called in and he made me up a 
fine bed in the living room on the 
floor, on a couple of mattresses. Son 
was just back, demobilized, had been 
a striker for a German Colonel for 
four years, and believe me he was a 
good one. We had quite a talk that 
evening, the old man and I, I manag- 
ed to understand him somehow. He 
told me that most of the people, at 
least in the Rhineland, still like the 
old Kaiser, and that the bulk of the 
blame for the war doesn't rest on him 
but on the Big Three, Von Tirpitz, 
Von Ludendorf and Von Bethmann 
HoIIweg, and on the millionaires, the 
capitalists. All of them tell us that, 
and of course it's mostly true. The 
people generally were so under heel 
that they hadn't much choice but to 
follow in. 

"The Rhenish provinces were least 
strong for war of any, and I think 
are most glad it is over. The Rhine- 
land is practically all Catholic, the 
Rhine seems to be the dividing line. 
According to Father Cary, in a heat- 
ed argument one evening, it was 
Prussian protestantism that brought 
about the war! So there you have it. 
But I was telling you about our epic 
journey with seven broken down 
Pierce trucks. My good friends pre- 
sented me in the morning with two 
fried eggs, the first and last I've seen 
in months, and insisted that I take 
along a package of liverwurst, which 
I did, for it was excellent. Such is 
the treatment one gets in this hostile 
country!" 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Eslablhhtd Ml 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 
73-75 W. South Water Street 

Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



C. T. Gunn Co. 

Grocers 



Agency Huyler's Candies 

Curtice Bros. Goads LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD. Prop. 
Phone 175 

Wh\)? 
Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill'. Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



KUBELSKY &%'?£■„, 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Larsr 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxia at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



131 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 



Dr. G. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



III 

/^LASS Pins and Rings. 

^^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 

CDCTC DDAC 27 B. MONROE St. 

arms bku». Chicago 

1ll!!l!l!!llllllll!!l[|||l!IHHIIIIHIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllin!l!l!!ll!lllll!!!lllililll!!lll!l!lllllllll!l 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave, Highland Park, 111. 



Ill 

/^y For Light 

f T fi Q For Heat 
V^WO for Power 

North Shore Gas Co. 
rnimiMniiifmiiiinuHiri!i!iiiiiiiiiii]iimim]ini];:::]i:i;i:<:i]::!:r:-]iiiimiiuiiimiimiiniiiDiiiiiu 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusive 
Dry Goods Store 




^yfShop/or 

Womens&Childrens furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



North and South 

The sale of fresh fish found a ready 
market at Ferry Hall last Saturday 
evening. 



Here's hoping that Dr. Raymond 
doesn't talk to other members of the 
faculty before the next set of exam- 
inations. 



Thayer! — Classes begin ten min- 
utes after the first bell, not twenty. 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

EXPRESSMAN 

Special Attention Given to Students <| 

TELEPHONE ) Residence 67S 
NUMBERS I Office 384 



Safe 




^*^3^w 



SPALDING 
BASE BALL EQUIPMENT 

Uniforms, Caps, Belts, Stockings, Shoes, 
Bats, Balls, Gloves, Masks, Etc. 

i ' : ■ : ':■ i" ■;■■ on request 

■ . r. SPALDING & BROS. 
211-217 So. State St., Chicago. III. 



Q, 



Ray — "Say, Pete, I belong to the 
music school now." 

Pete — "I thought you would join 
a sorority or a music school some 
day." 



TheV^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Jerry — "You know that the first 
t'tne I danced with you, I danced en- 
tirely upon my nerve." 

Irene — "I wouldn't say that you 
just danced on your nerve." 



Jack Rees with the aid of five or 
six other Sigma Taus has learned the 
manly art of dancing. He is to make 
his debut on Saturday night. 



We have a new chef at the Com- 
mons and so we have no kick to 
make. We hope it isn't a case of a 
new broom. 



Lois Haller: — "Miss Hamilton, may 
I go to the city with John Smith on 
Friday." 

Miss Hamilton: — "Do you think he 
is the kind of a young man your 
mother would care to have you go 
with." 

Lois Haller: — "I think so; he looks 
like the man I go with at home." 



Joy Harvey at Ferry Hall: — "I 
came late to the dance, because my 
man was playing basket ball." 

Are you sure that was the reason 
Mape? 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsfay 

Ladies* Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision Dealers 



Grocery Market 

807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 
Tel. Harrison 515. 516,517 



$74.00 takes beautiful new 

^ * $250.00 mahogany finish 

phonograph and records. Never used. 
60 inches high. Latest design. Will ship 
C O. D. on approval. 

Mrs. Waverly Brown 
317 Greenl«af Ave.. Wilmette, Illinois 



132 



THE STENTOR 




LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

afLAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C, the college work for the rest of the 
year will be reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — will be 
continued for this year; consequently the second term will open on Tuesday, Jan. 7. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY- — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, 111. 



Blllilllllllllllllil 



llllliillllllllllllll 



iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiii 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 



C. G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 
Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 
A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning ■ Pressing ■ Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning and Pressing . $1.50 

Pressing ... . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 

WAUKEGAN 



Phc 



2252 



^J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Co. 

Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 

Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 




The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, March 14, 1919. 



NUMBER IS. 



Garrick Club Presents Snappy Play 

Officer 66S One of Best Things Club Has Done 



After the enforced pruning of two 
wartime winters, Garrick Club has 
blossomed out in all directions at 
once. "Officer 666" was played by 
an all-star cast and the performance, 
though long, went without strain and 
in great good spirits. 

The play was familiar to many of 
the audience from the days when it 
ran in Chicago; these greeted 
each good point with the additional 
pleasure of having anticipated it. 
Those who had never seen the play 
found it, after a slow start, an excit- 
ing and intricate farce with plenty of 
suspense, fun, and love-making. ■ 

Officer 666 himself, as played by 
Carson Hoover in an almost incred- 
ible shirt, came near carrying away 
the honors for sheer acting; though 
happily there were plenty of honors 
to go around. Mr. Hoover, as serious 
and as much abused as Charlie Chap- 
lin, was the dunderhead'ed policeman 
from start to finale and a source of 
much genuine comedy. 

A doubt arose in the second act as 
to whether the heroship of the play 
was eventually to fall to Mr. Offen- 
heiser or to Mr. McFerran who had 
so reprehensibly borrowed the name 
of Gladwin and intended to borrow 
presently the Gladwin pictures also. 
The advantage in many ways lay with 
McFerran, whose part was carefully 
gauged to give him the sympathy of 
the audience in spite of his sins. 

Moreover he was not obliged to be 
funny. Even in the undersized gar- 
ments of Officer 666 he was still at 
liberty to be the handsome crook; 
and looking handsome is no real hard- 
ship for Mr. McFerran. 

Mr. Offenheiser, contrariwise, fell 
sadly from his envied state of blithe 
and debonair man of the world when 
he joined the force. A nightwatch- 
man he might have been, or a janitor 
about to be retired after long and 
laborious service, but a policeman, 
never. Like Maude Adams, Mr. Of- 
fenheiser should be restricted to 



playing himself. To that role he is 
well adapted and in it he is always 
approved by the audience. 

A legitimate quarrel with the play 
is that the women of the cast are 
not particularly important to it. Miss 
Horton, who played cleverly last year 
in "The Twelve-Pound Look" spent 
most of her time waiting wistfully on 
the edge of the swirl of action until 
she should be allowed to appear mo- 
mentarily. 

A pleasant touch of fun was sup- 
plied by Mr. Downs and Miss Goble 
into whose hands was given love af- 
fair No. 2. .Love-making and laugh- 
ing are about the hardest accomplish- 
ments for amateurs to perfect; and 
the two are to be congratulated on 
their success. Their performance had 
a touch of the Audrey and William of 
"As You Like It" — silly young things, 
but rather convincing. 

Mildred Gerlach in Mrs. Burton's 
small part demonstrated Garrick's 
find of a most necessary and useful 
character — the good-looking, energet- 
ic woman of discreet years, always 
available as chaperone. 

Joseph Sieux was a delightful but- 
ler-valet, with possibilities for bigger 
and more serious roles. 

The audience appreciated the music 
supplied by McEvoy and Chatfield- 
Taylor. The latter displayed versatil- 
ity by stage managing before and af- 
ter numbers. 

The play showed much hard work 
by the club and Mr. Troutman. If 
rewards went by merit, doubtless both 
club and director would be rejoiced 
by the gift of a new stage curtain 
from the Easter Rabbit. And if the 
audiences continue as large, perhaps 
the club's treasury may be equal to 
the effort without benevolent inter- 
vention. 



Irvin Hirschy attended the annual 
state dance of the Kappa Kappa Gam- 
ma sorority at Indianapolis last week 
end. 



Sigma Tau Gives Most 

Successful Dance of 

Year 

Wonderful Time Reported by All 

On Saturday evening, March Sth, 
the most successful dance of the year, 
without any exception, was given by 
the Sigma Tau Sorority at the Durand 
Art Institute. 

As you entered the rotunda of the 
Institute you felt at once the festive 
atmosphere of the dance. The ceil- 
ing of the rotunda was a network of 
narrow stripes of lavender and pur- 
ple, over the stairway was a double 
archway of the same, with wisteria 
blossoms strewn over the arch; the 
pillars were woven in white and 
green, and there too, were the pretty 
wisteria flowers. Upon the "mezzan- 
ine" floor were cosy corners which 
were a very novel idea. After the 
men were given the programs and 
favors — cigarette cases for them, and 
memorandums for the girls — you 
passed down the receiving line com- 
posed of Lillian Evans, Leon McFer- 
ran, Mr. and Mrs. Rogers. Miss Ham- 
ilton, Dr. and Mrs. Wright and Prof. 
McNeill. Then the grand march 
started, led by Eloise Brown and 
Francis McFerran. The auditorium 
was a perfect bower of wisteria. The 
ceiling here was a net work of wide 
strips of lavender and purple. In the 
center of the room there was a huge 
light, covered with pink and hung 
thickly from this were long clusters 
of wisteria. The lights in the cor- 
ners were miniatures of the same 
type. 

When the orchestra, which was 
composed of five of Benson's best 
players, started playing everyone 
knew that the evening was absolutely 
complete. Delicious punch and cakes 
were served during the evening. 

When the orchestra played the last 
piece everyone was disappointed that 
the dance was ending and we all say 
that the Sigma Taus certainly had a 
wonderful party. 



134 



THE STENTOR 



Discussion Tryouts 

Arouse Much 

Interest 



The Preliminary Discussion Con- 
tests this year were the most interest- 
ing Lake Forest has heard for 
some time. Perhaps it would be more 
correct to say they are the first any 
considerable part of the student body 
has ever heard. Two chapel hours 
last week were devoted to these con- 
tests, and if the interest and appreci- 
ation of the audience is an aid to good 
speaking the contestants most certain- 
ly were favored. 

On Thursday five speakers, Tom 
Hale, Dean Barrick, John Morley, Lois 
Ryno, and Raymond Moore discussed 
Bolshevism pro and con. In spite of 
the rather intricate subject the entire 
performance was most creditable. 
Lois Ryno had evidently made an ex- 
haustive study of the Russian Prob- 
lem and presented the more favor- 
able side of Bolshevistic principles. 
Raymond Moore confined himself to 
an interesting explanation of the 
Soviet form of government. The 
other three speakers discussed the 
more or less usual arguments against 
Bolshevism. 

On Friday morning the subject was 
the American Press. Ernest Coberly, 
James Leonard, Ernest Cox, and Eu- 
gene Tucker gave their views of this 
interesting subject. Three of the 
speakers, Cox, Leonard, and Coberly 
condemned the press most severely. 
Their points were well made and were 
convincing. Tucker's confessions of 
iniquity were perhaps the most in- 
teresting feature of the entire contest. 
Tommy spoke from deep personal ex- 
perience and a certain portion of his 
audience shuddered apprehensively 
when it heard that the step following 
Journalism usually was Jail. The B. 
M. of the Stentor was heard to won- 
der audibly whether Tommy might 
be able to sell the policy of the Sten- 
tor to the South Campus for a few 
paid up subscriptions. That engag- 
ing smile might accomplish even such 
a miracle. 

The decision of the judges favored 
the following candidates who will take 
part in the finals, R. Moore, E. Tuck- 
er, L. Ryno, E. Coberly, J. Leonard, 
with E. Cox as alternate. The second 
third, and fourth, contestants ranked 
within one point of each other so a 
most interesting final discussion may 
be expected. 



Beloit Leads "Little Five" Conference 

Lake Forest Loses Hard Fought Game 



In a hard fought game character- 
ized by close guarding and rough 
play, the Red and Black went down 
before the Beloit College five on their 
floor March 8. This defeat places 
Lake Forest as runners-up, provided 
they win from Naperville in their re- 
turn game here Saturday afternoon 
March 15. 

Beloit's play was materially aided 
by the return of Miles, their husky 
center and this addition combined 
with very close guarding forced our 
boys to long shots from a little past 
the center of the floor. The first half 
ended 5 to 3 in favor of Beloit and 
it looked like another hot finish game. 

Coming back with a rush both 
teams countered back and forth 
through most of the second half with 
neither side scoring. Then slowly but 
surely Beloit crept ahead until they 
had a good lead. With only a few 
minutes to play they started scientific 
stalling and managed to keep the 
ball at their end of the floor by hold- 
ing it and passing it among them- 
selves with no attempt at working it 
down the floor for a basket. 

The referee allowed the game to get 



away from him in the first half and 
was unable to hold it in check later 
on. The result was a combination 
wrestling match and prize fight 
with the referee a little prone to see 
fouls on our boys somewhat sooner 
than on the Beloit contestants. Had 
this not been the case the score would 
undoubtedly have been closer, but 
still in Beloit's favor, for it must be 
admitted our boys were out-played, 
but not out-fought. Their spirit was 
good, as it has been all season, and 
whatever their final position in the 
percentage column at the end of the 
year they are a team of which the 
college may well be proud, always 
giving their best, and not always un- 
der the most ideal conditions. 

Beloit's claim is perhaps unques- 
tioned, but it would be still more de- 
cisive had they played two games 
with Naperville as every other con- 
ference team has done. In so small 
a conference the rule should be pass- 
ed that every team shall play the 
same number of games before any 
claims to championship can be con- 
sidered. 



Lineup: 



LAKE FOREST — 8 



Eddy, r. f. 
Marsh, 1. f. 
McCormack, c. 
Rees, J., r. g. 
Maplesden, 1. g. 
Schick. 1. g. 



|B|F 


P 


T 


1 2 


1 





2 


1 





1 





1 





2 





o I 


2 





0|0 


1 






BELOIT — 16 


B 


F 


P 


T 


Beimer, r. f. 


3 











Coe, 1. f. 


1 





1 





Miles, c. 














Witte, r. g. 


1 





1 





Stirling, 1. g. 


2 


2 








Van Epps, c. 















Registration Days for 
Third Quarter 

Thursday and Friday, March 13th 
and 14th, were registration days for 
the spring quarter. Several new 
courses are being offered. Dr. Allee 
is giving a four hour lecture course 
on Heredity and Evolution which is 
open to Seniors and to all others who 
have had one year of Biology. 

Dr. Wright is taking the War Is- 
sues Class, the work this quarter will 
be devoted to the philosophic back- 
ground of the nations involved. 

Lillian Stephens is ill at Lois Dur- 
and Hall, her friends are hoping for 
her speedy recovery. 



Helen Hopkins of Sterling was the 
guest of Gwendolyn Massey last week 
end. 



Presbyterian Secretary 
Addresses Pupils 

On Wednesday morning Dr. Clarke 
of the Presbyterian Board of Edu- 
cation spoke in chapel. Mr. Clarke's 
subject was "Man's need for a higher 
spiritual life." 

Sigma Tau entertained the follow- 
ing people over the week end: Helen 
Gushing Helfrich, Ruby Hall Marquis, 
Gretta Patterson Shepherd, Mrs. Rae 
Talcott, Alice Douglas, Marjorie Et- 
nyre, Delia Babcock, Mabel Etnyre, 
Madeline Hoover, Sara Jane Ross, 
Clara Clarke, Jessie Carr, Carol 
Sampson, Edwina Fraser and Mar- 
garet Bridgman. 



Dorothy Wales spent the week end 
with her sister Virginia. 



THE STENTOR 



135 



Music School Notes 

Ml SIC SCHOOL GIVES BOB PABTY 

Last Thursday night the Music 
School took advantage of the beauti- 
ful weather and gave a sleighing 
party. About 7:30 o'clock a dozen 
or more merry makers left North 
Hall and with Miss Lottchen Knaak 
as master of revelry wound their way 
around the outskirts of the town. All 
along the course the clear brisk air 
was rent with the song and laughter 
of the jolly crowd, while the sleigh 
bells jingled a merry tune. With the 
beautiful moonlight, the sparkling, 
newly fallen snow, and the mild tem- 
perature it surely was a rare treat. 

On returning to the hall a few 
hours later ragtime was substituted 
for sleighbells and the party took to 
dancing. To cap the climax and 
make the occasion ideal, hot choco- 
late, candy, and cookies were served 
in one of the studios where Miss 
Milinowski entertained. The time of 
departure came all too soon, and the 
party dispersed with much happy 
mirth. 



Jen and Mary 

Lois Hall is energetically keeping 
Lent. 

Marion Preston swears off swear- 
ing. 

H. Barnthouse, E. Wise, and Bea 
Worthley swear off hanging around 
the hall. 

Gladys Reichert and Elaine Kel- 
logg swear off spending their week 
ends in the hall. 

Ruth Bihlert swears off her name 
— it's now Martha. 

Anne Sillar and Ruth Kenyon swear 
off studying after eleven P. M. They 
are working up to the point where 
they can quit studying altogether 
without an injurious shock to their 
nervous systems. 

Miss Hamilton swears off attend- 
ing chapel. 

The Very Secret Order of Sacchar- 
ine Spooners solemnly swear off 
spending their evenings in the In- 
stitute. 

This column swears off swearing off 
swearing. 



position. This exercise is rather com- 
plicated but with constant practice It 
can be easily accomplished. 
III. Finger Exercise. 

Practice slipping small cards from 
sleeve to fingers and back. Also prac- 
tice slipping cards from palm to back 
of hand, etc. 

If difficulty is found in any of these 
exercises diagrams can be obtained by 
sending the slight sum of nineteen 
cents and a self addressed envelope 
to Doctor Revvans, Box 23 — Fake 
Forest. 



Mildred Zenos attended a dance at 
the Blackstone in Chicago last Friday 
evening. 



On Saturday night the Music School 
made its first concert tour.. A troupe 
consisting of Miss Milinowski, Miss 
Colton, and Miss Best journeyed to 
the First Methodist Church of Wauk- 
egan where a program was rendered 
to an appreciative audience of Jack- 
ies, grown ups, and children. After the 
concert there were games and re- 
freshments, the troupe enjoyed giv- 
ing the entertainment and especially 
appreciated the hearty welcome given 
them by Mr. Rompel. 



Wad the gods the giftie gae us — 
To see the profs — before they see us. 



Miss Wacile Turner from the Co- 
lumbia School of Expression spent 
last week end with Vesta Votaw. 



Francilia Smith spent the week end 
in Chicago with her father. 



The Music School, graciously invited 
by Miss Tremaine, enjoyed the excep- 
tional advantage of hearing Robert 
Nichols, a modern English poet. Be- 
cause he has taken active part in the 
war, his war poetry is very tense and 
expressive. He lectured about the 
other young English poets many of 
whom have seen service, and read 
from their works with great charm of 
manner. 



Setting up exercises to be taken 
night and morning during the week — 
March 17-21. 

I. Exercising Toes. 

Sit upright in correct position for 
writing. Now bend slowly forward 
focusing the left eye on the place 
where the instructor should be, and 
keeping the right eye focused on the 
left toe of the left foot. Pivot the 
left foot on the heel and slowly swing 
the toe to the starboard as if turn- 
ing the pages of a book. Great dex- 
terity can be attained by practicing 
this simple exercise fourteen times 
twice a day. Do not overdo the first 
few times — there is danger of sprain- 
ing the toe. 

n. Neck Exercise. 

The second exercise takes two 
persons, A and B. They can reverse 
positions often in order to give prac- 
tice to both. A sits directly in front 
of B. B slowly bends torso forward 
and to the left, stretches neck as far 
forward as possible keeping the chin 
well forward and the eyes on the pro- 
fessor. ' B moves slowly to the right 
pushing imaginary paper to the left. 
A quickly drops eyes to B's imaginary 
paper — glancing often at the instruc- 
tor. B moves to the left again and 
A gradually sinks back to original 




Dependability — 

As to the length of life and 
resiliency of the fabrics, and 
as to the construction of your 
clothes — 

Is What Counts 



That's why we put all our 
knowledge into buying the 
RIGHT SORT OF FAB- 
RIC — 

Fabrics of the finest textures 
and of the latest weaves — 
That's why we devote our ut- 
most skill in tailoring — 
so as to express gracefully, 
the lines of your figure — 
so that the clothes will retain 
that Air of Distinction which 
is soon lost in less perfect 
clothes. 

THESE are the qualities that 
make JERREMS' clothes so 
desirable — so dependable. 



Prices $40, $45, $50 
and upwards 




Tailor for Young Men 

Three Stores: 

7 North La Salle St. 

3 1 4 S. Michigan Ave. 

7 1 E. Monroe St. 



136 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 
Board of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '19. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Spreeher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Lawrence Maplesden, '21. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

Horace Horton, '20. 

Howard Wood, '22. 

Professor W. R. Bridgeman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



THE preliminaries to the discus- 
sion contests have come and 
gone. Everyone agrees that the 
speeches were very interesting and 
decidedly worth while but one won- 
ders just how many of the student 
body would have taken the trouble to 
come out, should the contests have 
been held in the evening as in former 
years — a small enough number prob- 
ably, as the experience of the past has 
shown. Every time an activity of 
this sort comes up we crab about the 
lack of spirit in the student body and 
then we think that our duty is done. 
But is it? In the first place, why is 
it that we do not unite in our support 
of college activities. Is it because we 
are simply indifferent or because we 
are too lazy to show any interest 
which we may feel in these events? 
We all agree, don't we, that the dis- 
cussion contests and other activities 
which arouse little enthusiasm now 
are decidedly worth supporting? This 
year's plan of having the prelimin- 
ary contests at chapel time was a 
good one. Maybe some of us will be 
awakened and realize that the event 
exists, and that we owe our support 
to those who have interest and energy 
enough to take part so well. In addi- 
tion may it be suggested that more 
students ought to take part. Probably 



it seems rather late to make such a 
suggestion, but is it? Why can't 
some of the students who will be 
here next year resolve now to enter 
the contest. Our interest has been 
awakened from its sleep of years past, 
but let us keep it awake and make it 
grow. 

LOIS HALL has been run for 
years under the Student Govern- 
ment plan. This plan has al- 
ways proved good and efficient but the 
responsibility of carrying it on suc- 
cessfully, rests not only on the House 
President and the house committee, 
but on each member of the Hall, in- 
dividually. Unless each one of us 
realizes this, the government under 
which we live will fall far short of 
its possibilities. 

First af all, these rules were made 
by Lois Hall girls, not by any older 
body of people whose idea was to re- 
strict and make miserable the mem- 
bers of the Lois Hall household. They 
were rules deemed necessary and use- 
ful by Lois Hallers just like us, who 
were here several years ago. They 
decided that self government, and self 
supervision were the best things for 
the girls. They brought out and em- 
phasized personal honor, responsibil- 
ity, and sacrifice. Surely we are all 
capable of these. In order that the 
government be specific and not too 
elastic these girls thought it wise to 
instigate rules of conduct which 
would work for the highest good of 
every one in the Hall. This they did 
and handed down to us our rules 
which have been changed and modi- 
fied so as to meet the needs 'Of differ- 
ent times. These rules are ours to 
make, to obey, and to correct. They 
are for our best development, and the 
improvement of Hall life. 

Knowing tnis, is it loyal to break 
them, ignore them or criticize them? 
It's not how much you can get away 
with, but how well you can conform 
to them that really counts. Every 
Lois Haller knows this and should be 
compelled by her loyalty to school, to 
hall, and to the other girls, to do all 
in her power to make our life here 
what it should be. 



Y. W. C. A. Elections 

At the annual Y.W.C.A. elections 
Thursday, March 6, the following of- 
ficers were chosen: . 

President . . . .Josephine Martin 

Vice-President Lois Ryno 

Secretary Margaret Mills 

Treasurer Sara Fisher 



North and, South 

Professor Raymond — (speaking of 
family attitude toward the man's 
business when the latter is not the 
most respectable) — "The wife may 
not approve of her husband's busi- 
ness but says, 'I didn't marry the 
business, I married the man.' " 

Mudge: — (apparently much inter- 
ested) — "That's the proper attitude." 



What was Hansen doing out at the 
cemetery last Thursday after mid- 
night? 



Yesterday, today was tomorrow, 
Carpe diem! — Prof. Raymond. 



While we are here on terra firma, 
President Wilson is probably on vice 
versa. — Prof. Raymond. 



Eichoff: "If the country does go 
dry what will happen to all the sur- 
plus liquor?" 

Prof. R. "I hope it shall have gone 
into the interior." 



Advice from Prof. Van — 

"If you can ever get in contact with 
a painter who can paint or a poet 
who can poem, do so." 



Heard on the campus — 

"Do you like the rain?" 

"Not as well as Fat likes Lo- 
rain(e) " 



How Lake Forest Looks 
at Neufchateau 

The following are extracts from a 
letter written Feb. 5th and received 
very recently. He is stationed at 
Neufchateau, France. 

"It seems very probable that there 
will be an increase in numbers next 
year due to boys returning from the 
service. Believe me, I surely want to 
be one of those to return to Lake 
Forest. It surely makes a difference 
in the man to have had a college edu- 
cation. 

"It looks as though our unit was 
loomed to be among the last to re- 
turn — the reason being the nature of 
our work. We have the task of keep- 
ing in lepair all motor vehicles in 
this sector and that is no small one. 
Certain makes of vehicles are desig- 
nated for overhaul at certain repair 
parks, about five here in the advance 
section. Our list contains only three 
American made trucks, the Liberty, 
O.M.C. and Peerless, and the two 
types of motorcycles in use over here. 
(Continued on page 139.) 



THE STENTOR 



137 



Mice and Maple Creams 

BY AGGIE TIST 

Dear Louie: 

Do you remember the way we use- 
ta always write letters — all ungraru- 
atieal and mispellt, and meant-to-be 
clever, just for fun? Well, last time 
I wrote to you was like that, but you 
didn't get it, because these foxy re- 
porters for their old Stentor paper 
got aholt of it and thot it was such 
good stuff they printed it. Some 
guys, being jealous of course, might 
say they had to fill up space, but if 
you'd even been to college and studied 
Greek, you'd call them "Sour Grapes." 

The fate of that last letter humil- 
iated me so I swore off and now I'm 
writing seriously, to ask you a heavy 
problem — You have to listen to a 
sortofa long story to get the detales. 

There's a girl in the hall which has 
a peech of a room mate, which we can 
call "Buddy" — well that is she's tutti 
frutti except when it comes to the 
Golden Rule. You see, she wasn't 
created generous with her food, like 
her folks was. One day she ("Bud- 
dy") went to the big city (we all 
get there once inawhile) and th'e Girl 
and her chum were kind a worried 
about the architecture and so began 
to inspect the room to see if it was 
fireproof and all O.K. and they aci- 
dentally happened on quite a lot of 
etables. You can see the natural 
thing to do in such a case, for there 
was no telling but what the food 



might spoil, so these girls wasn't so 
stupid and they saw the natural Thing 
to Do and they did it. Well, some 
other girls in the Hall "smelt a. 
mouse" (that's mearly an expression, 
but pertains to later developments) 
and all of a sudden the Girl became 
comparatively popular (at least that 
is, her room did) and simultaniously 
a box of maple creams disappeared. 

The scene in which "Buddy" re- 
turns and rents her feelings is cut 
out by the O. C. and so the next ac- 
tion takes place when "Buddy" in- 
quires politely of the Chum whether 
she had heard of an invention by 
which Maple Creams automatically 
flew out of their natural abode. Said 
Chum disagreed with "Buddy" as to 
what was the natural abode, but ex- 
plained the disappearance of the M. 
Cs., whereupon "Buddy" spouts 
forth amid much supprised tittering 
and efforts at self control, "Why, you 
know I was going to pass those choco- 
lates to the girls, but I just didn't 
have the heart, seeing as how the 
mice had been at them." 

The Chum recovered to announce 
the news to the rest of the Offenders 
and to give rise to the inevitable 
question — 

Were the mice the reason? 

I'm asking you. Louie, what's the 
answer? 

Another thing in that last letter- 
I told you about a certain smart Alech 
(his name's not Alech, but far be 
from us to mention real names) and 



he had the nerve to tell me that the 
epistle was in "an exaggeration 
style." Of course, it's plainly obvious 
he couldn't see through the rouge, so 
I wouldn't give him satisfaction, one 
laugh in my sleeve. 

Well, so long Louie, answer soon 
to my vital question because action 
in the future depends on it for the 
Girl was 

Your own, 

Aggie T. 



Elizabeth Tredway was the guest 
of Larraine McClay over the week 
end, and attended Sigma Tau Formal. 



Lillian Stephens entertained Char- 
lotte Brickman over the week end. 



Josephine Martin had as her guest, 
Mardelle Meents. 



Sara Moore has returned after 
spending several days at her home 
in Aurora. 



Margaret Mills spent the week end 
at home in Chicago. 




a 




v 



DIAMOND MEDAL -:- ARTIST -:- PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 



140 North State Street 

(Opposite Fields- cor. State and Randolph Sts.) 

Established at present location since 1906 

MAKER OF HY-CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 

Phone Central 5341 





138 



THE STENTOR 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



use BOWMAN'S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-109 Vine Ave 



The 
I) Calvert Floral Co. 



Phc 



O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
e 1 7 Lake Forest, 111. 




The daily use ol 

KOSMEO CREAM 

and 

KOSMEO POWDER 

and a weeklu visit to 

Mrs. Graham's 
Deautij Shop 

1432 Stevens Bldg. 

will create a perfect 

complexion. 

TRY IT. 



Alumni Notes 

19 00. Prom a recent letter from 
Lincoln G. Dickey we extract the fol- 
lowing. "I met W. M. Lewis in 
Buffalo Sunday morning and we went 
together to Detroit to the U. S. and 
Allied Govts. War Exposition. Pos- 
sibly you did not know that I have 
been acting as program director for 
the exposition since early in Novem- 
ber and have had Lewis on the pro- 
gram in practically all of the cities. 
Just let me tell you for the Stentor 
or yourself that he is making better 
speeches these days than ever before." 

1908. Lincoln G. Dickey was elected 
on January 17 Secretary-Manager of 
the Cleveland Advertising Club, a very 
much alive organization with over 
800 members. His selection for the 
office grew out of his successful work 
as program director for the U. S. and 
Allied Govts. War Expositions in 
Cleveland, Detroit, Pittsburg, Cin- 
cinnati, and Boston; for this latter job 
he was qualified as general superin- 
tendent of the Coit-Albers Independ- 
ent Chautauquas, a position which he 
has held since he left the Redpath 
Bureau in 1915. 

1915. Ernest Moffett is still in France 
with Ordnance Detachment, Experi- 
mental Gas Field, A.E.F. 

1916. Cyrus H. Karraker's perfect- 
ly good application for assignment as 
a teacher in the Philippines was turn- 
ed down on account of his still ten- 
der years. He now hopes to attend 
Illinois University next year as a 
graduate student in History. 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Established 1S71 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 

73-75 W. South Water Street- 
Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



C. T. Gunn Co. 

Grocers 

Agency Huyler's Candies 

Curtice Bros. Goods LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Wh},? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 
O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



LflTRTJT CUV Successors 

.TYUrJIl.L^.rV I Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



139 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 



Dr. C. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a.m. to 1:00p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



£JLASS Pins and Rings. 
^~^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 
SPEISBROS. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



27 E. MONROE ST. 

CHICAGO 

III 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 



■Ill 

/^y For Light 

§ T /7 9 For Heat 
KJVI/*3 For Power 

North Shore Gas Co. 

nm 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusive 
Dry Goods Store 

9 




Dry Goods 



^/f Shop for 

'Womens ^Childrens Furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



1916. Lieut. Robert R. Maplesden 
has "signed up in the army of Swift 
& Co. in the produce department, ex- 
pecting after about two weeks train- 
ing in Chicago to be sent to one of 
the country produce plants in one of 
the Central States." He doesn't 
mind, provided it isn't Ottumwa. 

1916. Clarence Wetzel '16 has been 
advanced to Captaincy. He was re- 
commended for that commission 
several months ago, but has just re- 
ceived it. 

1919. Ensign Donald C. Woods is 
holding the fort in New York — ad- 
dress Pershing Club, 215 Manhattan 
Ave. — not sure whether he is to stay 
on in the Navy for the present or to 
be mustered out soon. "Fully ex- 
pect", he says, "to be back in Lake 
Forest next fall when college opens." 



(Continued from page 136.) 

The others which comprise our allot- 
ment are mainly English trucks. 
Ours is a very large park, but it is 
filled to the limit, almost, with work. 
It would seem that we are doomed 
until summer at least. We are sta- 
tioned just on the outskirts of the 
town and so far have been allowed 
liberty when not on duty. 

"One often wishes he had put a 
little more work on his French now 
that he is really in a position to use 
it and where one is frequently at a 
loss not to be able to "parler en 
francais". I'm thankful to "Little 
Van" however, for the smattering of 
French he was able to pour into me. 
It has saved the day more than once 
in dealings with the French in re- 
gard to motors. 

I sincerely hope that when school 
begins this fall I may re-enter at 
Lake Forest. 

Harry L. Pagett. 
M.T.C. 308, 
A.P.O. 731, 
A.E.F. France. 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

EXPR ESSM AN 

Special Attention Given to Students 

TELEPHONE/ Residence 675 
NUMBERS i Oftice 384 



Safe 




SPALDING 
BASE BALL EQUIPMENT 

Uniforms, Caps, Belts, Stockings, Shoes, 
Bats, Balls, Gloves, Masks, Etc 

Catalogue on request 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 
211-217 So. State St., Chicago. 111. 



Q, 



TheV^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsfyy 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision T)ealers 



Grocery Market 

807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 
Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



$74.^ takes beautiful new 

^ * $250.00 mahogany finish 

phonograph and records. Never used. 
60 inches high. Latest design. Will ship 
C. O. D. on approval. 

Mrs. Waverly Brown 

317 Greenleaf Ave., Wilmette, Illinois 



140 



THE STENTOR 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

A/LA.KE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C, the college work tor the rest of the 
year will be reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — will be 
continued for this year; consequently the second term will open on Tuesday.Jan. 7. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys,- opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSICS — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, 111. 



JENSEN &SUNDM ARK 

SHOES 

IV e Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 



C.G. Wenban & Son 
Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 
A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning ■ Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning- and Pressing 
Pressing .... 



$1.50 
.50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 

WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



Th 



J 



AMES MITCHELL 
E WELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m- 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Co. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



m 

M 



m 

Is 




The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, March 20, 1919. 



NUMBER 19 



Philosophy Club 
Meets in Lois Hall 

The girls of the Philosophy Club 
entertained the men of the club in the 
big room at Lois Durand Hall last 
Thursday evening. 

Sitting in front of the big roaring 
fire in the fireplace gave one such a 
comfortable, sleepy feeling it was al- 
most disastrous because it was not 
the proper atmosphere for very deep 
thinking on philosophical problems, 
which is our custom. 

The problem discussed was a vital 
one. The value of our four years of 
college work. Some good ideas both 
for and against the good of a college 
education were given by the mem- 
bers. 

Salad, sandwiches, and coffee were 
the reward for our great mental ac- 
tivity. 

Then Dr. Wright left us. We un- 
derstood that he confidently whisper- 
ed to another member of the faculty 
later in the evening that he expected 
us to "throw a dance" immediately 
upon his departure but we fooled him. 
For once we did the unusual thing 
and went home early. 



Mrs. Bridgman Speaks at 
Y. W. Meeting 

On Thursday evening of last week 
the Y.W.C.A. held its weekly meet- 
ing. There were about thirty girls 
present. Mrs. Bridgman gave a most 
interesting and helpful talk on dual 
selves. She said that everyone ex- 
perienced a struggle between the 
spiritual and the human self. Every- 
one has higher desires and impulses 
but somehow these are checked by 
something which is pleasant at the 
time but which, if not harmful, at 
least is of no benefit. 

All the girls felt the force of Mrs. 
Bridgman's understanding and sym- 
pathy. She impressed the fact that 
even the littlest things count in the 
building of character, and that great 
and wonderful accomplishments grow 



Second Family 
Dinner at 
Commons 

Dr. Hoff Addresses 
Students 

On Wednesday evening the second 
of this year's family dinners was 
given at the Calvin Durand Commons. 
Dr. Huff of Northwestern University 
was the speaker of the evening. He 
spoke on the ideal democracy and 
the gist of his address may be sum- 
med up in his closing words, "We do 
hot want a government like a circle 
with the state in the center. That 
would be an autocracy like Germany. 
Neither do we want a government 
like a circle with the individual in 
the center. That would be anarchy. 
An ideal government is like an eclipse 
— the two ends focus; one end is the 
individual, the other the state. Both 
state and individual can then develop 
without interfering with each others 
growth." 



Dr. Edwards Speaks 
in Chapel 

Dr. Edwards spoke in the College 
Chapel on Thursday morning. He 
emphasized the importance of prayer 
in our daily lives, and told of the 
great men of the present time who 
are concerned with international and 
national problems, and who devote 
some time each day to prayer for 
guidance in their work. It was a 
very helpful talk and we hope Dr. 
Edwards will speak to us again very 
soon. 



from small beginnings. Mrs. Bridg- 
man's splendid talk was encouraging 
and inspiring. The girls are most 
grateful to her for bringing them such 
a fine practical message. 



Freshman Dance 
Is Credit to Class 

On Friday evening, March four- 
teenth, the Freshman class gave the 
annual Freshman party at the Durand 
Art Institute. The success of the 
dance was due to the very able com- 
mittee consisting of Edith Wise, Lill- 
ian Stephans, Tom Birmingham, My- 
ron Thayer, and Leland Watson. 

In the receiving line were Profes- 
sor and Mrs. Van Steenderen, Miss 
Hamilton, Professor Sibley, Forence 
yan Steenderen, Bob Framberg, Helen 
Barnthouse, and Kenneth Nef. The 
Sigma Tau's very graciously left th« 
decorations from their dance the week 
before and this added a great deal to 
the dance. The music was furnished 
by a very good orchestra from Har- 
vey's. Punch was served during the 
evening. 

From the way the Freshman class 
has started on its social career it 
promises to be one of the best classes 
ever. We are all strong for the 
"Frosh." Here's to you! Keep up 
the good work! 



Francis Miller at 
Ft. Sheridan 

Lieut. Francis Miller, ex '19, who 
was seriously wounded some time ago 
has just been sent to the Base Hos- 
pital at Fort Sheridan. This gives 
his many Lake Forest friends an op- 
portunity to visit him. Lieut. Mil- 
ler's address is Base Hospital, 28, 
Ward 33, Room 88, Fort Sheridan, 
Illinois. 



Horace and Margaret Horton en- 
joyed a visit from their father and 
brother last week end. 



Ruth Kenyon entertained Eunice 
Getzelman of Northwestern over the 
week end. 



Margaret Horton had as her guest 
Talitah Gerlach last week end. 



142 



THE STENTOR 



Tom, Dick and Harry 



- Wanted — a bright, energetic assistant 
to help round up Stentor Contri- 
butions. Do not apply if you are 
afraid of work. Ruth Stommel. 



For Sale — My interest in my studies. 
Please apply in person to Jack Rees. 



Notice — After Spring vacation the 
Dean wishes to announce that she 
will daily auction off a door-key to 
the highest bidder. For use one 
night only. Come early and get your 
key. 



We have at hand an anonymous in- 
quiry as to why" it is that the men 
always exhibit such enthusiasm when 
an Open House is announced in Lois 
Durand Hall. We regret to say that 
at present we are unable to answer 
this baffling question, but we have 
put two of our best sleuths to work 
on the case and hope soon to be able 
to divulge the cause to the anxious 
inquirer. 



Help Wanted — Some one to help me 
answer my telephone calls. 

Peg Horton. 



For Sale — Freshman poetry at the 
rate of 15c per line, blank verse, 25c 
for rhyming verses. 

Sarah Moore. 



If you have on hand any infor- 
mation of value to this column, snap- 
shots, portraits, or sketches, do not 
hesitate to send them in. We will 
pay for cost of transportation if neces- 
sary. — Editor. 



lvlrs. Mann of Washington visited 
her sister Flora Shattuck several days 
last week. 



Tragedy — 

She stubbed her heel on the top of 
the stairs and cracked her head on 
the foot. Kindly omit flowers! 



Lillian Stephens and Irene Far- 
well have recovered from their short 
illness. 



The Treachery of Tomtucker, 
the Philistine 



And it came to pass in the days 
when there was great distress in the 
land because of the mighty inquisi- 
tions that were being made concern- 
ing the knowledge and understanding 
of the people, that there was a dearth 
of news. And the Chief Scribe arose 
and said, "Let messengers go forth un- 
to the uttermost parts of the campus 
and bid all the lesser Scribes gather 
tidings concerning the acts of the 
Philistines." 

Now among the Philistines there 
was a fair youth of much learning. 
And this youth did often write con- 
cerning the gods worshipped by these 
Philistines, and also of the strange 
feast days which in their tongue are 
called "Y.M.C.A. Meetings." And so 
even as before this youth was in- 
structed to write concerning the last 
feast; and verily he did smile with 
great grace and answered smoothly, 
"Truly, it shall be done!" 

And in due time the appointed 
day arrived whereon all the Scribes 
did bring their offerings to the Chief 
Scribe. But the young Philistine 
brought not his offering with the rest. 
And the youth was asked, "Why 
broughtest thou not thy offering?" 
and he replied, "Verily, before the 
seventh hour dawns on the morrow it 
shall be brought!" And the Chief 
Scribe said, "So be it!" 

Now when the morrow was come, 
at the seventh hour, the Chief Scribe 
asked, "Has the offering been 
brought?"; and the answer was 
"Nay!" And likewise at the eighth 
hour the answer was the same, and 
so also at the ninth and tenth hours. 
Then was there great anger among 
all the Scribes, and they said, "Is it 
just that we should bring offerings 
and this idolator should escape?" 
And the face of the Chief Scribe 
darkened with wrath, for news was 
not abundant, and there was much 
space to be filled. 

And behold, just as the eleventh 
hour was striking the young Philistine 
did pass by the door where the Chief 
Scribe tarried. And the Scribe said 
with great sternness, "Why hast thou 
not done as thou promised?" 

Then did the young Philistine as- 
sume a countenance of great in- 
nocency, and he did say with much 
dissimulation, "Verily this is strange! 
Behold I did lie awake the whole 
night so that the seventh hour might 
find me ready, and when the seventh 
hour dawned I did hie me forth to 
i the temple and did place my offering 



beneath the gate which was locked. 
Why then sayest thou, 'Where is thy 
offering?' " 

Then did the Chief Scribe ask the 
Keeper of the Gate concerning the 
matter. And the Keeper replied, "Be- 
hold the gate was opened at the sixth 
hour, for lo many maidens did go 
forth to walk in the morning sun- 
light, and they are witnesses that 
what I speak is true!" 

Then did the Chief Scribe believe 
the Keeper of the Gate and he did 
say, "Verily the young Philistine was 
not here! Behold the proof of his 
iniquity." And a decree went forth 
that no man should put confidence in 
the words of the Philistines for be- 
hold that nation is a nation of evil 
doers and is an abomination unto the 
Lord. 



Party Given in 
Honor of Lois Ryno 

Dr. and Mrs. Allee gave a very de- 
lightful farewell party for Lois Ryno 
last Saturday evening. Since it was 
so near St. Patrick's Day, green was 
the color scheme. The girls made 
caps of green crepe paper for the 
men; in return the men made green 
aprons for the girls and behold a 
dressmaker was found in our midst, — 
Horace Horton put an honest to good- 
ness pocket on his apron. Even the 
delicious refreshments were in honor 
of St. Patrick. The pretty little 
shamrock cakes with green icing de- 
lighted everyone. 

The men drew pictures of pigs; 
and such pigs that were drawn. 
Some were fat and others lean, some 
were long and others short; some one 
remarked that one looked like a deer 
— it certainly did have a dear face. 
Each of the girls was asked to choose 
one of the pigs, and the man who be- 
longed to it became her first partner 
for five hundred. 

The following is just an aside: 

Lois Hall was a busy place just be- 
fore the party. The girls heard, 
probably the ouija board told them, 
chat five hundred was to be played, 
so the fifteen minutes before they 
left the Hall for Allee's, were spent 
in learning this game. 

Well, it paid to cram, for when 
the awards were given, Hazel Seguin 
carried away the first prize and Mar- 
garet Horton the booby. Both prizes 



THE STENTOR 



143 



Music School Notes 

The Ferry Hall Seniors and Miss 
Brown are to be congratulated on the 
success of the play "A Curious Mis- 
hap" which they presented on Satur- 
day evening. The staging and cos- 
tumes were very pretty and the parts 
were well taken. Helen Varney was 
especially good in the role of Phili- 
bert, a rich merchant. 



Francelia Smith is the proud pos- 
sessor of a new Lyon and Healy harp. 
Smithy spends all her time this week 
in practice. 



Wanted — a boat for transportation 
to meals. 



One of the teachers in speaking of 
Peace Day Celebration — "Don't you 
remember we had dinner at 'Chu 
Chin Chow?' " (meaning King Joy 
Los'.) 



Miss Margaret Colton spent last 
week-end with friends in the city. 



"When it comes to poor writing, 
the ministers and lawyers do not 
stand entirely alone," said Dr. Hutch- 
ins. "I recall Billy, a small Sunday- 
school pupil of mine, whose grand- 
mother gave him $10 on his birthday. 
Billy took it to the bank and re- 
ceived the customary bank book in 
which the cashier made the entry — 
By cash — $10. A day or so later, 
Billy saw his grandmother and in 
thanking her said — "I was awful sur- 
prised when you gave me so much 
money, and the man at the bank was 
too, cause he wrote in my book 'By 
gosh — $10.' " 



Lake Forest Wins From Naperville 



Score 26 to 36 



IT happened 

IN exam week 

THAT we 

PLAYED 

NORTHWESTERN 

COLLEGE, from 

NAPERVILLE. 

YOU know Naperville? 

WELL it was 

SOME game! 

THEY had a fat 

MAN that was 

BIG, and a skinny man 

THAT was tall, and 

WE had a lot of 

PEP; 

AND 

IT was some game! 

WE wish we 

COULD tell you about it. 

BUT 

OUR athletic reporter 

GOT lost 

BETWEEN the South Campus 

AND Lois Hall. 

NO one can find him. 

WE fear 

THE worst, but 

HOPE 

FOR the best. - 

NOW we have 

WRITTEN up dances 

WHICH we 

DID not attend, 

Y. W. C. A. Meetings 

FROM which we 

WERE absent, 

AND Family dinners 

WE did not 

EAT. 

BUT a game is too 

DEEP for us, 

EVEN if we were 



were masterpieces of the eminent 
animal painter, Master Warden Clyde 
Allee. Harriet Harris, it is said, with 
her three years of Biology, was un- 
able to recognize the animals painted. 
This is probably just a rumor, how- 
ever, for they were camels, and Dr. 
Allee told his class last year, the 
number of cells in their stomachs. 



Sigma Tau entertained Dorothy 
Dobbin ex. '18 and Madeline Hoover 
ex. '21 over the week end. 



Sarah Moore entertained Mildred 
Yale of Ferry Hall, Sunday at Lois 
Hall. 



THERE. 

SO all 

\YE can say 

IS 

LAKE FOREST 

WON 

3 6 to 2 6. 

AND 

IT 

WAS 

SOME 

GAME!!! 




Dependability— 

As to the length of life and 
resiliency of the fabrics, and 
as to the construction of your 
clothes — 

Is What Counts 

That's why we put all our 
knowledge into buying the 
RIGHT SORT OF FAB- 
RIC — 

Fabrics of the finest textures 
and of the latest weaves — 
That's why we devote our ut- 
most skill in tailoring — 
so as to express gracefully, 
the lines of your figure — 
so that the clothes will retain 
that Air of Distinction which 
is soon lost in less perfect 
clothes. 

THESE are the qualities that 
make JERREMS' clothes so 
desirable — so dependable. 



Prices $40, $45, $50 
and upwards 




Tailor for Young Men 

Three Stores: 

7 North La Salle St. 

314 S. Michigan Ave. 

7 I E. Monroe St. 



144 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 
Board of Editors: 

Lillian Evans, '19. 

Harriet Harris, '19. 

Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 

Lydia Sprecher, '19. 

Ruth Stommel, '19. 

Mildred Zenos, '19. 

Lawrence Maplesden, '21. 

Eleanor Goble, '21. 
Business Managers: 

Agnes Hoffman, '19. 

Margaret Horton, '19. 
Reporters: 

Sara Moore, '21. 

Paul Offenheiser, '21. 

Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 

Horace Horton, '20. 

Howard Wood, '22. v 

Professor W. R. Bridgeman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Kntered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est. Illinois, as second-class matter. 



supposed, they were not .concerning 
Lake Forest, but an eastern college 
two or three centuries ago. Incident- 
ally, considering the manner in which 
students have been known to crab 
about college food, one might have 
inferred that it was a very new and 
original note, but there seems to have 
been some dissatisfaction in regard 
to the same subject even in those 
glorious days back in the 18th cen- 
tury. 

In a word, this talk has furnished 
every student in the college with some 
good sound talking points in favor of 
Lake Forest. Now as we return to 
the home town for a glorious ten 
days of rest, let's boost the Alma 
Mater because we know it offers every 
bit as good opportunities as any in- 
stitution in the middle west, and may- 
be a little bit better. 



Jen and Mary 

Flunk me not, O gentle teacher 

Hear my humble cry 

While the others thou art flunking 

Do thou pass me by. 

Teacher, teacher, watch my pencil fly 

When the papers thou art grading 

Just let mine slip by. Amen. 



Bright Remarks of the Faculty 

Sib — "Now, children, why did Mrs. 
Browning call her poems 'Sonnets 
from the Portuguese'? Was she a 
Portugoose?" 

Trouty — (speaking of non-campus 
love affairs) "Br-r-r — those Icelandic 
affections!" 



ABOUT this time of the year, 
just before spring vacation, we 
are apt to be exposed to talks 
and lectures on college loyalty with a 
view to urging a prospective student 
campaign. If these different forms 
of "pep" talks are effective, they 
probably start the students off toward 
home with a hazy intention to boost 
for Lake Forest, not because they 
know or realize its standing among 
other colleges and universities in this 
region, but rather with a spirit of 
"My college right or wrong, yet my 
college." 

In a recent chapel talk an alto- 
gether different line of argument was 
introduced which made an unusually 
good impression on the students. Dif- 
ferent deplorable conditions were de- 
scribed as occurring in a certain mid- 
dle western institution which no one 
could help but recognize as being 
his own alma mater, but everyone 
was startled and surprised to learn 
in each case described that it was not 
Lake Forest but perhaps a nearby 
university or a college in a neighbor- 
ing state. After several examples of 
this kind which appeared for all the 
world like an exaggerated and pessim- 
istic account of conditions in Lake 
Forest, the speaker read extracts from 
faculty meetings. As might have been 



ND where we love is home, 
home that our feet may leave, 
but not our hearts. The chain 
may lengthen but it never parts." — 
Holmes. 

"Home!" For many of us that is 
the watchword, especially these last 
few days, when we are struggling 
with those dreaded exams. Home is 
the refuge and the reward at the end 
of this quarter's quest for knowledge, 
and we are eager to close our books 
that we may arrive there the sooner. 
Let us then do our best these last 
days to make the last lap of the race 
the most successful, so we may be 
worthy of the reward at the end, and 
so that when we feel vacation's free- 
dom we can take a deep breath and 
not only say with ease, "I passed!" 
but feel with satisfaction that we 
more than "passed." What a joy 
that will be to the home people! Just 
now let us keep before us as our goal 
the picture of home, our greatest in- 
spiration. Then, when the picture 
grows brighter and becomes a reality, 
let us carry with us the picture of an- 
other home, Lake Forest College, our 
Alma Mater, and all the comrades 
who have made it happy — for "where 
we love is home." Happy vacation! 



House Committee Appointed 

The following people have been ap- 
pointed to house-committee for the 
spring quarter, — G. Massey, H. Har- 
ris, J. Martin, M. Preston, G. Higbee 
E. Wise, H. Barnthouse, S. Fisher. 



Lois Ryno highly recommends 
Webster's New International Edition 
of the Bible. It is especially adapted 
she says for Y.W.C.A. meetings. 



And the Birdies Sang — Tweet-tweet! 

You may not helieve Jn Signs of 
spring, but what else could it be that 
made — (yes, girls it's all true, we had 
it on good authority) Gomer Bath — 
our Gomer — spend three hours and 
twenty-three minutes talking long 
distance to a young woman whom he 
had never seen? And he was such a 
nice boy, too! 



Girls have you got the new house- 
committee paid off? 



Attention! 

Each and every one of you who 
has failed to make the great T. D. & 
H. column is cordially invited to en- 
ter our Spring Poetry Contest. We 
ain't proud- — we read 'em all! And 
you may be one of the lucky ones. 



Agnes Hoffman entertained 
sister Julia this week. 



her 



Oh, ho, hum 
Give us some 
Sleep! This bum 
Life of hum — 
Ble and dumb 
Burdensome 
Troublesome 
Martyrdom 
Of work encum- 
Bers my crumb — 
Y soul — Dumn! 
Gimme a bomb! 



Bright Saying of the Prosh 
Becky Sharp was the wife of Enoch 
Arden in one of Browning's poems. 



THE STENTOR 



145 



Alumni Notes 

1896. The present address of Miss 
Katherine Kenaga, still teaching in 
the Pasedena High School, is 38 Mar- 
ion St., Pasadena, Calif. 

1910. Edwin J. Mather has been ap- 
pointed athletic director at the Uni- 
versity of Arkansas, Payetteville, and 
leaves for there this week. We hope 
for more particulars later. 

1912. Lieut. Joe L. Thomas, who 
has just been discharged from ser- 
vice, was on the campus last week. 
He is ready now to take up his work 
in landscape architecture, in which 
he was graduated at the University of 
Illinois in 1917, and will probably 
locate in or near Chicago. 

After his preliminary work in the 
second officers' training camp at Port 
Sheridan, where he was commission- 
ed, and at Fort Monroe with the 
heavy artillery, he sailed for France 
in December, '17. He saw service 
with the Fourth French Army in the 
Champagne April 15 to Sept. 22, 
1918, and with the American Army 
in the Argonne until the armistice. 
He was promoted to a First Lieuten- 
ancy, and also recommended for a 
captaincy just too late for the com- 
mission to come through before Nov- 
ember 11th. He was also awarded 
the Croix de Guerre July 18, 1918; we 
hope some friends will tell us what 
for, for he won't. 

1915. W. G. Brombacher's present 
address is 3917 Livingston St., N. W., 



Washington, D. C. He has been out 
of the Army since December but is 
still at the Bureau of Standards. He 
has recently spent some time in New 
York, representing his Division at the 
Aeronautic Exposition. 

1915. Ernest Krueger has been ask- 
ed to report to the Brooklyn National 
League Club on March 19 at Jack- 
sonville, Florida. 

1916. Lieut. Elrick B. Davis is still 
at Camp Devens, Mass., with the 36th 
Infantry. 



The present address of Professor 
and Mrs. Burnap is 29 West Victoria 
St., Santa Barbara, Calif. They re- 
port abundant hospitality on the part 
of Lake Forest people residing there 
and increasing benefit from the vaca- 
tion. Mr. Burnap now definitely ex- 
pects to return next year, and has 
sent word to that effect. 



Mrs. Halsey and Miss Katherine 
have returned to Lake Forest and re- 
opened the house. 



Christmas Eve on the 
Rhine 

Christmas Eve on the Rhine. — 
(A continuation of the most interest- 
ing journal-letter from Harlan G. 
Kauffman '12.) 

"Well, Xmas Eve, and Xmas Eve in 
Germany proved very interesting, 
much more so than had I been with 
the regiment. I wrote a letter after 
supper, and to whom do you think? — 



Starting out for a couple of pages in 
extremely broken German, telling her 
where I was, etc. Then about eight 
o'clock the family opened the dining 
room doors and disclosed a really 
corking Xmas tree, and invited the 
few of us who were there to gather 
around the piano and sing Xmas 
hymns. The young daughter, about 
15, played well and talked pretty fair 
English (learned it in school), and 
we all enjoyed it a lot. Then they 
had a big basket of the animal cook- 
ies, too. It was all so homelike and 
happy and sort of familyfied — really 
expressed Xmas, one felt. Again in 
an enemy country! About ten o'clock, 
as I was climbing into bed, a lieuten- 
ant from the 51st Pioneers happened 
along and told me that Bully Hunt 
and the 2nd Battalion of the 51st 
was up the river, or rather down the 
river, at Treis, and that Billy was 
giving 'em a dinner party. That was 
the first news I'd had of Hunt since 
I'd been over, and as we were pretty 
good old friends, I decided that 15 
miles was nothing even if I were 
tired, so I dressed, woke up Paul 
Pray, my favorite driver, and down 
the river we went. I left the truck, 
crossed the pontoon bridge at Treis 
and finally found Hunt. We had a 
good visit, you know how good it is 
to see old friends like that over here, 
especially so unexpectedly and on 
Xmas Eve. But that night the eight 
inches of snow came down, and from 
then on we had a perfect devil of a 
time. We had to climb a six kilo- 
metre hill first thing out of Cochem, 




The Original 

"Mable Sykes" 

DIAMOND MEDAL -:- ARTIST -:- PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 

140 North State Street 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts. ) 

Established at present location since 1906 
MAKER OF HY-CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 
Phone Central 5341 



146 



THE STENTOR 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



use BOWMAN'S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Holland Park 9 101-109 Vine Ave 



The 
Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 1 7 Lake Forest, 111. 




The daih) use of 

KOSMEO CREAM 

ana 

KOSMEO POWDER 

and a weekly visit to 

Mrs. Graham's 
Deauttj Shop 

1432 Stevens Bldg. 

will create a perfect 

complexion. 

TRY IT. 



and I never saw a more slippery road 
in my life. We were short of chains, 
but by a miracle a big caterpillar 
came along, we hooked the seven 
trucks together and he pulled the 
whole string to the top. From then 
on we crawled. We agreed after- 
wards that we wouldn't have missed 
that way for the world, however, — 
great sombre valleys and the densest 
forests of evergreen covered and hung 
with snow, glimpses of the river now 
and then with an occasional old cas- 
tle turret showing through from its 
banks, villages down in pockets in 
the valleys with sometimes nothing 
showing from the road save a blue- 
black slate spire pointing up — a very 
wonderful day, all in all. I take back 
most of what I said about not liking 
the country, in my letter from Phal- 
zel. It was most unattractive down 
there, but I hadn't seen enough to 
say. A wonderful day, but evening 
found us still on the road, with noth- 
ing to eat, not a bite since morning, 
and the worst hill it seems to me I 
ever saw, to descend, and then an- 
other equally steep and slippery to go 
up. We took the trucks one at a 
time, had everybody get out but the 
driver (they were 'only too glad to). 
We found 40 tire chains in three 
abandoned Quads (American mile- 
posts) and put them on, half way 
down brakes, low gear and all availed 
nothing, you simply had to let her go 
and trust in God to keep you on the 
road and around the curve at the bot- 
tom. All made it but Grady, my big 
Pittsburg former policeman. He lost 
control and jumped, the car shot for 
the edge and somehow or other hung 
up, the front wheels catching on a 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Established 1871 



Geo. Midden dorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 
73-75 W. South Water Street 

Telephone Randolph 1860 

CHICAGO 



C. T. Gunn Co. 
Grocers 

Agency Huyler's Candies 

Curtice Bros. Goods LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Why,? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill'* Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



KUBELSKY t& 



sor to 
rry Levin 



Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



147 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 



Dr. C. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



£JLASS Pins and Rings. 

^""^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 

GDCIC m?4~kC 27 E. MONROE ST. 

air jus hkus. Chicago 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave. .Highland Park, 111. 



/""> For Light 

i T fl Q For Heat 
KJW*J for power 

North Shore Gas Co. 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusive 
Dry Goods Store 




Dry Goods 



^yfShopfor 
'Womens&Xhildrens Furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



couple of saplings right on the brink 
of the 200 foot drop. While we were 
working to get him out, in the dark, 
a big Cadillac limousine started to 
come down, lost control just above 
us, the Colonel in it jumped, the 
driver got out somehow, and the car 
caught in some soft dirt near the 
edge, sufficiently to slew it around to 
safety. It struck one of my men and 
broke his leg, but. we figured on the 
whole we were all fairly lucky. Then 
we couldn't get one of the trucks up 
the next hill, it was 10:30, and we'd 
been working pretty hard all day 
without food, so I went on to the next 
village and got some billets and we 
all turned in, hungry and with feet 
soaking wet: Such was our Xmas, 
1919! And we had so planned on 
being home for Xmas, after 11 days 
on the road. But the bunch was sure 
game, they never groused a bit, not 
one of them. They all said, "Be- 
lieve us, we'll always remember this 
Xmas, if no other." The next morn- 
ing we managed to get the cripple 
out, and pulled in to the regiment 
about supper time, at Winnigen, a 
small suburb of Coblenz, a little up 
the river, — to find waiting: pay for 
the men, Xmas boxes, a Xmas issue 
to the men of cookies, chocolate, 
cigars and cigarettes, and best of all, 
MAIL. The first mail since we'd left 
the Argonne, six weeks before, and it 
sure did look good. So we had our 
Xmas one day late, with a regular 
bath for once in a regular bath tub. 
34 letters was my portion, a Xmas 
box from you, a lot of interesting 
clippings about things I wanted to 
know (I saw two newspapers in Dec- 
ember, the 3rd and 21st), a Novem- 
ber "Atlantic Monthly", some "Tri- 
bunes", and a bundle of French 
papers.) There were many clippings 
about how the good old U.S.A. cele- 
brated the news of the armistice, par- 
ticularly N. Y. and Chicago. Rather 
made one feel like staying over here. 
I thought they said the sacrifices of 
war were going to improve the w. k. 
human race, elevate it a trifle. Seems 
to me they might have done a little 
better." 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

EXPRESSMAN 

Special Attention Given to Students 



TELEPHONE I 
NUMBERS i 



Residence 675 
Office 384 



<$>«><SxMxsxS>SxS><SkS><SxJxS*SxS^^ 



Safe 







SPALDING 
BASE BALL EQUIPMENT 

Uniforms, Caps, Belts. Stockings, Shoes, 
Bats, Balls, Gloves, Masks, Etc. 

Catalogue on request 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 
211-217 So. State St., Chicago. 111. 



Thev^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Vesehky 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision 'Dealers 



Grocery Market 

807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 

Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



$74 00 takes beautiful new 

*P* '• $250.00 mahogany finish 

phonograph and records. Never used. 
60 inches high. Latest design. Will ship 
C. O. D. on approval. 

Mrs. Waverly Brown 
317 Greenleaf Ave., Wilmette, Illinoii 



148 



THE STBNTOR 



■■I! 



ffliiiiiffliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniBiiiiiii 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C, the college work for the rest of the 
year will be reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — will be 
continued for this year; consequently the second term will open on Tuesday, Jan. 7. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 




Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1868. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, 111. 



illlliilllllilHllllllllllll 



JENSEN &SUNDM ARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 
Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 

C. G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing ■ Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning and Pressing . . $1.50 

Pressing ... . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 



At 



French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 

WAUKEGAN 



Phone 2252 



r AMES MITCHELL 
IEWELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 






The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Go. 

Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 

Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 




The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, APRIL 4, 1919. 



NUMBER 1W 



A Visit with 

Lieut. Miller,'19 

Lieut. Francis Miller of the class 
of '19 was reported to be in the hos- 
pital at Fort Sheridan in the last 
number of the Stentor and since then 
many of his friends have visited him 
so that we can give a fuller account 
of his condition. After some inten- 
sive questioning we learned that he 
went through the fighting in the St. 
Mihiel drive without a scratch but 
was wounded on the fourth day of 
the drive in the Argonne. The upper 
part of his right leg was shattered by 
five machine gun bullets of 'the ex- 
plosive variety generally used in 
aerial defense for bursting gas bags. 
That they are equally effective 
against human beings none can deny 
after talking with Francis. He had 
an operation in France but at the end 
of five months showed no improve- 
ment so was sent to Fort Sheridan 
and had to undergo another operation 
which shows all the signs of being 
successful although it will confine 
him to his bed for another five 
months. 

Above all things Miller is cheerful 
as he can be in spite of his misfortune 
and his only regret is that if he had 
to be wounded he wished that he 
might have seen more of the Argonne 
before the Huns got his range instead 
of being picked off almost at the be- 
ginning of that engagement. He is a 
true Lake Forest hero and appreciates 
nothing more than visits from Lake 
Forest friends who can tell him of his 
old school and help him pass some of 
the months he will have to be at the 
Fort. We certainly hope that this 
new operation will prove successful so 
that Francis may be back on the 
campus with us again next fall and 
he intends to do that very thing if his 
condition will permit. He says he 
can't get back to L. F. too soon. 
That's the pep. We're for you, 
Francis! 



Basket Ball Monograms Awarded 



The Quarterly Report Cards will be 
ready for distribution next Monday. 
Write to the home folks now! 

■'■'"'' ' . 



TEAM DOES GOOD WORK IN SPITE 
OE LATE START. 

Starting late and working under 
various other handicaps, the basket 
ball team this year is deserving of 
nothing but praise. They not only 
played hard and faithfully, but show- 
ed the good old Lake Forest spirit of 
former years, and crabbed very little 
about things and conditions that 
might well have given them cause for 
so doing. Their position of runners 
up in the percentage column shows 
that the class of basket ball they 
played was of the usual high type of 
previous Red and Black basket ball 
teams. Starting the season by losing 
a hard iuck game to Beloit by one 
point and that made by a wild last- 
second heave from the center of the 
.loor, they followed it up by beating 
the scrappy Monmouth team by a de- 
cisive score. The following Monday 
the hard luck jinx again beat them by 
a final minute basket by a Knox 
shooter from the center of the floor. 
This was the best game played on the 
home floor. The next game played 
was against Chicago University at 
Bartlett gymnasium. Handicapped by 
a long floor and the gigantic size of 
their opponents the boys put up a 
plucky battle and were only defeated 
by a very small margin. Y.M.C.A. 
College went down before some well 
directed team work and effective bas- 
ket shooting by one basket lead. 
Northwestern College at Naperville 
followed in the steps of Y.M.C.A. 
College and the boys were ready for 
the down state trip. Here the dope 
was reversed and instead of beating 
Monmouth, they were handed the lit- 
tle end of the score, and then went 
aver with a crippled team and took a 
fall out of the fast Knox team. This 
victory brought the end of the season 
with Beloit and Lake Forest running 
for first place. Beloit cinched the 
title by beating the boys on Beloit's 
floor by a score of 16 to 8, after a 
hard, scrappy battle. 

The personnel of the team, due to 
injuries was changed somewhat as 
the season progressed, but the mono- 



gram was awarded to the following 
men: 

CAPTAIN JACK REES 

Happy Jack played his last game : 
of basket ball for Lake Forest against- 
Beloit. His team lost, but Jack con- 
sistently outplayed his man as he did 
in every other game of the season. 
He was a good leader and a strong 
guard, always grinning when his op-j 
ponent started roughing it, for Jack, 
always knew what was coming to that \ 
opponent sooner or later. 

KEITH MARSH 

Keith came into the game, out of 
the navy, after the season had started 
md immediately became a valuable 
asset. He played out of his regular 
position, but seemed right at home 
jnder the basket as previously at cen- 
ter. His floor work was always good, 
and the book generally showed a 
goodly share of points to his favor. 
Two more years to play. 

STEWART EDDY 

Eddy was the chief point maker of 
the team, and could always be count- 
ed on to deliver his best in each 
game played. His dodging, whirling, 
method of advancing the ball was the 
despair ot opposing guards, while his 
eye on free throws and field shots was 
ieadly. His best game was played 
against Knox. Two more years. 

NED MAC CORMACK 

Ned was undeniably the best cen- 
ter in the conference any other opin- 
ions to the contrary. His previous 
experience as a guard coupled with 
his ability to jump and shoot "baskets 
in addition to his speedy and accurate 
passing made him an invaluable man 
to the team. While not always in 
the pink of physical condition, he 
managed to outplay any man pitted 
against him, not excepting the lanky 
Chicago University, center. Two more 
years. 

(Cont. on next page) 



150 



THE STENTOR 



Basket Ball Monograms Awarded 

(Continued from first page) 



LAWRENCE MAPLESDEN 

"Minsk" is probably the scrappiest 
130 lb. combination of legs and arms 
ever assembled. Handicapped the 
season long by a game leg, he always 
gave the very best account of himself, 
and managed to hold more than his 
own in every game played. His head 
was working all the time, and he thus 
managed to offset his physical dis- 
ability many times. What "Minsk" 
has to learn about guarding won't fill 
any very large book. Two more 
years. 

HALSTEAD SCHICK 

"Diz" learned his basket ball at 
Ottumwa, and learned it pretty well. 
He made a strong, scrappy substitute 
at guard, playing his best game at 
Y.M.C.A. College. He's got the old 
fight, and with three more years to 
go will be an Al man before he gets 
through. 

GORDON SUMNER 

Forced to quit the game early in 
the season because of varicose veins 
in his less, Dooley was a decided loss. 
His knowledge of the game, and his 
inexhaustible "pep" made him a very 
important cog in the basket ball ma- 
chine. He came out for the last game 
of the season, and showed by his few 
minutes of playing what a loss the 
team had suffered by his disability. 
Two more years. 

Davy Rees, Beddoes, Kunz and 
Thayer, and all the other 
boys who so consistently came 
out to give the first team practice 
are deserving of much credit and 
should share any of the praise that 
goes to the five representing the col- 
lege this year, for it is only through 
such cooperation that a team can pos- 
sibly be developed. Davy Rees, es- 
pecially, should be voted the privilege 
of wearing the colors. His continued 
faithfulness is a shining example of 
the true meaning of college loyalty. 



Lake Forest. .23 


Beloit 


24 


" 


. .34 


Monmouth . . 


.15 


" 


. .28 




.30 


" 


. .16 


U. of Chicago. 


.23 


" 


. .24 


Y.M.C.A. Coll. 


23 


" 


. .20 


Monmouth . . 


.31 


" 


. .23 


Knox 


IS 


" 


. .18 


Northwestern 


.15 


" 


. . 8 


Beloit 


.16 


ii 


. .36 


Northwestern 


.26 



The standing of the teams in the 
Little Five Conference is as follows: 

Teams W L Pet. 

Beloit 6 1.000 

Knox 5 3 .625 

Lake Forest 4 4 .500 

Northwestern ... .|. ... 2 4 .333 
Monmouth 1 7 .125 

COACH MATHER 

To the Coach, due credit must be 
given, when you consider that basket 
ball was not Charley's game in col- 
lege and that he never coached a 
basket ball team before. Many times 
during the season, Charley's strategy 
was shown, and his ability to estimate 
the strength of his opponents never 
failed. Coach Mather overcame many 
difficulties in the conditions he had 
to meet on the campus and his "rep" 
as a "good fellow" made him ace high 
with the team on its trips. 



Personals 

Irene and Zelma Farwell spent the 
week end with Josephine Martin. 
They also visited Helen Cushing Hel- 
frich in Chicago. 



Mildred Zenos who completed her 
college course last quarter visited 
Theta Psi this week. 



Lois Ryno is teaching in Canton, 
Illinois this quarter. She expects to 
return to Lake Forest next year. 



Professor Sibley and Dr. Allee 
spent part of the vacation on a walk- 
ing trip through the Indiana Sand 
Dunes. 



Eloise Brown spent the week with 
her family in New Orleans. 



Horace Horton visited in Harvey, 
Illinois several days last week. 



Mr. Troutman spent part of the 
vacation with Paul Offenheiser at 
Freeport. 



Mildred Gerlach and Sara Moore 
have joined the choir. 



Anne Merner visited her family in 
New York during vacation. 



Ruth Bahlert spent Spring vaca- 
tion with Margaret Schwittay in Glen 
Ellyn. 



Dr. Allee Attends 
Little Five 

Conference 

BELOIT VOTED CHAMPIONSHIP 

The postponed Christmas meeting 
of the Little Five Conference was 
held Saturday, March 29th in the City 
Club. Professor E. S. Ames of Beloit 
was elected President. Professor B. 
H. Graves of Knox was elected Secre- 
tary, and Professor Dommof North- 
western College, Treasurer. 

Beloit was voted a championship 
banner for Basketball. The annual 
Little Five track meet was set for 
Northwestern College at Naperville 
on May 24th. The other four col- 
leges are to be represented by full 
teams, but Lake Forest will probably 
have few entries. The Little Five 
tennis tournament will be held at the 
same time. Lake Forest will enter a 
team in that. In spite of the increas- 
ed cost, the usual medals for point 
winners will be given and there will 
be banners for the teams winning the 
relay and the winners in tennis. For 
the first time, the relay race will 
count towards winning the meet as 
any other event. 

I OOTBALL SCHEDULE ARRANGED 

The football schedule for next fall 
was arranged and Lake Forest will 
play Monmouth at Lake Forest on 
October 25th, Beloit at Lake Forest 
on November 1st, Knox at Knox on 
November Sth, and North-Western at 
Lake Forest on November 15th. It is 
the plan to secure a light game early 
in the season before the annual game 
with Northwestern University. There 
will be at least five games near 
enough for Lake Forest students to 
attend. 

BASEBALL OUTLOOK UNCERTAIN 

The other Little Five colleges, with 
the exception of Beloit are supporting 
baseball teams, but Lake Forest does 
not plan any except Northwestern on 
account of the expense. This makes 
it improbable that any baseball cham- 
pionship can be decided. 

The personnel of the Little Five 
Conference has entirely changed in 
the last three years. In point of ser- 
vice, the Lake Forest representative, 
Professor Allee, was the oldest mem- 
ber present, and the only one who 
had attended more than one previous 
meeting of the board. 



THE STENTOR 



151 



College Men Lose 
Friend 

Study Hall is no more! The win- 
ter months have been a severe strain 
on the popular old gentleman's health 
and the balmy spring breezes com- 
pleted the work of devastation. Al- 
though deep regret was audibly ex- 
pressed in chapel at the announce- 
ment of his demise, it is thought that 
sorrow will not be allowed to inter- 
fere with the usual spring festivities. 
Next fall will no doubt witness his 
revivication and it is thought any 
prolonged period of depression would 
be unwise. 

The coroner's verdict rendered at 
the autopsy was that the cessation of 
vitality was due to mosquitos and 
other small deer which infest the li- 
brary where the deceased was wont to 
reside. 



Mr. Troutman Coaches 
Play 

Professor W. C. Troutman spent 
part of his vacation down at the 
University of Illinois coaching a play. 
In the annual contest among the 
twenty-one fraternities down there 
Mr. Troutman's fraternity had had its 
play chosen in tha list of the best 
seven. After a week of coaching by 
Mr. Troutman it was awarded first 
place when the play was presented 
last night. 



Track Manager Elected 

At a meeting of the Athletic Asso- 
ciation last Thursday morning, Luc- 
ius Legner was elected Track Mana- 
ger. 

Lieut. Davis Back at School 

Lieutenant Chester R. Davis has 
returned to school. William Teeves 
who has been in the navy is also re- 
turning this quarter. Both will grad- 
uate with the (lass of 1919. 



Rho Gamma held first and thirty- 
third degree initiations at The Hotel 
Arthur on Monday evening, March 
31st. Other pledges are to take their 
first degree in the near future. 



Jen and Mary 

ENGLISH AS WE SPEAK IT AT 
LAKE FOREST 

Salutations 

Hat Harris: — 'H'lo there Smudge." 
R. Stommel: — "Got your Stentor 

article." 
Expletives 

Sib: — "Tut-tut, tut-tut-tut, tut-tut, 

tut-tut." 
Trouty: — "Pish tush, that's pu- 
trid." 
Frosh Kenyon: — "Oh for the gosh 

sakes." 
Hazel Sequin: — "Hm — ah hinky do 

dad." 
Descriptive Phrases 

Winnie Mack: — "Umm h i m s so 

nice!" 
Barny — "Aw — now, I'm crumbed 

— certainly. I'm crumbed." 
Beth: — "Now I am worried." 
Sally Moore: — "Oh, — I'm silly as a 

bat." 
inquiry 

Peg: — "Weynel — how do you rate 

that?" 



Sara Moore to Miss Powell: 
"Why I don't know how you found 
any library books in my room. I'm 
sure I did not take them out. Maybe 
someone left them in my room — I 
think they belong to Mr. Sibley." 



Well, some of us gave them the 
April fool Tuesday by not getting 
back and the rest of us fooled them 
by arriving on time. 



Lowbrow hotel clerk at Gary: 

"Have you been out tramping, 

sir?" 
Robert Petton Sibley: 

"Yes — we've just bean to the 

'dewnes.' " 
Clerk: 

"I begyur pard'n — where did you 

say?" 
R. P. S.: 

"Why, to the 'dewnes.' " 
Clerk: 

"Where?" 
R. P. S.: 

"The dewnes, the dewnes, the sand 

dewnes." 
Clerk: 

"Oh. you mean the doons." 



We admit you ain't proud Ruth, but 
why call up the police station for a 
taxi? You can get them without call- 
ing sometimes. 



Bright young student at the Lib — : 
"I can't find 'Les Miserables' any- 
where. I looked over every one of 
Dickens' works and it simply was- 
n't there!" 



Indications of the Arrival 
of Spring 

Son Trouty is discovered under a 
new lid. 

Brother Kurzin sports new uphol- 
stery. 

Little Mac trims his beard. 

Beth blazes out in fiery glory. 

New desert cached at Lois Hut. 

8 : 30 permish. 




Cloth Satisfaction 

is the first step 

in Clothes 

Satisfaction 



There is practically no end 

to the variety of fabrics 

here — r e a d y to choose 
from — 

Fabrics having distinction 
and individuality — 

Fabrics of the latest weaves 
and of the finest textures. 

DEPENDABLE FABRICS 

You'll appreciate our rich 
assortment. 



Prices $40, $45, $50 
and upwards 



Jerrems Tailoring appeals 
to men who never overdo — 
especially in clothes. 



Tailor for Young Men 

Three Stores: 

7 North La Salie St. 

314 S. Michigan Ave. 

7 1 E. Monroe St. 



152 



THE STENT OR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 
Lillian Evans, '19. 
Harriet Harris, '19. 
Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 
Lydia Sprecher, '19. 
Ruth Stommel, '19. 
Eleanor Goble, '21. 

Business Managers: 
Agnes Hoffman, '19. 
Margaret Horton, '19. 

l'epo iters: 

Sara Moore, '21. 
Paul Offenlieiser, '21. 
Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 
Horace Horton, '20. 
Howard Wood, '22. 

Professor W. R. Bridgeman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



EXAM week is over again. Far 
be it from us to crab — in fact 
we solemnly swore off crabbing 
during Lent — but what's to be done 
when every one says — "Why don't 
you say something about the rotten 
way we had exams and classes all 
together the week before vacation"? 
Well we won't crab but we will re- 
gister a solemn protest against any 
more such "goin's on." Not that we 
think the protest will do any good. 
Didn't we protest against the "three 
day exam period instead of a week," 
and look what was handed us. We 
got a week all right, but a week of 
strenuous exams and regular classes 
at the same time Is going some even 
for L. F. C. So we are almost afraid 
to breathe a protest against exams as 
they were held two weeks ago. 
Heaven only knows what the result 
will be. Perhaps exams will be at 
night, or Sunday after Baccalaureate 
sermon, or maybe we'll get our di- 
plomas and then stay on the rest of 
the summer taking exams, — anything 
to keep from interrupting the regular 
class work. 

The prospect frightens us. We 
have changed our mind, (or should it 
be minds?) We are not going to pro- 
test. Let's have exams, and classes, 
and commencement, and everything 



all to oncet and get it over with. 
Nothing can kill us off and any how, 
who cares if it does? 



Big Scandal Bared 

or 

Complete Account of Tele- 
phone Conversation 
Heard at Lake 
Forest 222 

DETAILS OF LATEST THRILLER 

"OH. hullo!" 
"YEAH" 
"YEAH" 
"YES" 
"YAH" 
"UH-HUH" 
"OH" 

"WELL listen — " 
"NO" 

"YES but — " 
"WELL — I — I — " 
"UH-HUH" 
"YEHAS" 

"NOW — don't furget what I told 
yuh!" 
"NO" 

"YES — uh-huh — " 
"O! I'd love to!" 
"AWRIGHT — goo' bye." 



Garrick Club May Repeat 
Officer 666 

On Monday, April 6, the Garricl. 
Club is to repeat its successful per- 
formance of Officer 666 at the Graat 
Lakes Naval Training Station. The 
cast is rehearsing this week and will 
probably give the same show at Fort 
Sheridan before beginning a new 
play. 



Dr. Wright Attends Meet- 
ing of North Central 
Association 

On March 21st Acting President H. 
W. Wright attended a meeting of the 
North Central Association of Secon- 
dary Schools and Colleges which was 
held in the Hotel LaSalle. 



Tom, Dick and Harry 

The column wishes to announce 
that a new and very efficient sleuth 
has been added to its already com- 
petent force. The name of the new 
addition is withheld for various rea- 
sons, but there are many residents of 
Lois Durand who can testify concern- 
ing the unusual work of said Sher- 
lock. If you have a baffling case, 
bring it in and we will have it un- 
raveled for you in a most astonishing- 
ly short time. 



For the benefit of our readers we 
announce that Lucius Legner and 
William Hale Thompson were the suc- 
cessful contestants in the late cam- 
paign. 



Wanted: a nice place to go to school 
— Robert Lawrence Burchell. 



We are so sorry that we couldn't 
get a scoop on the W. G. N. and print 
some advance dope about Mildred 
Zenos and the fire escapes and all the 
thrilling things that went on behind 
closed doors. When last seen Miss 
Zenos refused to be interviewed on 
the subject. These profeshunal guys 
must have some persuasive line. 



Notice: We are not open to bribery on 
these 8:30 spring nights. Please 
don't tempt us. 

House Committee. 



Has any one noticed the rakish tilt 
on the spot light? That's a little bit 
better anyhow. Couldn't any one hit 
it? 



We expect the fussing contest to 
grow close from now on. Watch it 
carefully. Here's to the winner. 




THE STENTOR 



163 



Things That Never 
Happen 

BARNEY without a date. 

SIB giving a girl credit for having 
brains. 

TROUTY without a joke. 

THE STENTOR with too many con- 
tributions. 

TOMMY without his smile. 

DINNER with butter. 

TEA and Milk at the same meal. 

VAN never partial. 

SIB giving an A. 

ALLEE giving a cut in Lab. 

DIGAMS without friends — just now. 

KATY HORTON without bluffing. 

CHARLEY MATHER with work to 
do. 

SIGMAS with a new record. 

ELEANOR GOBLE in love. 

RAY MOORE hating himself. 

LOIS HALL'S piano tuned. 

LIL EVANS forgetting to turn on her 
smile. 

ELAINE KELLOGG without her door 
locked. 

DEANE without Woods. 

TRACEY without a green suit 

JO. M. feeling 0. K. 

CHAT TAYLOR without a new song. 

MAPLESDEN without a game leg. 



P 



tau, 



r#U !■■■ JUT ' : : PWT. ; 



& 




Inter Scholastics Soon 

The annual Inter Scholastic con- 
tests in expression and athletics will 
be held on May 9th and 10th this year. 
Already twelve high schools have en- 
rolled in the expression contests. 
This is one half the number that may 
be accepted. Professor Bridgman is 
the chairman of the committee for 
the contests in expression and Charles 
Mather of the committee which is pre- 
paring for the athletic meet. 



Margaret Horton visited Mildred 
Gerlach, Vera Pettigrew and Helen 
Wheaton during vacation. 



Exchange Notes 

The Knox "Student" of last week 
gives considerable space to a discus- 
sion of the comparative standing of 
the various groups among the stu- 
dents. This is one of the old cus- 
toms that has fallen into disuse at 
Lake Forest. We wonder if it is not 
one that might profitably be revived. 



One of the dormitories at Beloit 
was destroyed by fire last week. 



At Carrol College the student body 
has over subscribed to their annual. 
"The Hinikaga," to such an extent 
that the price of the book has been 
lowered by one dollar. 



Last Monday night Professor Sibley 
and Mason Armstrong entertained at 
cards for the men who remained on 
the campus. 



Lucy Knox has not returned to 
school. She has been ill all vacation, 
but hopes to be back in a few days. 



Miss Hamilton is attending a 
Dean's Conference in St. Louis this 
week. She is acting as a delegate 
from Lake Forest College. 




The Original 

"Mable Sykes" 

DIAMOND MEDAL -:- ARTIST -:- PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 

140 North State Street 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts.) 

Established at present location since 1906 
MAKER OF HY-CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 
Phone Central 5341 



154 



THE STENTOR 





STYLES THAT 


PLEASE 


for 


COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 


RASMUSSEN BROS 


. BOOT SHOP 




M A RKET Sq 


U ARE 



USE BOWMAN'S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-K9 Vine Ave 



The 
Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSER. Prop. 
Phone ! 7 Lake Forest, 111, 




The daily use ol 

KOSMEO CREAM 

and 

KOSMEO POWDER 

and a weeklu visit to 

Mrs. Graham's 
Beaut" Shop 

1432 Stevens Bldg. 

will create a perfect 

complexion. 

TRY IT. 



Alumni Notes 

1897. Rev. Alexander McFerran, af- 
ter a twelve year successful pastorate 
at Oskaioosa, Iowa, has accepted a 
call to Mt Pleasant in the same state. 



1S98. Miss Mary Hippie is on the 
second year of a three-year course in 
Designing at the Chicago Art Insti- 
tute. At the end of the first year she 
was successful in winning a scholar- 
ship, and finds her work very inter- 
esting and promising. 



1900. Married at Manhattan, III., 
March 19, Miss Ethel McClenahan 
and Mr. Walter B. Hoagland. Ai 
home after May 15 at 105 East Sixth 
St., Manhattan, Kans. 



1904. Linden McCullough is now 
county superintendent of Kittitas 
County, Washington, residing at Els- 
berg, and is still a coming man in 
the state educational circles. 



1907. John B. (Jack) Lewis drop- 
ped in on Lake Forest on the evening 
of Friday, March 21st, and finding 
the campus pretty much vacated, took 
refuge at the house of the alumni 
editor who certainly greatly enjoyed 
a long reminiscent talk with him by 
the fireside. Incidentally, he gathers 
that Mr. Lewis is at present a sort of 
jobber in the moving picture business, 
buying from producers the state 
rights of certain select films and 
booking these throughout the states 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Established 1171 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 
73-75 W. South Water Street 

Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



C. T. Gunn Co. 
Grocers 

Agency Huyler's Candi s 

Curtice Bros. Goods LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Why? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



Successor to 
Harry Levin 



KUBELSKY 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



THE STENTOR 



155" 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 



Dr. G. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



llllllll!lllllllllillll!llllllllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHlllillllli:illlllllllllllllllllll! 

"^LASS Pins and Rings. 

"■" / Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 



SPEIS BROS. 



27 E. MONROE ST. 

CHICAGO 

lllllinillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIHIBUIIllllllllllllllllUllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIII 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 



llllll!lllllllllll!l!ll!ll!![U![|l![lllllil!llllll!iliil!l!!lll!llll!llllllll 
/^y For Light 

It/TC For Heat 
XJl**3 For Power 

North Shore Gas Co. 

mil 



which he thus controls very much as 
a theatrical agent books plays. That 
is, he carries a force of traveling ad- 
vance agents who go about to the 
promising towns and sell the rights 
of production. He reports that his 
brother Howard, '12 is still in the 
service, though he didn't get to 
France. Some of the other notes this 
week are obviously due to him. 



1907. Rev. C. R. Longbrake, is now 
located at Lenton, a coalmining sub- 
urb of Seattle. 



1915. Harold W. Adams is with J. 
Warren Gould, one of the leading ar- 
chitects of Seattle, Washington. 



1919. Charles Perrigo at last ac- 
counts was still at Post Flying 
Field, Fort Sill, Okla. 






Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusive 
Dry Goods Store 

9 




Dry Goods 



_yfShopfor 
Ubmens&Childrens Furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



1919. Gifford Holden is at present 
with the Peoria Evening Journal in 
the Circulation Department. 





J. F. KERRIGAN 

EXPRESSMAN 

Special Attention Given to Students 



TELEPHONE I 
NUMBERS I 



Residence 675 
Office 384 



«xS*3x8xSxSxSxS>3 



Safe 




SPALDING 
BASE BALL EQUIPMENT 

Uniforms, Caps, Belts, Stockings, Shoes, 
Bats, Balls, Gloves, Masks, Etc 

Catalogue on request 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 
211-217 So. State St., Chicago. 111. 



TheQualityTireCo. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsfcy 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 
Anderson (Building 



Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision 'Dealers 



Grocery 



Market 



807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 

Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



$74 00 takes beautiful new 

^ * $250.00 mahogany finish 

phonograph and records. Never used. 
60 inches high. Latest design. Will ship 
C. O. D. on approval. 

Mrs. Waverly Brown 

317 Greenleftf Ave., Wilmette. Illinoi, 



156 



THE STENTOR 




I1IBBIH 



HIIIIBSllllllllIllllllillillllllllll 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C, the college work for the rest of tta 
year will be reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — will be 
continued for this year; consequently the second term will open on Tuesday, Jan. 7. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
?360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, IU. 



^llllllli!l!l!lllillll!l!llll 



lllllllllli 



is: 



is 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 



C.G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 
Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning and Pressing . . $1.50 

Pressing ... . . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 

WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



—J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 

Military IVatches and 
College Jewelry 



The JOAN TEA ROOM 



Market Square 

TEA ROOM and RESTAURANT 

Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m- 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Oscar Pierson 

FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 

Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Go. 

Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 

Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, APRIL 11, 1919. 



NUMBER 21 



Capt. Stuart Speaks 
in Chapel 

On Monday morning, Captain 
James Victor Stuart of the class of 
1915 spoke in Chapel. He gave a 
brief but illuminating sketch of his 
experiences in France, at the front, 
and in Germany in the Army of Occu- 
pation. It was by far the most in- 
teresting account we have had from 
one of our own Lake Foresters return- 
ing from active service. 

• He commenced by saying, "There 
are two sides to war, the tragic and 
the funny side. The American 
doughboy saw always the funny side." 
And, "When things seemed incon- 
ceivably dark and spirits began 
to fall, the unquenchable humor of 
the colored boys saved the day." 

Captain Stuart spent some time in 
a British Gas School in France study- 
ing gas warfare, which he said, "the 
Hun started and the Americans fin- 
ished." On the 22rid of October 1917, 
his division went into line with the 
French in what he called a "quiet 
sector." On November 1st they took 
their first German prisoner and in 
January 191S they took over the first 
sector taken over by Americans. In 
April the division was moved to a 
"busy sector" which proved to be the 
worst they ever saw, and at a time 
when things looked very dark for the 
Allies. Cantigny was taken by them 
and held, because "The Americans 
didn't know enough to give in 
counter attacks." "If any date can 
be set when the war was won," he 
said, "it is July 18th." 

The Chapel bell was a most un- 
welcome sound and there was not 
one Lake Forester who did not feel 
proud of Captain Stuart and his part 
in the war. 

Mr. Roberts Speaks on 
Friday 

Last Thursday the Reverend George 
Roberts was the chapel speaker. His 
subject was "Moral Courage and Its 
Importance to Every One." As usual, 
Mr. Robert's talk was interesting and 
impressive. 



Athletic Dance To- 
morrow Night 

There's going to be a Grand dance 
Saturday night. 

Do you know that? What's more 
the orchestra is going to be one of 
Harvey's. It promises to be some lit- 
tle get together. 

Probably some of you are wonder- 
ing, especially the south side of the 
campus, just how much said hop is 

going to put you back. Well 

tickets are one dollar and a half. 

The money taken in at the party is 
to help along athletics in general at 
Lake Forest College. It will help de- 
fray expenses for Interscholastic and 
other things which the Athletic Asso- 
ciation must meet. 

Come and bring your friends and 
you and they will have a peach of a 
time. By coming you'll boost the 
school and show your spirit and co- 
operation. 



Commencement Program 



Announced 



The program for commencement 
week has been announced. It begins 
June the sixth and continues until the 
tenth. The Senior Chapel Service is 
on Friday, June the sixth. Saturday 
is Alumni Day with the Alumni 
luncheon and the Senior dance in the 
evening. On Sunday the Baccalaur- 
eate sermon is given. Monday is 
Class Day and Tuesday Commence- 
ment. The Class Day Program has 
not yet been decided upon but the 
four commencement speakers have 
been chosen. 
They are — 

Harriet Harris — Science and Mathe- 
matics. 

Gwendolyn Massey — Languages and 
Philosophy. 

Philip Speidel — Political Science 
and Biblical Literature. 

Ruth Stommel — English and His- 
tory. 

Virginia Wales attended Gamma 
Phi Dance at Northwestern last week. 



Mildred Zenos visited the campus 
one day last week. 



Phi Pi Entertains 
Girls at Party 

Phi Pi Epsilon entertained royally 
at an informal party on Friday night, 
April 4. The fraternity rooms looked 
very attractive in their new spring 
outfit. The evening was spent in 
dancing and cards, followed by a 
most delicious supper. Everyone 
was sorry when the time came to 
leave. The guests were: Misses 
Massey. Brown, McCullum, Merner. 
Martin. Clarke, Horton, Stevens. Ger- 
lach. Barnthouse, Z. Farwell, I. Far 
well, and Evans. The music was 
from Evanston. 

Oh That Serenade! 

Oh man, that serenade talk about 
Orpheus and his lute, you Romeos 
had the whole of Lois Hall spell 
bound and following you. 

When that old sax would whine 
and hesitate — Oh-man!! It's a 
wonder there wasn't a whole casu- 
alty list of girls who had leaned too 
far out of the window, lost their equi- 
librium, and joyfully landed on moth- 
er Earth. 

However, everyone managed with 
much effort to keep her balance and 
appreciation was expressed by much 
applause and more pounding on the 
windows. Such serenades are sure 
great. The combination of a wonder- 
ful night, Lillis wielding the Saxo- 
phone, Ote the Banjo, and many 
voices raised in manly adoration. . . 
well, words can't express what the 
girls think of that. The girls only 
wish they could return the compli- 
ment by serenading the men but they 
fear the pain resulting might remove 
all the glamour and romance from 
serenades so they will refrain. 

Faculty Passes New Rule 

At Faculty Meeting last Wednes- 
day, a new rule was passed. This 
prohibits any communication between 
inhabitants of Lois Hall and those of 
the South Campus when such com- 
munication takes place from the win- 
dows of the aforesaid hall. Violators 
of this rule will be requested to leave 
Lake Forest College. 



158 



THE STENTOR 



Mel Gray Now 
in University 
of Grenoble 



» * * 

An opportunity being given for a 
certain few officers to pursue their 
chosen line of study in French univer- 
sities, I applied for such opportunity. 
* * * 

I am now enrolled in the regular 
course, at the regular university of 
Grenoble, where all the lecturers are 
to be given in regular French. 

Splendid! Just one little point 
to emphasize how really splendid it 
is. The work being in French — it 
will be necessary for me to take notes 
in French short-hand — and — I've for- 
gotten my French short-hand. Some 
people have no sense of humor, but 
I bet "Van," and Freddie Dunsmore 
would laugh up their respective 
sleeves at the situation. I am so 
happy that I have a chance to decide 
as to whether or not I shall continue 
with law. When I return to the 
States I am going to look for a job 
and a dinner pail. 

Grenoble is what is called a "bon 
sector," it is noted as a summer re- 
sort and University center. It is 
more modern than most French 
towns, but it has sections which date 
back into small numbers. It is situa- 
ted well up in the French Alps and is 
surrounded by snow capped peaks. 
It is being used as a leave center for 
the A. E. F. and so is well provided 
with amusements and recreations in 
which we are fortunate enough to 
have a share. On the whole, and in 
spite of my deplorable lack of short 
hand, I think my stay is to be in- 
teresting and perhaps profitable. 



Mr. Sibley Entertains at 
Tea 

On Thursday of last week Profes- 
sor Sibley entertained the Chancer 
and Senior English classes at tea. 
Mason Armstrong helped serve. As 
usual, the refreshments were deli- 
cious and everyone reported a de- 
lightful afternoon. 



Margaret and Horace Horton en- 
tertained their father last Sunday. 



Music School Notes 



UNIVERSITY CLUB ENTERTAINED 

The University Club was entertain- 
ed by the Music School on Thursday 
evening. Dr. Henry Purmont Eames 
gave a very interesting and scholarly 
paper on "Canons of musical criti- 
cism." The interest of the club mem- 
bers was keen until the end. A gen- 
eral discussion ensued followed by a 
social hour in the parlor. The Music 
School girls served light refreshments 
to their guests. This was the first 
opportunity the school has had to 
welcome the college faculty as guests 
in North Hall. We were very glad 
to have them and hope they will come 
again. 



Miss Marion Coates, former prin- 
cipal of Ferry Hall, visited in Lake 
Forest last week-end. The Music 
School was proud to have her as its 
guest at a Spring Breakfast. The 
other guest of honor was Miss Tre- 
main. The color scheme of yellow 
and white was carried out in the table 
decorations and menu. During break- 
fast the girls took great pleasure in 
playing to their good friends of whom 
they like to think as part of their 
family. 



"Wop" Lawson ex. '20 was the 
guest of Digamma over the week end. 



A Ferry in speaking of the coming 
dance asked if Digamma was a soror- 
ity. 



"Bivey" in telling us about reading 
the Bible says she learned all about 
"Jonah and the Ark" and "Noah and 
the whale." 

Glee Club to Sing Easter 
Sunday 

The College Women's Glee Club, 
under the direction of Mrs. M. Bross 
Thomas, and Mr. Gruenstein, is pre- 
paring to sing at the Easter Service 
to be held in the Presbyterian Church 
Easter morning. 

The girls are working very con- 
scientiously on the interesting pro- 
gram which has been arranged. So 
come out and show them their efforts 
have not been in vain. 



Garrick Pledges New 
Members 

The Garrick Club pledged five new 
members last night. 

Those who were pledged were Mil- 
dred Gerlach, Frances McFerran, Joe 
Sieux, James Leonard, Tom Hale. 

These people played in "Officer 
6 66" and each one did some clever 
acting. 

The initiation of these newly 
pledged members and those pledged 
after the first play "Jack Straw" will 
take place in the near future, and 
there are plans on foot for a ban- 
quet following the initiation. 

The members of the Club have fi- 
nally decided on a pin which is a 
typical dramatic emblem. 

Long years ago the Garrick mem- 
bers had a pin but it has been forgot- 
ten in the years that followed so the 
pins are really an innovation. 



House Committee Takes 
Action 

At a special meeting of House Com- 
mittee on Wednesday night the fol- 
lowing sentences were imposed: 

Lorraine Maclay — two weeks strict 
campus. 

Virginia Wales — two weeks strict 
campus. 

Kathryn 
campus. 

Lillian Evans 

Ann Merner — 



Horton — one week strict 



Miss Hamilton has returned from 
St. Louis where she has been attend- 
ing a Deans' Conference. 



Mildred Gerlach entertained her 
father and mother, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Church of Chicago last Sunday. 



) week night privi- 
) leges taken away 
for two weeks. 
Margaret Horton ) week night 
Bea Worthley ) privileges taken 
Helen Barnthouse) away for one 
week. 



Intelligence Tests at Lake 
Forest 

Since Columbia University has stop- 
ped giving exams and has substituted 
intelligence tests we suggest a few 
that might be used at Lake Forest: 

HAT HARRIS climb a fire escape. 

H. WOOD give a tea party. 

PEG HORTON walk across the 
campus alone. 

JACK REES give a solo dance. 

GWEN MASSEY come to chapel on 
time. 

"WOP" McCOLLUM bluff a prof. 

DAVE REESE sing in the choir. 

SARA MOORE sit still five minutes. 

CHAT TAYLOR not talk during 
French. 

M. MUDGE not talk to the ladies. 



THE STENTOR 



159 



Is That So? 

Prof.: "You wrong a man when 
you give him liquor." 

Bright Student (?): "I wish some- 
one would wrong me." 



Mildred Gerlach (Under the in- 
fluence of a Spring day): "When I 
look out of the window at night and 
see the beautiful stars, I look up and 
I pick out the brightest of them all 
and I am happy for that same star is 
shining down upon my beloved." Just 
then someone hit her in the head 
with a New Testament. 



Jack Reese to Ray Moore: "Can I 
take OUR girl to the dance next Fri- 
day?" 



Most of these Spring walking dates 
end with the first comfortable bench. 



Now that Hotel Lois Hall has been 
closed, the young men can be found 
at the Hotel Music School. 



GIVE ME LIBERTY OR GIVE ME 
DEATH is the cry of the three fair 
damsels, who have been campused for 
letting Spring get the best of them. 



There is a certain young lady at 
Ferry Hall, who is singing, "I Want 
A Doll." 

Micky! Take back that doll. 



If they do not stop restricting the 
young ladies at the Hall, the dance 
Saturday will not look like a college 
affair. 



Sigma Tau wishes to announce the 
pedging of Mr. Mudge. 



Mr. Herbert Peterson formerly of 
Lake Forest College has decided to 
enter the business world. 



Phi Pi's had a testimony meeting 
in their rooms Thursday afternoon. 
Mr. McFerran presided and Brother 
Davis played the piano. The testi- 
monies were so convincing that 
Brother Eddy was brought to tears 
and decided to lead a better life. 



OVER LOIS HALL ENTRANCE 

God Bless our Home, 
So say we all of us. 



Jen and Mary 

GRADES. 

There are grades that you show to 
mother, 

There are grades that they send to 
Dad, 

There are grades that they keep in 
secret, 

And you wish that you ne-v-er had, 

There are grades that belie your 
stand-in, 

And the grades that you don't re- 
call, 

But the grades that you get from the 
profs round here 

Are the durn'dest grades of all. 

There's the grade that you get from 

Trouty, 
And the flunk that you get from Sib, 
There's the grade that Allee hands 

you, 
That's the one that makes you fib. 
There's a grade that you rate from 

Psychic, 
And the grade that you land from 

Van, 
But the grades that we get from 

you, — Jerome, 
Are the grades of an honest man. 



We are'nt the kind that would com- 
pare grades with kisses, but there 
are those who have told us that the 
tune would be hard to recognize. 



Have you recovered sufficiently to 
be able to accept our congratulations, 
Red? Should think you'd feel like 
a nichol or maybe a red cent pulling 
a fall like that. Nevermind old boy: 
practice makes perfect! 



We've heard of sudden meetings, 
of secret meetings and of unpremedi- 
tated meetings, but we have to hand 
it to Sillar and Kenyon, incorporated, 
to put on the thrillers. Ask your 
neighbors — it's a real wheeze. 



Was the Nichols affair a faint or a 
feint? 



Trouty — "Miss Reichert name the 
personal pronouns." 

Gladys — "Myself and yourself." 



PRAYER OF A CAMPUSED MAIDEN 

Dear Lord, please send rain and 
make the sun to go under a cloud and 
the wind to be chill. 

And oh, Lord, I beseech thee, make 
the shores of Lake Michigan to be 
dreary and joyless. Amen. 



Speed 



Down by the lake in the pale moon- 
light, 
Where oft the little fish do bite. 
Set a maiden fair and a man brunette, 
And there they set and set and set. . 

Down by the lake on the yellow sand 
He sat and tried to hold her hand. 
But she wouldn't let him, she was coy, 
Instead she held the hand of that boy. 



Lucy Knox has returned to school 
after a short absence on account of 
illness. 




Cloth Satisfaction 

is the first step 

in Clothes 

Satisfaction 



There is practically no end 

to the variety of fabrics 

here — r e a d y to choose 
from — 

Fabrics having distinction 
and individuality — 

Fabrics of the latest weaves 
and of the finest textures. 

DEPENDABLE FABRICS 

You'll appreciate our rich 
assortment. 



Prices $40, $45, $50 
and upwards 



Jerrems Tailoring appeals 
to men who never overdo — 
especially in clothes. 




Tailor for Young Men 

Three Stores: 

7 North La Salle St. 

3 1 4 S. Michigan Ave. 

71 E. Monroe St. 



160 



THE S T E N T O R 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Hoard of Editors: 
Lillian Evans, '19. 
Harriet Harris, '19. 
Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 
Lydia Spreclier, '19. 
Ruth Stomrael, '19. 
Eleanor Goble, '21. 

Business Managers t 
Agnes Hoffman, 'i9. 
Margaret Horton, '19. 

Reporters: 

Sara Moore, '21. 
Paul Offenheiser, '21. 
Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 
Horace Horton, '20. 
Howard Wood, '22. 

Professor W. R. Bridgeinan 

Faculty and Alumni. 



Subscription Rates: 



One Year . 
Ten Issues 



.$2.00 
.75 



Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est. Illinois, as second-class matter. 



IT is not an uncommon thing to 
hear an occasional student express 
appreciation of some particular 
Chapel talk, but it is quite remarka- 
ble for a Chapel address to bring 
forth the amount of praise and in- 
terest aroused recently by one of our 
alumni who has just returned from 
France. It was a rousing good talk 
and very well made, and the feeling 
of pride in the achievements of one 
of our own men was probably not 
the least part of the emotion which 
everyone felt. At the close of this 
address, however, the speaker struck 
rather "close home" when he sug- 
gested s part yet to be played by the 
people "at home." When the re- 
turned soldier is discharged from 
service, his duty has been accom- 
plished, hut there has not yet been 
an official demobilization of the works 
at home. A very important part of 
our duty is yet to be played in put- 
ting through the coming Victory 
Loan. Lake Forest students have a 
right to share in the glory achieved 
by their men in active service, but 
they must not forget the part still 
to be played in helping to pay the 
cost. Let's show our appreciation 
and pride by investing in Victory 
Bonds and War Stamps. 



Who Was Pushing 
the Ouija? 

It was a particularly drab colored 
day and everyone seemed to be out 
of sorts. There appeared to be no 
enthusiasm at all on the campus. 
Even the occasional grumblings were 
hushed and everyone went about with 
a glum sullen expression hardly 
speaking to their very closest friends. 
Finally in despair I brought forth 
the trusty Ouija board to see if I 
could find out what was the matter 
and what was the cause of it all. 

I asked for the Spirit of Lake 
Forest as she is the oldest and closest 
relative of those of the college who 
have passed into the "great beyond," 
but the Ouija spelt forth the words, 
"I a-m t-h-e S-p-i-r-i-t o-f P-u-b-1-i-c 
O-p-i-n-i-o-n and have come to you 
instead of the Spirit of Lake Forest. 

"The Spirit of Lake Forest is weak 
and ill. In fact she is in a very 
critical condition. It is for this rea- 
son I have come to you. You ask me 
what the matter is and I answer that 
it is because you have neglected the 
Spirit of Lake Forest and have allow- 
ed her to decline into the serious con- 
dition that she is now in, that every- 
one is out of sorts. They are mourn- 
ing for her but do not know that it 
lies in their power to revive her. 

"I, Public Opinion, have come to 
you today to warn you that if she is 
not revived than you will lose her en- 
tirely. Go forth, therefore, and tell 
them that through morality, justice, 
and honesty of purpose they can cure 
her and rid themselves of this gloomy, 
sullen, morbidness that has encircled 
them." 



Lillian Evans visited Sara Ross at 
the Three Arts Club in Chicago, last 
week end. 



Vera Pettigrew and Beth Thayer 
spent the week end at home in Chi- 
cago. 



Sigma Tau entertained Delia Bab- 
cock over the week end. 



Mason and Rebecca Armstrong are 
entertaining their mother this week. 



Edith Wise is ill at Lois Hall, her 
friends all hope for her speedy re- 
covery. 



Ruth Kennedy is enjoying an at- 
tack of mumps at her home in Wheat- 
field. 



Tom, Dick and Harry 

Fire Notice — In case of fire in Lois 
Durand Hall do not attempt any of 
the usual exits, nor the fire escapes, 
for they are all securely barricaded 
against possible transgressors of the 
laws of the domain. If you discover 
a fire run quietly down and beg the 
assistant Dean to let you out, having 
first persuaded her that you are not 
spoofing or trying to get away with 
anything — you may then call the 
fire department and they will place 
ladders to the windows thus letting 
the occupants of the building escape, 
Those possessing rope ladders of their 
own, of course, will stand a greater 
chance of saving themselves, but if 
you do happen to be fortunate enuf 
to possess one it is best to conceal the 
fact from sleuths concealed within 
the building or suspicion may be cast 
upon you. 



And what could be worse than a 
campus sentence in spring? Brethren, 
let us pray. 



Please observe Flora Shattuck's 
L. F. Sweater, what does this mean, 
Flora? 



Oh me, oh me, if this spring weath- 
er persists this column may turn into 
a line of assorted poetrj' or advice to 
the love-lorn. 



Mirror, mirror, on the wall, 
Now will you tell me true 

If I'm to be a reg'lar vamp 
Just what am I to do? 

If you will be a reg'lar vamp 
Just follow close this rule — 

Smile at the men tho it gives you a 
cramp 
And you'll be a success in School. 



Waddye Mean "Quiet"? 

Here's what Loyola "Prep" says 
about us — 

"THE STENTOR — Lake Forest 
College, Illinois. This weekly paper 
although it contains considerable 
variation is a literary success. The 
humor contained within is not hilar- 
ious .but quiet and unpretentious. 
The news items are written as if by 
the pen of a 'star' reporter. Many 
interesting communications from for- 
mer students now in the service are a 
source of keen enjoyment as well as 
instructive. The literary talent ex- 
hibited is abundant, showing a large 
display of varied knowledge.^.- m 



THE S T E N T O R 



161 



Kickers 



Now then, before starting on this 
little episode the author wishes to 
make clear the fact that it is not 
directed at anyone in particular but 
is written in defense of the "Stentor," 
of which considerable has been re- 
marked during the past few weeks. 
The theme of this article has been 
chosen as "kickers," but it might just 
as easily have been called anything 
else, for the principle involving will 
apply just the same. 

In general there are three kinds 
of kickers: shot-guns, mules, and 
some people. The mule kicks be- 
cause he was born that way; the shot- 
gun because it was built that way, 
and the human being because it is 
a right thoughtlessly granted to him 
by the constitution. (According to 
Dr. Raymond's Comp. Government 
class). 

The human kicker is divided in to 
two main classes — acute and chron- 
ic. The ACUTE kicker kicks because 
he has something to kick at. He 
kicks until he removes the object 
and then subsides. His ailment is 
more violent but he usually recovers 
in the course of time. 

For the CHRONIC KICKER, how- 
ever, there is no hope. He must 
kick to live. Nature has shamelessly 
connected his lungs with his hind 
legs, and the only way to stop his 
kicking is to shut off his breath. 
This was often done in days gone by 



when human life was so cheap that 
a patriot could go out with an axe 
and get enough culls and seconds for 
a mess any day without objection. 
But nowadays, we have to let the 
kicker live. The most we can do to 
him is to elect him to an office or en- 
courage him to buy a racing automo- 
bile. 

The chronic kicker stands forever 
in the road of progress with his heels 
pointed in the direction of progress. 
He kicks on the Stentor, the profes- 
sors, and on his fellow-students. In 
public life I imagine he would also 
kick on such things as the price of 
salt, on the Supreme Court, on the 
minister of his church, on the plan 
to take up a collection for the fami- 
lies of squashed firemen, on the 
speed and slowness and heat and 
chilliness and bigness and smallness 
of street cars, on the design of the 
latest style tablecloth, on the size of 
the Sunday newspapers, on the weath- 
er, on the public, and on Nature in 
general. 

According to specialists who have 
investigated the matter quite thor- 
oughly, most kickers were born on 
Friday, because that is the world's 
unlucky day. He begins criticising 
his food on the day of his birth. 
When he grows up he has to approach 
his fellowmen from the rear in order 
to say "Good morning" to them, ex- 
cept at long range, and when he dies 
the undertaker issues orders to the 
hearse driver to drive slowly, and 



avoid all jolts. The . Egyptians in- 
vented embalming at a time when the 
nation was infested with kickers, in 
the hope of making death, perma- 
nent. 

Col. Fitch once said that Heaven 
is full of kickers that the other place 
saw coming. Besides, a kicker is 
usually too busy objecting to do any- 
thing bad, and so goes the world. 
But it has been arranged in Heaven 
that when a kicker begins to kick, 
he has to stop flying. This gives the 
other angels a chance to escape, for 
thus far no kicker has ever been able 
to aviate beyond the ground floor. 

We have kickers here, as doe3 
every ether educational institution, 
and in fact every community of any 
size whatever. There is one thing 
they must have in order to be suc- 
cessful, that is a good audience. 
Let's work on the reduction of the 
audiences just a wee bit. Thank you! 



Alumni Notes 

1912. Rev. W. H. Marbach since re- 
tiring from his army chaplaincy has 
accepted the pastorate of the State 
St. Presbyterian Church in Jackson- 
ville, 111., a church of same 45f 
members. Living within a stone's 
throw of Illinois College, he can hard- 
ly recruit students for us from his 
neighborhood, but his interest contin- 
ues cordial. 





a 



The Original 

able Sykes" 



DIAMOND MEDAL -:- ARTIST -:- PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 



140 North State Street 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts. ) 

Established at present location since 1906 

MAKER OF HY-CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 

Phone Central 5341 



162 



THE STENTOR 



for 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 



RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Sq u are 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

CARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., C H I C 4 G O 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 




The dailuj use oi 

KOSMEO CREAM 

ana 

KOSMEO POWDER 

and a weekly visit to 

Mrs. Graham's 
Beautvj Shop 

1432 Stevens Bldg. 

will create a perfect 

complexion. 
TRY IT. 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsfay 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision 'Dealers 



Grocery Market 

807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 
Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



usTROWMAN^S safe milk 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 

BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Gleneoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-109 Vine Ave. 



New Service List 
Being Completed 

As replies to Professor Bridgman's. 
questionaires come in we will print 
the record of some of the men who 
have represented Lake Forest in ac- 
tive war service. The first list fol- 
lows — 

CAPT. JOHN E. KEMP, '01 

1901. John Edward Kemp, 701 E. 
Prospect St., Kewanee, 111., was made 
a Captain in the Engineer Officers' 
Reserve Corps in June, 1917. He 
attended the 2nd Engineers' Train- 
ing Camp at Fort Leavenworth in the 
fall of 1917 and was released there 
to take up work as Superintendent of 
Construction, Ordnance Base Repair 
Shops, A. E. F. France. He served 
in this capacity until December 11, 
1918. 

LEON D. CALLAHAN, '08 

1908. Leon Dudley Callahan, 1101 
Colcord Bldg., Oklahoma City, Okla., 
enlisted in the Navy May 15, 1918. 
He was trained at Pu|*et Soutid, 
Washington and Pelham Bay, New 
York and was made an instructor in 
the Submarine Listeners Section. On 
November 15th 1918 he received the 
rating of Chief Petty Officer and 
entered the Officers School Pay Corps 
in December 1918. He has been re- 
leased from active duty since the 
first of January. 

LIEUT. E. G. BERKHEISER, '00 

1909. E. G. Berkheiser, of Sheldon, 
111., enlisted in the M. 0. T. C. on 
July 1, 1917. He was sent to Base 
Hospital Ft. Riley, Kansas in Decem- 
ber, 1917, several months later took 
some special training in Chicago 
Hospitals, and was made Head of 
Orthopedic Surgeons at Camp Jack- 
son. He has been at Fort Sheridan 
since February 10, 1919. His com- 
mission is that of 1st Lieutenant 
Medical Corps. 

LIEUT. PERRY J. KECK, '10 

1910. Perry J. Keck of Fairbury, 111., 
enlisted November 1917 and was 
trained at Camp Dodge. In August 
1918 he was sent abroad as a First 
Sergeant in Co. I. 349 U. S. Infantry 
and on reaching France entered an 
Officers' Training School. He was 
commissioned Second Lieutenant in 
October 1918 and is now attached to 
the First Division in the Army of 
Occupation, Co. M. 16th Infantry. 



THE STENTOR 



163 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

EXPRESSMAN 

Special Attention Given to Students 



TELEPHONE j 

NUMBERS i 



Residence 675 
Office 384 



The \^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Dr. G. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



/^JLASS Pins and Rings. 
^" > ^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 
SPIES BROS 



minim 



27 E. MONROE ST. 

CHICAGO 

■IIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIi 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 



■■Ill 

/^y For Light 

i T fl C For Heat 
V^l/fO ForPower 

North Shore Gas Co. 

■iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiin 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 
Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusive 
Dry Goods Store 




Dry Goods 

^yfShopfor 
^Womens&Childrens furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



LIEUT. WM. F. BIDDISON, '14 

1914. William F. Biddison of Otturu- 
wa, la., entered the service on August 
5, 1917. He was sent to Camp Cody, 
N. M. where he was promoted finally 
to a Sergeant, 1st Class. On Septem- 
ber 11, 1918, he was commissioned a 
2nd Lieutenant and ordered to Camp 
Travis, Texas, for duty with the 18th 
Division Supply Train; where he re- 
mained until December 1918. He 
was discharged on December 19, 1918 
after having been promoted to 1st 
Lieutenant in Reserve. 

LIEUT. A. F. JOHNSON, '15 

1915. Adolph F. Johnson, 334 N. 
Weller St., Ottumwa, Iowa., entered 
the Officers' Training Camp at Fort 
Snelling, Minn, and received a com- 
mission as First Lieutenant Reserve 
in the 42nd Inf. (Regular Army) at 
Camp Dodge, Iowa. Later he was 
stationed wijth a detachment near 
Willmington, Del. on guard duty. On 
July, 19 IS, his regiment became a 
part of the 12th Division at Camp 
Devens, Mass. from where they were 
scheduled to start for France on 
November 12th 1918. The signing 
of the armistice prevented their de- 
parture and Johnson spent the rest 
of the time until his discharge in 
February at Camp Upton, N. Y. on 
guard duty. 



JOHN M. HA WES, '17 

1917. John M. Hawes enlisted on 
August 1, 191S at Rock Island, 111. 
and was trained at Camp Syracuse, 
N. Y. from August 1st to November 
4th. He was made a Corporal in the 
17th Service Company, Signal Corps, 
Washington, D. C, and served there 
from November 4, 1918 to February 
17, 1919. He was discharged (at 
Camp Meigs, D. C, on February 17, 
1919, and his permanent address is 
2900 ISth Ave., Rock Island, 111. 

VINCENT F. COLEMAN, '19 

1919. Vincent F. Coleman enlisted 
in the U. S. Ambulance Service in 
May 1917, received his training at the 
University of Chicago and Allenton, 
Pa., and left for overseas work in 
Italy in May 1918. He was a member 
of Section 527 which took an active 
part in the great Piave drive and 
spent more time on the mountains 
than any other one in his Section. 
Although his car was "wounded and 
laid up", he remained on the job. 
Coleman received two war crosses 
from the Italian Government. 



L. H. W. SPE1DEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Established lUll 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 

73-75 W. South Water Street 
Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



The 
Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TR1EBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone I 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD. Prop. 
Phone 175 

Wh$? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 
O'Neill'* Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



FITDDI C17"V Succesiorto 

KUdHLSM Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



164 



THE STENTOR 



llll!lllll!lll!lllllllllllllllllllll!!lll!IIIIIIIIIII]||!!lll!il«ffl^ 






LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LXKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C.. the college work for the rest of the 
year has been reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — continues 
for this year; consequently the third term opened on Tuesday, April 1. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French ; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE. Lake Forest, 111. 



;- : \ ':; 'u'\ ''^i.. ■'.: . l ^.. .:■....,. : . m,'.:. ' : ::-^-^ 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 
Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 
..,, Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 

C.G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 
Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning ■ Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Clearriag and Pressing . . SI. 50 

Pressing. .... . .' . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 



At 



French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



Th 



J 



AMES MITCHELL 
E WELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The Market Square Restau- 
rant and Tea Room 

Open 7:00 a- m. to 8:00 p. m. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ana 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Co. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

AH branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 




The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIII. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, APRIL IS, 1919. 



NUMBER 22 



Athletic Dance a Success JEaster Service Held 

iii Chapel 



One of the most enjoyable dances of 
the year was held Saturday night in 
the Durand Art Institute. It was an 
Athletic Benefit dance, the proceeds 
going to help keep up our College Ath- 
letics. There was a large number of 
people in attendance, both from the 
College and from the town. The music 
was Harvey's and had all the pep neces- 
sary to make the evening a success. 

A feature of the evening was the 
decorations — for which John Dorn is 
given due credit and honorable men- 
tion — the place had all the earmarks 
of a formal dance, thanks to John's 
ingenuity. 

From a financial standpoint the 
dance was a success and everyone who 
went felt that he had gotten value 
received in pleasure. 



Dr. Stuart Visits Lake 
Forest 

SPEAKS IN CHAPEL FRIDAY 

On Friday. April 11th, the students 
of Lake Forest College were delighted 
to welcome Dr. Lewis Stuart in chapel. 
Dr. Stuart was Professor of Latin here 
from 1SS9 until his retirement from 
active teaching in 1916. In his brief 
address Dr. Stuart urged all college 
students to acquire the habit of read- 
ing. He reviewed Mrs. Humphrey 
Ward's Autobiography and suggested it 
as one of the books every one should 
read. To the younger students who 
have not known Dr. Stuart an added 
interest was the fact that Captain 
James Victor Stuart who spoke in 
chapel on Monday, is Dr. Stuart's 
nephew. 



Y. W. C. A. Officers and 
Cabinet Chosen 

The Y. W. C. A. is very happy with 
a new, peppy and enthusiastic Presi- 
dent at its head. At the business meet- 
ing on the tenth of this month Eleanor 
Gable was elected President and Hazel 
Seguin, Vice-President. With two such 
capable people to help new things the 
remaining months ought to count a lot 



REV. PRANK FITT SPEAKS 

On Thursday an Easter service was 
held in chapel. The service was ar- 
ranged for this day to suit the con- 
venience of the speaker who was the 
Rev. Frank Fitt of Highland Park. 
Mr. Fitt is in a sense an alumnus of 
Lake Forest as he did his first two 
years of college work here with the 
class of 1911. 

Mr. Fitt's subject was "The Death 
of Jesus Christ." He said in part, 
"The most striking thing about the 
Christ is his interest in the spiritual 
development of others, most of all 
in the submerged tenth of the social 
life of His day. He made his su- 
preme sacrifice for them. Yet this 
self-sacrificing and sinless man was 
compelled to sink from disaster to 
disaster until a felon's death was the 
reward. His dominating passion was 
vicarious devotion. The whole life 
of the Christ was an atoning process, 
crucifixion was only the natural re- 
sult. 

"The saints of today are those 
who show forth that for which the 
Christ died. The principle of the 
cross runs all through life. Tlje 
atoning process works out all over 
the world in human life. No con- 
ception of atonement is sufficient 
unless it deals with sin. The Mas- 
ter's death is a saving power, the 
power of a higher affection. It is 
not merely a moral influence but 
shows us the best and only way to 
find God. The Ritualist and the ma- 
terialist cannot understand Christ. 
No single interpretation is sufficient. 
The Cross is many sided. Sacrifice 
is the key to self-realization, and 
self-sacrifice is the only way to live 
up to Christ's sufferings. 



Dr. Wright Attends Meet- 
ing of Western Philo- 
sophical Ass'n. 

President Wright left yesterday to 
attend the Nineteenth Annual Meeting 
of the Western Philosophical Associa- 
tion at the State University of Iowa. 
Iowa City, Iowa. The session will last 
two days, the ISth and 19th of April. 
The Address of the President, "The 
Social Purpose of Education," will be 
made by Dr. Wright. The honor con- 
ferred upon Dr. Wright as the presi- 
dent of this important philosophical 
association is shared and appreciated 
by the whole college. 



in the history of the Y. W. C. A. The 
following cabinet has been chosen: 

Treasurer Sara Fisher 

Secretary M. Mills 

Membership R. Armstrong 

Information Bea Worthly 

Social Margaret Horton 

Missionary E. Wise 

Social Service H. Harris 



Mr. Troutnian Addresses 
Y. M. C. A. Meeting 

The regular bi-weekly meeting of the 
college Y. M. C. A. was held last Thurs- 
day evening in the Digamma Fraternity 
rooms in Harlan Hall. Prof. Troutnian 
was the speaker of the evening, his 
talk being along the line of various 
mistakes and errors that the average 
college man makes while in school. It 
was filled with good personal advice, 
and was a very interesting and instruc- 
tive address. 

The next meeting will be held on 
Thursday evening. April 24th, in the 
Omega l'si Fraternity rooms in Black- 
stone Hall. All men are urged to be 
present at this meeting. 



Theta Psi Entertains at Tea 

Last Thursday afternoon the Theta 
Psi Sorority entertained very delight- 
fully at tea. A good time began the 
minute the guests entered the room and 
everyone regretted when the hour for 
departure had arrived. 

The wonderful food and the success 
of the girls as hostesses made the party 
one of the most successful of the 
season. The guests were Mrs. E. J. 
Mather. Mrs. Hattie Hall Knox, Miss 
Hamilton, Miss Powell, Harriet Harris. 
Ruth Stommel, Lillian Evans, Lydia 
Sprecher and Eloise Brown. 



166 



THE STBNTOR 



Is That So? 

Thayer in English— I have two sub- 
jects about which I could speak; they 
are French women and Prohibition. 
( tn looking over the class, I feel that I 
had better talk on Prohibition. 



Thayer while discussing Prohibi- 
tion — We got this country from the 
Indians and after JULY FIRST you 
can give it back to them as far as I 
am concerned. 



To the- Editor of "Is That So'.'"— Is 
it ail right for a young man who has 
been going with a I.ois Haller, and who 
is now campused to have a date with a 
Ferry Haller. 

Innocent One. 
' Dear Innocent < hie — It is all right for 
yen lo have a date with your Ferry, if 
you stay away from the vicinity of Lois 
Hall. I think that it would be very 
embarrassing to both of you. should the 
young lady of your first choice see you 
with your Ferry. 



The following is the result of the 
Mable Sykes' productions in last Sun- 
day's WORLD'S GREATEST NEWS- 
PAPER : 

33rd and Track, New York, 
March 14, 1919. 
1 'ear Kid : 

1 seen your map in de sunda Trib 
and take it from one what knows and 
has had the experience with skoits that 
it don't look like no Sahara desert for 
•mo. Any time that yous gets tired of 
them BLUE LAWS and you wants to 
change your pasture, Spike Spivins has. 
always got a place at his mahogany 
fi r you* Kid, yous sure is a knock out 
in the first round and me what never 
took the count before hail 'em spongin' 
mi- contour and sprayin" me with am- 
monia de minit I claps me peckers on 
dat bewitching map of yours. Say de 
woird ami a railroad ticket is yours by 
next mail and il won't be no round trip 
i Lther. 

Yours till the gong. 
Spike Spivins, 1-35 pound Champeen. 

The University of Chicago girls are 
planning to get the pictures of their 
host lookers in the local papers, in 
order lo keep their young men from 
g.iing to Lake Forest College. 



The Music School Law and order 
I eague have campused .Tack Reese for 
two weeks. 



Eila Louise if you would turn that 
skirt upside down, you would choke 
lo death. 



Music School Notes 

Stentor won't get no news from us 

this week 
Unless our heads we puzzle, scratch, 

and seek 
To find some foolish thing to fill this 

space, 
There just ain't been no happenings 

'round this place, . 
( inly the usual round of work plus 

work. 
And jolly stolen moments when we 

shirk. 



Dorothy Rosyue Antrim was pleas- 
antly surprised Thursday evening when 
some of her friends happened in to help 
celebrate her 'teenth birthday. 



The Deerpath Inn, it made a sign. 
All on a summer day. 
The College boys they stole that sign. 
And with it ran away. 

The signs of springtime we admit. 
Are mostly very cunning. 
Hut this most special sign, we thought, 
i Hi well, 'twas somewhat stunning. 



We wonder why April is the laziest 
month. 

"Because everyone is tired after a 
March of thirty-one da vs." 



Sunday affen n the Music School 

entertained the faculty of Ferry Hall 
at coffee in honor of Miss Anna E. 
Hohnan. who will soon sail for France 
to do reconstruction work with the 
Radclifl'e College Unit. 



Lieut. Bob Maplesden and 
Wife Visit Campus 

1 Lent, and Mrs. Robert Maplesden 
spent Hie week-end on the campus. 
Lieut. Maplesden has recently been dis- 
charged from the army and has ac- 
cepted a position with Swift anil Co. 
He left for Decatur on Sunday night, 
where lie will start work. .Mrs. Maples- 
den will join him very soon. 



Deanie! Deauie! Deanie! Deanie! 

Dean! Dean! Dean! 
Deanie! Deanie! Deanie! Deanie! 

Dean! Dean! Dean! 

Von see her at the fire escape, and in 

Hie hall. 
You see her when you think you 

shouldn't see her at all. 
Deanie! Deanie! Deanie! Deanie! 

Dean ! Dean ! Dean ! 



Mildred Zenos visited Theta Psi over 
the week end. 



Death of James 
Stewart '05 

Information has just reached us of 
the death. December 7, 1918, of Dr. J. 
liussell Stewart, of Colorado Springs, 
where he has lived and practiced his 
profession since 1911. We cannot do 
better than quote a portion of a letter 
from J. II. McCrea, 'OS, in regard to 
Dr. Stewart. 

"Dr. Stewart was not in the Service; 
lie made application on two different 
occasions to enter the Medical Corps, 
but was refused on account of former 
tubercular trouble. During the In- 
fluenza Epidemic here, when so many 
local physicians were away in Service, 
he gave his time and energy unstint- 
ingly, which resulted in his death. 
Since living in Colorado Springs, I had 
learned to know Dr. Stewart more in- 
timately than during our one year in 
Lake Forest together, as he was our 
physician and also a close personal 
friend. His standing in this community 
both professionally and as a man was 
of the highest." 

Dr. Stewart came to Lake Forest 
along with an interesting group of 
others, such as Ferguson, '05; Stevens, 
'Oil ; Michael, '07, and the McNitts, from 
Logansport. Ind. While in college, with 
his eye already fixed on medicine, he 
specialized in Biology and kindred sub- 
jects; a quiet man, but generally es- 
teemed and loved by those who knew 
him well. He was a member of Omega 
Psi. 

Subsequent to graduation here he 
spent four years at Johns Hopkins 
Medical School, winning such approval 
for his work there that he was ap- 
pointed a resident physician detailed 
for special work at the Xew Haven 
Hospital, in connection with the Yale 
Medical School, and remained there 
eighteen months. He then located in 
Logansport as a practicing physician. 
but after two years, on account of 
tubercular trouble, was forced to seek 
another climate, first for a year at 
Saranac Lake, and finally in Colorado, 

In 3915, Dr. Stewart married Miss 
Belle Williams of Colorado Springs, 
who had been a teacher. She with one 
child, a daughter, survives him. as well 
as his parents. 



Irene Farwell attended Prom at the 
University of Illinois last week. 



Ruth Kenyon entertained Anne Siller 
a t her home in Elgin over the week end. 



THE STENTOR 



167 



A Lament 



Oh, unkind profs, what June you done? 
You've taken from lis all our fun. 
Our joy in living is no more. 
You've made a rule that makes us sore. | 

When in our coops at half past eight. 
\Ye had to go to mourn our fate. 
And cuss the moon that drove us wild. 
In accents sometimes not too mild. 

YVheti to the movies we would go 
And watch the clock through half the 

show. 
Forgetful of the heroine's fate. 
Lest we should he two minutes late. 



Jen and Mary 

Spring Poetry Awards. 

The First Prize — Fourteen Volumes of 

Evergreen Anthology. 

Awarded to Beth Thayer. 



PRIZE POEM 

• Hi. my mamma, my mamma, my 
aristocratic mamma, 

Bacon for breakfast, steak for dinner, 
cake at supper time. 

Pats of butter every meal — and some- 
times hutterine. 

Oh, my mamma, my mamma, my 

aristocratic mamma. 
If you're like the rest, you will like | 

your mamma best. 
For we're all at Lake Forest now ! 



Alma Maters Mother 
Goose 

L. F. had a litle rule, 

Some found it hard to keep. 

And every time they left the school. 

Some one was sure to peep. 

How the dean did bawl them out. 
Exposing every lib. 
And all the rest without a doubt. 
Is found in the Daily Trib. 



Mrs. Armstrong has returned to her 
home in Ottumwa, Iowa, after a short 
visit with Mason and Rebecca Arm- 
strong. 



When on a .Sunday evening fine. 

Some swains would ask us out to dine. 

At Red's — or even at the Inn, 

We'd swallow the food and hurry in. < >'»• m J" Papa, my papa, my democratic 

papa, 
We didn't mind so much— we knew \ Checks for breakfast, checks for din- 
Our suitors, trusty, tried, and true ner ' checks for supper time. 



Would try to help us all they could. 
At least they'd come and bring us food. 

When down below a whistle we'd hear. 
Twould sound like music to the ear. 
The waste basket out of the window 

we'd hustle 
With many an anticipating rustle. 

Those hamburger sandwiches — heaven's 

invention ! 
From Luthe*'s — Oh. profs, let me call 

your attention 
To them if never you've eaten them 

hot, 
They may be plebian — but they do hit 

the spot. 

And now your new rule — cb>st know 

what you've done? 
You've ruined it all — life's one joy is 

gone — 
We bate to complain and to crab and to 

fuss. 
But change places with us — now 

wouldn't you cuss? 



Automobiles to ride about and lights 
nil all the time. 

()h. my papa, my papa, my democratic 
papa, 

If you're like the rest you will like 

your papa best. 
I'm- we're all at Lake Forest now! 



Sigma Tan entertained Marjorie 
Etnyre, ex-'IS and Delia Babcock. ex- 
'10. over the week end. 



I 'mm. gee, wonder how it feels to be 
a famous beauty patronized by the 
World's Shadiest Newspaper? And 
wasn't it too bad that Rea and Jin 
didn't have their pictures in Mabel's 
hands'.' Leave it to Sykes to put you 
across! Patronize our advertisers! 



<>! tell me not in mournful numbers 

that it rains again. 
For the love of horseradish and 

apoplexy — 
Where did I put my tins? 



Vera Pettigrew and Beth Thayer 
spent the week end at home in Chicago. 



TO A CANNED PEACH 

Oh. blushing peach that once was fair, 

Thou art half-cousin to the pear! 
And to ye both 

We sing our praise — 
In voices of despair! 

<lh. apricot so pale and thin. 

Thou hast thy being in a tin : 
And every day 

'This thou, or peach, or pear 
I hate thee all like sin! 

R. M. II. 



THE 

CLARK 

TEACHERS' 

AGENCY. 

30TH YEAR. 



VACANCIES for SEPTEMBER lit SALARIES 

larger than ever before offered 

ONE REGISTRATION PERMANENT 

FOR ALL OFFICE'S 

CHATTANOOGA. 
CHICAGO NEW YORK BALTIMORE. MD. TENN. 

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N. Y. Life Bldg. Exchange Bank Bldg. Chamber of Commerce Bldg. 



Sport Cloths, Cricket and 

Tennis 

Flannels in Abundance 




DEPENDABILITY — 

As to the length of life and 
resiliency of the fabrics, and 
as to the construction of 
your clothes — 

IS WHAT COUNTS 

That's why we put all our 
knowledge into buying the 
Right Sort of Fabrics — 
Fabrics of the finest tex- 
tures and of the latest 
weaves — 

That's why we devote our 
utmost skill in tailoring — 
so as to express gracefully 
the lines of your figure — 

so that the clothes will re- 
tain that Air of Distinction 
which is soon lost in less 
perfect clothes. 
THESE are the qualities 
that make JERREMS' 
clothes so desirable — so de- 
pendable. 

Prices $40, $45, $50 
and upwards 



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Tailor for Young Men 

T hree Stores: 

7 North La Salle St. 

314 S Michigan Ave. 

7 1 E. Monroe St. 



168 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 
Lillian Evans, '19. 
Harriet Harris, '19. 
Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 
Lydia Sprecher, '19. 
Ruth Stominel, '19. 
Eleanor Goble. '21. 

Business Managers: 
Agnes Hoffman, '19. 
Margaret Horton, '19. 

Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 
Paul Offenheiser, '21. 
Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 
Horace Horton. '20. 
Howard Wood, '22. 
Raymond Moore, '21. 

Professor W. R. Bridgeman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at tlie postoffice of Lake For- 
est. Illinois, as second-class matter. 



Ni» ONE lias much energy these 
days. We are all rather pepless 
and spring feverish. On the 
north side of the campus the most 
strenuous activities seem to be knitting 
sweaters and scarfs and taking in the 
delights of the village, especially feat- 
uring Kraft's delicacies. 

Now. none of us care to be called 
Calamity Janes but the fact is that 
must of us need a word of admonition 
about putting more effort on our work 
and less on things of little consequence. 

At the beginning of each term every- 
one usually vows to keep up his daily 
work in order not to be completely 
swamped when exam, time comes. A 
lot of us have failed in this resolve 
in the last two quarters. Are we going 
to fail again and spend the last few 
days at the end of this term in constant 
worry over those diabolical exams 
which must be met and conquered? 
Each time the old will comes to the 
rescue and makes us accomplish what 
we should the task becomes easier. Less 
effort is required and we may even 
become habitually studious. It is said 
that this brings real pleasure. Don't 
anybody over work. Keep your health 
but also keep up your grades! 



EASTERTIDE and all that it 
means is upon us. The great- 
est and most symbolical Easter 
of all the ages. This Resurrection 
time finds the whole world starting 
out on a new life — a new life of 
democracy. The great world war is 
over and has left us the wiser in 
three ways at least. It has taught 
us that the way to earnestness of 
purpose is through unity and co- 
operation; that we each have a 
sacred duty to mankind: and. what 
is most encouraging, that heroism is 
not so uncommon as we thought. 

Particularly is it a symbolical 
Easter for us. All eyes are turned 
towards America and America in 
turn looks to her college men and 
women for initiative. It is for us 
therefore to work forward earnestly 
in unity and cooperation, forward 
to ideal democracy. 

An ideal democracy can only be 
brought into existence when every 
individual fully realizes his duty to 
mankind. When every one realizes 
that it is his sacred duty to the 
world to live an honest, well-rounded, 
wholesome life. America is looking 
to her college men and women for 
initiative. Therefore let us start 
now. this Easter time, to do our share 
towards building this ideal demo- 
cracy — start now to fulfill our duty 
to society. 

It is not very easy to do this as is 
the case in performing most of our 
duties but let us take heart from the 
third lesson the war has taught us 
and develop that heroism, this is 
latent within ourselves. Let us have 
our resurrection time now this Easter- 
tide. 



In the Sweet By and By 

We wonder if we'll live to see the 
day when — 

Maliciously intended prayers like 
those of "The Campused Maiden" are 
not answered. 

Miss Hamilton makes a faux pas. 

Philip says a kind word. 

Lake Forest College cannot gain 
newspaper ' publicity. 

Professor Van can be taken seriously. 

Peg hasn't something up her sleeve 
(besides her arm). 

Ruth and Elsie stay out again. 

Ken and l last name contains 

four letters) cease to scrap. 

(Whisper, whisper) and Ibz-bzz) 
break up — Fooled again. Ton thought 
we meant Flora and Tommy but we 
didn't — Eh huh. Jenny and Ote. 

The happy meeting occurs between 
certain unfortunate law breakers and 



The History of 

Philosophy Class 

On questions of Philosophy, 
Math, or Trigonomatry 
Shining Ernest Coberly 
Almost answers soberly. 



On Leibniz, handsome Jerry Downs 
Doesn't smile but always frowns 



Now I think I'll have to tell 

Of the dizzy guy, Speidel. 

I hear his answers, clear and trite 

Say to myself, "The book is right.' 



When Psyche turns his eagle eye 

On Johnny Rees and asks him 

"Why?" 
Johnny then is ill at ease 
And feels a quaking in his knees. 



On Hume or Berkeley, Warren 

Schreurs 
Talks as if he'd had some beers. 



On shimmie, schwabble or tickle toe, 
There's nothing Hoover doesn't know 
But on Descartes our dancing Kit 
Has knowledge which is almost nit. 



Army loves a girl called Delia 
She thinks he is quite a fella. 
But she'd get an awful shock 
If she heard him bluff on Locke. 



The only girl in class is Massey 

So pardon me if I assume 

Though she's pretty, sweet, and 

classy, 
She's got lots to learn of Hume. 



If asked of Bacon, Locke, or Hobbes 
Taylor hands out bunk in gobs 
But we feel constrained to say 
He's faking almost every day. 

"Doc" O'Leary, Freddie and Jim- 
my Bates, and Don Kinsey were week- 
end guests of Digamma. 



l.overidge Martin and Myron Thayer 
were week-end guests of friends in 

Chicago. 



their respective fellow sufferers who 
have remained faithful through the 
ordeal. 

Hotel Lois Hall becomes a Home — 
( Old Peoples'. Foundlings' or something 
el se I . 

Anybody has a grudge against "Baby 
Annie." 

All these fair blossoms burst forth 
(you think we refer to flowers, you're 
not so far wrong. They are — some of 
them — spring beauties) in the results 
of the late knitting craze. 



THE STENTOR 



168 



Ray Mac Allister '20 

With U. S. Troops 

In Russia 



1915. Ray Earl MacAllister of Oconto, 
Wis., enlisted at Fort Sheridan in Hay, 
1917. He received the commission of 
First Lieutenant in August, and was 
sent to Battle Creek, Camp Custer, 
where he was appointed Adjutant. In 
•July. 1918. he was sent overseas to 
England, and later to Archangel, Rus- 
sia, where he landed September 5, 1918. 
He is still in service there with the S5th 
Div., 339th Inf.. and makes a most 
urgent plea for letters. 

"I know you must be curious as to 
the kind of a country I am in and I 
am going to try and give you a slight 
idea of what things are like up here. 
In the first place you asked me if it 
was cold. Tes. extremely so. You see 
we are only about 68 miles south of 
the Arctic Circle and in a region where 
it is cold most of the year around, 
though a different kind of a cold than 
we have back in the States, very dry. 
hardly any moisture in the air at all. 
The last few days it has been about 35 
degrees below, but today it is some 
warmer though snowing a little bit. 
The snow has been with us since last 
November steady, with never a melt- 
ing spell of any kind and there will be 
none until about May and at that time 
the Dvina River and White Sea will 
lie the worst of any season of the year. 



Simply full of icebergs which will make 
navigation practically impossible. 

"The town I am stationed in has a 
population of anywhere from 40.000 to 
100,000 people, but no one seems to 
know just how many are here, because 
of the great number of refugees from 
the interior of Russia. It is sure a 
queer place and nothing like anything 
I have ever seen in America. The 
streets are unpaved and in the summer 
a veritable swamp hole, and like riding 
on a roller coaster if you get in a 
'Proski' for a ride. They have a sort of 
a 2 x 4 street car line which runs 
down the main street and which smells 
like one of the Armour's Meat Houses. 
Really. I never saw such people, seem 
to be going some place all the time, but 
where it can be is more than I know. 
They always get on with a big meat 
basket, a roll of clothes, a baby carriage 
or most anything. It is nothing more 
than a passenger and baggage car com- 
bined and if you wish to ride on it you 
simply have to put up with it or get 
oft'. The first week we were here they 
went on a strike, so some of our men 
ran the cars and charged no fares at 
all. so they decided they had better get 
on the job or they would be out wages 
and everything. We even published 
one of their papers for them for a 
while. The buildings are more or less 
a queer architecture and the great 
majority of them are built out of logs. 
Some of the buildings are somewhat 
modern, but have gone to waste con- 
siderably and they are not being re- 
paired any to speak of. Conditions 



were horrible when we first came in. 
no food to speak of and what there 
was. was sky high, so the poor people 
were suffering terribly. You see the 
Bolsheviks had only been driven out 
about four weeks previous to our 
arrival and they carried off everything 
they could carry with them. Now. we 
have the people on rations and they are 
pretty well satisfied, though as a whole 
they are pretty lazy and would rather 
sleep and drink tea than do anything 
else. Cigarettes were worth a 'Ruble' 
a piece (10c) and as the people had 
a world of money our 'Yank' was soon 
making money pretty fast, but he paid 
just as much for everything he wanted 
to buy from them. The town stretches 
along the Dvina River, which runs in 
from the White Sea. but is very nar- 
row, as the outskirts are nothing but 
swamps. It is really divided into three 
parts. Archangel. Solombola a n d 
Smolny. 

"As to military operations I can tell 
you nothing, except that Americans 
are on a fighting front and probably 
will be for some time longer, but every 
one is making the best of it and trying 
to put up with so many things that are 
strange to us. 

"I am now in command of Head- 
quarters Company due to some change 
in the regiment and I am really very 
comfortable anil the men also. I am 
studying Russian in my spare time and 
making some progress in it. but 
whether I will ever speak it all de- 
pends on my ability to persevere to the 
end.'' 




The Original 

"Mable Sykes" 

DIAMOND MEDAL -:- ARTIST -:- PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 

140 North State Street 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts ) 

Established at present location since 1906 

MAKER OF HY- CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 

Phone Central 5341 



170 



THE STBNTOR 





STYLES THAT 


PLEASE 


for 


COLLEGE MEN 


and WOMEN 


RASMUSSEN BROS 


. BOOT SHOP 




Market Square 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 




The dailvj use of 

KOSMEO CREAM 

and 

KOSMEO POWDER 

and a weekly visit to 

Mrs. Graham's 
Deautij Shop 

1432 Stevens Bldg. 

will create a perlect 

complexion. 

TRY IT. 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsfcy 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Fjuilding 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision 'Dealers 



Grocery 



Market 



807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 

Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



use BOWMANVS safe milk 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-109 Vine Ave. 



New Service List 
Being Completed 

(Cont. from last week.) 

LIEUT. KEITH JONES. '10 

HMO. Keith Jones, 5422 Kenniore Ave.. 
Chicago, enlisted in the R. O. T. C. May 
12. 1917. at Ft. Sheridan. He was 
transferred to aviation June 10th, and 
went to the U. S. Aviation School at 
Champaign, 111., for preliminary train- 
ing. He was detailed to Toronto, 
Canada, attached to the British Royal 
Flying Corps, finished his training with 
the Canadians at the southern fields of 
Everman and Hick. Fort Worth, Texas, 
and was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant 
on Xovember 22, 1917. He was sent 
overseas to England the following April, 
and was finally assigned to night flying 
with a British active service squadron. 
He reports this work to have been "in- 
teresting and sometimes exciting, hut 
that was all.'" In December. 1018. he 
returned to the United States ami 
received his discharge on January 0. 
1010. He received the commission of 
1st Lieutenant in England on Septem- 
ber lltb. 

LIEUT. FOREST E. McKEE. '15 

1915. Forest E. McKee, of Dublin. 
Indiana, enlisted at Fort Benj. Harri- 
son in August. 1017. He received a 
commission of 2nd Lieutenant at the 
Officers' Training Camp there, was sent 
to Camp Custer in December, 1017, and 
later, in July. 1018. overseas to 
Archangel, Rusia, where he is at present 
with the 339th Reg. Infantry. 

LIEUT. EARL H. DEVANNY, '10 

1916. Earl Harurum Devanny, 230 S. 
Kickapoo St., Lincoln, 111., enlisted in 
the Aviation Section. Signal Corps, at 
I'rincteon. New Jersey, on December 5, 

1917. He was graduated from the U. 
S. S. SI. A. at the Univ. of Illinois, 
April 28, 1018, and was sent to Camp 
Dick. Dallas. Texas, where he saw 
Hughes, Brayto, and Wenban. He 
went to Eberts Field. Lonoke, Ark., 
where he received his commission as 
2nd Lieutenant on September 3rd. He 
acted as Corps d'Arrues pilot at Call 
Field, Wichita Falls, Texas, and Lang- 
ley Field, Hampton, Va., and was dis- 
charged at the latter field on December 
12, 101S. In January, 1919, he returned 
to the Princeton Theological Seminary 
to complete the work interrupted in 
1917. 



THE STENTOR 



171 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

EXPRESSMAN | 

Special Attention Given to Stude nts $ 



TELEPHONE ] 
NUMBERS I 



Residence 675 
Office 384 



The V^fuality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Dr. G. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

12:10 m. 5:0U p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



llllllllli!l!l!!illlllllll!llll!llllllllllli;illlllllllllllll!ll!IIM 

/^LASS Pins and Rings. 
^-^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 
SPIES BROS. 2 J £ TcTgo 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 



■I! 

/^y For Light 

f t/TC For Heat 
V^l^O for Power 

North Shore Gas Co. 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor^Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusive 
Dry Goods Store 

9 




^/fSfiqpJbr 

'Womens&Childrens Furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



WILLIAM VICKET CUTLER. 17 

1917. William Vic-key Cutler. 2S06 
13th St., X. E.. Washington. D. C, went 
to France in May. 1918, with Base 
Hospital Unit Xo. 117. as instructor in 
Agriculture to convalescent soldiers. 
This hospital was a "shell shock" hos- 
pital near Domremy. He is still in 
Prance. 



LIEUT. HUGH MAPEESDEN, 17 

1917. Hugh James Maplesden, 7604 S. 
Union Ave.. Chicago, enlisted May 3, 

1918, and was sent to Camp McArthur. 
Texas, where he was promoted to a 
corporalship. On August 10, 1918, he 
left for overseas duty and entered the 
Officers" Training School at Langres, 
France, in October, 1918. He was 
graduated, qualified for a 2nd Lieuten- 
ancy. He is at present at a casual at 
St. Aignan Camp, France. 



FRANK L. GRIFFITH. '18 

1918. Frank Leslie Griffith of Sheldon. 
111., enlisted in the First Officers' Train- 
ing Corps at Fort Sheridan, 111. He 
was later transferred to Air Service as 
cadet, received his training at the 
ground school. Austin. Texas, and at 
Gerstner Field. Lake Charles, La., and 
received a commission of Pursuit Pilot 
and left for France in October. 191S. 
He received his discharge January 20, 

1919. Mr. Griffith's present address is 
1946 Sunnyside Ave.. Chicago. 



FRED B. JAXSEN, 'IS 

1918. Fred P.. Jansen, enlisted in the 
navy May 3, 1917, at Great Lakes, 111. 
At the end of four months he was put 
on the U. S. S. Essex for ten months. 
On June 3. 191S, he received the com- 
mission of Assistant Paymaster and 
was sent to Philadelphia as District 
Insurance Officer of the Fourth Xaval 
District where he expects to be for at 
least six months longer. 



SERGEANT CHARLES E. BROWX, '18 

191S. Charles Edwin Brown, Hamil- 
ton, Ohio, enlisted in the army on 
November 16, 1917, at Jolier. 111. He 
was a First Class Sergeant. Co. D., 28 
U. S. Engineers, at Camp Meade, Mary- 
land, and in June. 1918. was sent over- 
seas. He is still in France and at 
present is touring the country with an 
Army Company giving entertainments. 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Ruth Kennedy has returned to the 
campus after a short illness. 



Gladys Reichert spent the week end 
at home in Chicago. 



E.-labll.JieJ 1871 



G 



eo. 



Midden dorf 
Co. 



Wholesale Produce 

73 75 W. South Water Street 
Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 1 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD. Prop. 

Phone 175 

Whs? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



lZTTTJUT Cf"V Successor to 

JVUr>Jj/L.OlV I Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. 1TRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



172 



THE STENTOR 



ilillIII!lilll»lil»lll!l!!!IPI!llli!ll!!lil!ll!!! 



IIIIIIIIIIIIII»!liIiII^ 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C, the college work for the rest of the 
year has been reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — continues 
for this year; consequently the third term opened on Tuesday, April 1. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, 111. 



llllllililllllllilllllH 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 
Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 

C. G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 
Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 

Cleaning and Pressing . $1.50 

Pressing ... . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 

WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



The 

"J 



AMES MITCHELL 
E WELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The Market Square Restau- 
rant and Tea Room 

Open 7:00 a. m. to 8:00 p. m. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ana 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



j. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Co. 

Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 

Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, APRIL 25, 1919. 



NUMBER 33 





Digamma Formal it- 
a Wonderful Party 

Dance is One of Most Novel Ever 
Given at L. F. 

The Digamma Alpha Upsilon, gave 
their Biennial dance in the Institute 
last Saturday evening. It was a won- 
derful party and because it was, 
everybody had a wonderful time. 

The Institute looked like some 
fairyland with its false ceiling of yel- 
low and gold streamers laced and in- 
terlaced and with the many streamers 
that covered the walls. John Heine 
had even brought forth the priceless, 
old, old, fadded green curtains which 
are used only for special purposes. 
The yellow and gold streamers were 
also used in the rotunda and in the 
center was a real sure enough foun- 
tain with wet water pouring forth 
and live gold fish were much in de- 
mand but we were disappointed to 
hear that John Heine rates all of the 
wild animals used for decorations at 
formals. 

Another feature of the evening was 
the music given by the violinist and 
harpist during the intermissions out 
in the rotunda. It was greatly en- 
joyed and the Digammas are to be 
complimented for introducing a new 
feature which was so enjoyable. 

The punch was delicious and 
the punch table was a popular place 
all evening. Those in the receiving 
line were Miss Hamilton, Miss Milin- 
owski, Professor McNeill, Miss 
Hughes, Harold Eickhoff and Ida 
Oliver. 



Serenade is Grand 
Wind- Up to Dance 

Saturday nights' serenade came as 
a fitting conclusion to an entirely en- 
joyable and wonderful evening. We 
missed the "sax", but nevertheless 
think it was the best we've had the 
privilege to hear this year. It was 
also the one that instilled most shiv- 
ers and thrills. 

Suggestions are in order for a more 
adequate way in which to express ap- 



Dr. Wright Tells of 
Philosophy Meeting 

President Wright has returned 
from Iowa City where he has been at- 
tending a meeting of the Western 
Philosophical Association. On last 
Tuesday morning he gave a brief ac- 
count of the meeting in chapel. Two 
things especially impressed Dr 
Wright. One was the fact that the 
interest of the Association was con- 
centrated particularly on the relations 
of the individual to the state. The 
other was that the attitude of the last 
year has decidedly changed. A year 
igo the college professors in the 
Association were unanimous In em- 
phasizing the good points of our gov- 
ernment. Now they are criticising 
these institutions where it is felt such 
3riticism is needed. "This does not 
mean," said Dr. Wright, "that the 
t ajority of college professors are Bol- 
shevists, but it does mean that they 
feel that the criticism of big business 
which was begun before the war 
should continue." Another interest- 
ing fact noted by Dr. Wright was the 
number of college professors there 
present who are connected with great 
industrial and governmental enter- 
prises. 



Glee Club Sings at 
ter Service 

At the Easter morning services in 
the Presbyterian Church the regular 
choir was reinforced by the College 
Women's Glee Club. The girls sang 
"List the Cherubic Host" from Gaul's 
"Holy City". The entire service was 
most beautiful and impressive. The 
Glee Club is doing exceptionally well 
this year. Great credit is due to the 
director, Mrs. M. Bross Thomas, and 
to the president, Lydia Sprecher, for 
keeping the club up to its usual high 
standard. 



1919 Football 
Schedule Ready 

OCT. 4. N. W. U. AT EVANSTON, 
AT THE DISCRETION OF THE 
COACH. 

CCT. 1.1. W H E A T ON COLLEGE 
THERE. 

OCT. IS. OPEN. 

OCT. 25. MONMOUTH AT L. F. 

NOV. 1. BELOIT AT L. F. 

NOV. S. KNOX AT KNOX. 

NOV. 15. N. W. COLLEGE AT 
L. F. 



preciation for the serenade. Thank 
you!!!! !!! 



Easter Morning in 
Lois Hall 

One of the oldest and nicest tradi- 
tions of Lois Hall is the Easter Ser- 
vice which is given each year under 
the auspices of the Y.W.C.A. At six 
o'clock Easter morning the girls were 
awakened by Easter carols sung in 
the halls by five members of the Glee 
Club. Those singing this year were 
Margaret Horton, Lydia Sprecher, 
Anne Merner, Hazel Seguin, and Sara 
Moore. The carols were exceptional- 
ly well sung and were appreciated by 
all who heard them. 

The Easter breakfast also was es- 
pecially attractive. A color scheme 
of yellow and white was carried out 
by daffodil place cards and bouquets 
of real jonquils in the center of each 
table. The big surprise was real 
honest-to-goodness Easter eggs found 
at each plate. The Rabbit must have 
been especially busy the night before 
for he didn't forget a single girl — 
even the guests in the hall were re- 
membered. Besides the real eggs 
there were chocolate eggs and little 
candy eggs for every one. After 
breakfast a song service was held in 
the Big Room. 



174 



THE STENTOS 



Is That So? 

Framberg you can't chew the old 
weed; you had better stick to the 
old Wigleys until you are twenty one. 



If those big league scouts could 
see Speidel slide into second base, 
Ty Cobb would be looking for a job. 



The mother of one of the cam- 
pused young ladies was overheard to 
say that her daughter was restricted 
at college, her son canned from high 
school, and she feared that if she 
had another, he would be in jail. 



Twas the old time religion 

With a bit of Dublin blarney 

And the thrumming of the banjo 

In a merry roundelay. 

Tho the hearers did not know it, 

For their thoughts were filled with- 

salad, 
And its mayonnaise in play. 

All the tunes that hung as rainbows; 
With a red and golden purple 
Brought an answer from the win- 
dows, 
Like the drumming of the rain, 
But the spirits of the darkness 
Turned the prattle into silence, 
When the vagrants of the shadow 
Spoke of powderings in vain. 

W. G. Mc. 



L. G. Smith, '14, 
Returns From Overseas 

L. G. Smith, recently returned from 
IS months service overseas, paid a 
visit to Lake Forest last week end 
which was very much appreciated by 
his many friends here. 

After an unsuccessful attempt to 
enter the First R.O.T.C. at Fort Sher- 
idan in 1917, he joined the American 
Volunteer Ambulance service. 

After a brief, but thorough train- 
ing at the Ford plant in Detroit, he 
was sent overseas. 

After a fortnight participation in 
the "Balk of Paris" he was assigned 
to the S.S.U. attached to the First 
French Division near Verdun. He re- 
mained with this unit, promoted to 
the rank of Sgt., serving action on all 
the allied fronts from Arras to the 
Swiss border, until he was sent to the 
Infantry Officers Candidate school in 
Oct. 1918, where he was at the time 
of the Armistice. He then rejoined 
his unit and returned to the States 
last month, being mustered out by 
the service at Camp Lee, Va. 

Lorraine is in possession of the 
medal of volunteer service with the 
French and was recommended for the 
Croix de Guerre, though the latter 
has not come though as yet. 



That was fine dance the Digam- 
mas gave last Saturday evening, but 
oh! those colored dances. It was 
hard to find the couples unless you 
was looking for a corner; every time 
the light would strike a groupe they 
would scatter for the darkness. You 
couldn't see the chaperones to save 
you, but then, such is life. The punch 
was the punchiest punch that we 
have had in a long time. Omega Psi 
please note. 



An Escape From 
Death! 

Thrilling Mystery 

The evening was yet a peep and 
three dateless girls were wending 
their way down the lonely road to 
Lois Hall. Though the darkness had 
just fallen the night was very black 
and as they stumbled over the rocky 
road they were unable to carry on a 
conversation because of the great 
amount of concentration necessary 
for keeping their balance. 

Suddenly not far ahead of them 

there arose a prrr and rattle. 

Terrified the young women leaped . . . 
almost into the ravine. As they flew 
from its path the running board of 
a lightiess Ford brushed their skirts. 

Breathless and furious our hero- 
ines stood trembling, until finally the 
smallest but bravest of the three 
shook her fist toward the place where 
she thought the Ford might be and 
cried in a terrible voice, "Where are 
your lights? You should be ar- 
rested!" At this terrible verdict the 
Ford trembled, rattled, huskily and 
was swallowed up in the blackness. 

Completely unnerved our heroines 
covered the distance between them 
and the Hall and found comfort in 
the protection of four brick walls. 



Y. W. C. A. Meeting 
Thursday Night 

On Thursday evening an interest- 
ing Y. W. C. A. meeting was held in 
Lois Durand Hall. Margaret Horton 
sang "Hope in the Lord." Sara 
Fisher gave a short but interesting 
report of the Conference held at 
Northwestern University some time 
ago. Mildred Gerlach read an inter- 
esting selection on "Friendship." 
The attendance was very good and 
the meeting was really worth while. 



Death of Rev. 

John Neville Figgis 

Formerly Bross Lecturer at 
Lake Forest 

Died on Sunday, April 13, Rev. 
John Neville Figgis, D. D., Litt. D., 
who is well remembered as having 
delivered the series of lectures on 
the Bross foundation, in the Spring 
of 1915. Dr. Figgis was one of the 
best-known authorities in England 
on mediaeval and church history, and 
a distinguished intellectual figure in 
any company. 



The Senior girls were entertained 
at coffee by Miss Powell last Tuesday 
evening. 



Agnes Hoffman and Margaret Hor 
ton went bugging down at Braeside 
last Thursday. Ask them about the 

results! 



Mr. J. F. Scouller, '01, Superin 
tendent of the State Reformatory 
was to have addressed the University 
Club Thursday night, but was unable 
to come because of a serious fire in 
the Reformatory on Tuesday night. 



Dr. Howard Addresses 
Y. M. C. A. 

Dr. Howard, an old student of Lake 
Forest College and now Professor 
of Philosophy at Northwestern Uni- 
versity addressed a meeting of the 
Y. M. C. A. in the Omega Psi rooms 
last night. We hope to give a more 
detailed account of the meeting next 
week. 



Lieut. Davis, '19, Tells of 
Argonne Fight 

On last Wednesday morning Lieut. 
Chester Davis, '19, gave one of the 
most Interesting chapel talks we 
have had this year. He told of his 
experiences in the Argonne where he 
was severely wounded. Davis was 
in the American attack which began 
on November 1st and he described 
most vividly the formation and na- 
ture of a barrage. Unfortunately he 
received his wounds soon after the 
beginning of the great attack and 
spent several months in a hospital 
in France before returning to the 
United States in March. 



THE S T E N T O U 



175 



Alumni Notes 

1916. Lieut. R. R. Maplesden has 
now transferred to the Swift & Co. 
army, and after a brief course in 
Chicago is now stationed at the Deca- 
tur plant, "Still a student and also 
ladies' maid to some 40,000 chick- 
ens." 

1917. John M. Hawes has accepted 
a position with a printing house at 
Waterloo, Iowa; address 303 High 
St. 

191S. Arthur H. Franzen of Itasca, 
111., spent the years 1917 and 1918 in 
Manitoba in the wheat ranching busi- 
ness and expects to spend the summer 
of 1919 there also. His address is 
Pierson, Man. During the winter of 
191S-19 he was the office manager of 
Morris & Co., State Street Branch in 
Chicago. 

1918. Zoltan Irshay, this year's 
Lake Forest fellow at the University 
of Illinois, is majoring in Philosophy, 
with minors in Psychology and Edu- 
cation. The subject for his thesis 
in connection with candidature for 
an M. A. degree is "The Distinguish- 
ing Characteristics of Pragmatism." 
He has been preaching on Sundays, 
and is now carrying on services in a 
mining town near Danville. 

191S. We have recently heard in- 
directly that Sam Isa is still in the 
British Army in Cambridge, Eng- 
land. He plans to visit his home in 
Bagdad after his discharge. 

191S. Felix Beauchamp was, at last 
accounts, with the R. F. C. and ex- 
pects to remain in that service in 
England for some time. 

1920. Henry T. McMaster has ac- 
cepted a position in the engineering 
department of the Idaho Sulphur 
Mines and is just leaving for Idaho. 
His permanent address remains for 
a time 821 Larkin Ave., Elgin. 

1920. Howard Emsley Irwin, 2100 
Grove Ave., Quincy. 111., was a mem- 
ber of the S. A. T. C. at Northwest- 
ern during the fall of 191S. He is 
continuing his study there now. 



Jen and Mary 

Wanted — a reliable competent teach- 
er who can explain the difference be- 
tween chemise and schemes. 

Apply in person — Jack Rees and 
Russel Rice. 



C. Mather — Well, heard you had some 
little dance — fish and flowers n'every- 
thing. 

Z. Farwell — Yes indeed, looks like 
sunflowers, doesn't it? 
C. Mather — I'd say brown-eyed Su- 
sans. 

Z. Farwell — Well that's all right, I'd 
rather be a brown-eyed Susan than a 
ragged batchelor's button. 
Exit Chas. 



We're praying for you all right 
Ray — You need it worse than we do! 



Little fishes in the pool 
Johnny bring them up to school 
Di Gams have them at the dance, 
How they tickle-toe and prance! 

Signed A. Nonny Muss. 



Weep with- me all ye numb skulls, 
No. 414967 in the last edition of 

Potre de frosshe 



Where the rippling waters flow 
And the cool, green cresses grow, 
There they laid her in the shade 
Of tlie maples in the glade. 

When the evening sun was low, 
In the lingering after glow 
Hoary villagers repeated 
Her sad story. 

She had loved, but loved in vain 
Even as the fair Elaine; 
And had died without much pain 
Of a bunion on the brain. 



Personals 



Lorraine G. Smith and Leon Mc- 
Ferran were week-end guests of 
Phi Pi. 



"Deak" Henshaw and "Doodles" 
Carr were recent visitors at Kappa 
Sigma house. 



Wm. Wilson. "Doc" O'Leary, and 
Fred Jansen visited Digamma over 
the week-end and attended the Dig- 
amma formal given Saturday evening. 



Howard Dickey, ex-2 2, was a visi- 
tor on the campus this week. 



Suggestion for Enny Frosh 

Beginning lines for a Eulogy: 
"Her lover was a handsome brute 
He wore a seven dollar suit." 



See Jen for other hints- 
Closing lines 75. 



-25c and up. 



THE 
CLARK 

TE\CUi;itS ' 
AGBXCY. 



30TH YEAR. 



VACANCIES for SEPTEMBER nt SALARIES 

larger than ever before offered 

OXE REGISTRATION PERMANENT 

FOR ALL OFFICE'S 

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N. Y. Life Bldg. Exchange Bank Bldg. Chamber of Commerce Bldg. 



Sport Cloths, Cricket and 

Tennis 

Flannels in Abundance 



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As to the length of life and 
resiliency of the fabrics, and 
as to the construction ot 
your clothes — 

IS WHAT COUNTS 

That's why we put all our 
knowledge into buying the 
Right Sort of Fabrics — 
Fabrics of the finest tex- 
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weaves — 

That's why we devote our 
utmost skill in tailoring — 
so as to express gracefully 
the lines of your figure — 
so that the clothes will re- 
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which is soon lost in less 
perfect clothes. 
THESE are the qualities 
that make J E R R E M S ' 
clothes so desirable — so de- 
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Tailor for Young Men 

Three Stores: 

7 North La Salle St. 

314 S. Michigan Ave. 

71 E. Monroe St. 



176 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 
Lillian Evans, '19. 
Harriet Harris, '19. 
Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 
Lydia Spreeher, '19. 
Ruth Stommel, '19. 
Eleanor Goble, '21. 

Business Managers: 
Agnes Hoffman, '19. 
Margaret Horton, '19. 

Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 
Paul Offenheiser, '21. 
Eugene VV. Tucker, '21. 
Horace Horton, '20. 
Howard Wood, '22. 
Raymond Moore, '21. 

Professor W. R. Bridgeman 
Faculty and Alumni. 

Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, ns second-class matter. 



ALMOST anybody can keep up. 
It is those who keep ahead that 
attract attention. It is to no 
man's credit that he trail along with 
the procession. The fellow who gets 
out in front, whether plodding his 
way thru a forest or on some mission 
in the conduct of business, is the fel- 
low to be commended. 

This is likewise true of a commu- 
nity or town, and may well be ap- 
plied to our own college community, 
which should work for the best in- 
terests of the institution. Nearly all 
the colleges today are keeping up 
and are still alive or at least give 
that appearance; but we often won- 
der why it Is that some push ahead 
and lead the throng of strug- 
gling institutions of learning. It is 
because its students, its professors, 
and its trustees are the kind who 
desire to push ahead, and unmind- 
ful of their selfish interest, co-operate 
with each other to secure those things 
that are most advantageous to the 
college community. 

Lake Forest has always managed 
to stay on the top round, but there 
Is still chance for improvement — 
chance for the University to forge 
ahead just a "wee bit" anyway, and 



lead the general throng. "How may 
this be done," you say. 

Well, when a stranger enters our 
gates, speak a good word for the col- 
lege, and for each and every profes- 
sor and student. It is but little for 
you to do, but it is rich in the fruits 
of after years. If you cannot con- 
scientiously do that, you can at least 
keep still. Every community such 
as ours is judged by the words and 
acts of its people, and we of this 
community are judged by others in 
like manner. If the hearts of our 
students and professors as well were 
warmed more by the fires of com- 
radeship and brotherly love our acts 
will be in accord with our feelings, 
and the world will know us as a col- 
lege community of honor and integ- 
rity, as a people with a soul, as a 
place worthy of a future. 

But, if we loosen the floodgates of 
criticism and abuse and belittle the 
college and Its people, then in time 
we will descend to a level which we 
create ourselves, and the outside 
world will know us as a people whom 
it is well to let alone. 

In thinking over our prospects for 
next year, let's try to speak a good 
word. You need it, they need it, and 
the college needs us all. 



ONLY six weeks of this college 
year are ahead of us, but with 
a little serious thought and 
then earnest effort a great deal 
could be accomplished in Lois Hall 
before wo bid each other a fond 
farewell for the summer months. 
It is rumored that steps are being 
taken to remodel the self-government 
constitution, and we have it on good 
authority that a very capable commit- 
tee is making an effort to solve what- 
ever problems of dissatisfaction there 
may be in the Hall, and also that the 
Dean is in hearty favor and co- 
operation. 

If this is true, might it not he well 
for all those who have criticised or 
complained in the past, (and this 
number no doubt amounts to the sum 
total of Lois Hallers) came forth now 
not only with the criticism, but with 
some suggestion for improvement. If 
we are to have a model dormitory with 
the greatest amount of freedom and 
privilege and with the least possible 
amount of restriction we must have 
the hearty and friendly cooperation 
of every girl in the Hall. Things look 
more promising now than they have 
ever looked and it wouldn't be sur- 
prising if the last weeks of this year 
would prove to be only a sample of 
the model spirit and conditions which 



CALENDAR 

For the Pa9t Week 

Saturday — All in a rush for the 
Digam formal. Trombonist squash- 
ed in the rush. 

Sunday — General exodus to church. 
College Choral Club make a hit. 

Monday — Horton takes his flivver 
out for an airing. 

Tuesday — Rumors of an Omega Psi 
formal. Wild rush for the post- 
office. 

Wednesday — "Spuds" visits the Old 
Elm Club. Makes application for 
membership, and files his income 
tax papers. 

Wednesday — John Dora distributes 
gold-fish to his friends while Dr. 
Thomas holds forth in chapel. 

Thursday — Rho Gamma confer mora 
degrees on Runkel and Thayer. 

Friday — Mudge celebrates the lift- 
ing of the ban. More benches 
ordered for Lake Park. 



Idle Thoughts of 
a Busy Ed. 

The Stentor is a lively sheet 
So full of wit and fun 
And for real news it can't be beat 
Say each and everyone. 

But did you ever stop to think 
The work behind each line? 
Why editors don't take to drink 
Is only lack of time — 

A simple poem you may see 
And may hap you approve 
And say 'tis written cleverly 
With humor interwove. 

But did you ever contemplate 
The labor of that poet? 
He may have even lost in weight 
And you would never know it. 

Full many premature gray hairs 
Have come in mine own head 
Each week are added to my cares 
Those of a Stentor Ed — 

But yet it has not been for naught, 
The toil hath its reward 
For now each time I write, I note 
It is not half so hard. 



next year will appear in Lois Hall. 
With the strong house president wo 
have and the utmost cooperation of 
every girl in the dormitory this can 
very .easily -come to- pass; - 



THE STENTOR 



177 



Confessions of a Flivver Fiend 

In ti m it i Personal Reflections of One V\ ho Knows 



I ask you, wouldn't it make you 
feel like a million to be riding in the 
opposite direction to the Hall in the 
cool of the evening and with the 
driver using only one hand — not 
that that has anything to do with it. 
Of course the fact that the car was a 
flivver and that I had to return at the 
wee small hour of eight thirty rather 
lessened my pleasure. And then af- 
ter you imagine the scene please hear 
a noise. Now there are noises and 
noises but there is no noise like that 



of L. D. H. chuckling as she took min- 
utes on me. From that I quickly 
saw myself sitting at the open win- 
dow evenings while the owner of the 
car took out other maidens for their 
health. In fact my imagination was 
so keen that I lost all interest in life 
until it was suggested we telephone. 
The farmer and family were not ex- 
actly cordial. They seemed to think 
we were escaped convicts who were 
ibout to ruin their reputation. Af- 
ter using an antiquated phone and 



of a tire giving up the ghost unless hearing all the gossip of the country 



it is the noise that the driver makes 
when he hears it. Suddenly my ima- 
gination seemed to grow strong and 
keen. I could see myself returning 1 a ride and last but not least one good 
at a late hour with one of the inmates disposition. 



side we at last got the Hall and ex- 
plained to the Dean. Then I return- 
ed to the home like atmosphere minus 



Sigma Tau entertained Lucile 
Bates, of Rushville, Delia Babcock 
and Mabel Etnyre over the week end. 



Margaret Horton entertained Mar- 
gery Miller over the week end. 



Lorraine McClay entertained her 
Father at Lois Durand Hall. 



Garnette Higbee spent the week 
end at home in Marengo, Illinois. 



Theta Psi entertained Marion Bish- 
op, and Dorothy Vandersen over the 
week end. 



Margaret Mills has returned to the 
campus after a short illness. 



Ruth Bridgman and Elsie Engel 
spent the week end in Chicago. 



Katherine Horton is enjoying a 
visit from her mother. 



L. F. Service List 

Lieut. J. L. Thomas, '12 

1912. Joe Lee Thomas,' 501 E. Spring- 
field Ave., Champaign, 111., enlisted 
it Fort Sheridan on May 25, 1917 
md entered the Second Officer's 
Training Camp there. He received 
;he commission of 2nd Lieutenant in 
November 1917 and sailed for Franca 
the next month. He served with the 
1th, 53rd and 42nd Artillery, A. E. F. 
France, and also with the French 4th 
Army in the Champagne. On July 
18, 1918 he was awarded the Croix 
ie Guerre. Lieut. Thomas received 
his discharge on March 10, 1919. 

Lieut. E. A. Hastings, '15 

1915. Edmund A. Hastings, of Ore- 
gon, 111., joined the American Ambu- 
lance Field Service in March 1917 
ind sailed for France in April. After 
i short training, he volunte«red as an 

immunition truck driver in the 
French Army. When released from 

his service he enlisted in the Ameri- 
can Army as an aviator and was in 
training from September 1, 1917 to 
February 191S, receiving the com- 
mission of First Lieutenant. He was 
assigned to the SSth Aero Spuadron 
with which he worked until the sign- 
ing of the Armistice. In October he 
was recommended for promotion and 
has since received the commission of 
Captain. Hastings is in the Army of 
Occupation, located iu Trier, Ger- 
many. 




The Original 

"Mable Sykes" 

DIAMOND MEDAL -:- ARTIST -:- PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 

140 North State Street 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts. ) 

Established at present location since 1906 

MAKER OF HY-CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 

Phone Central 5341 



178 



THE S T E N T O K 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATKS TO COLLEGES AND FRATEHNITIES 




Tne daily use of 

KOSMEO CREAM 

and 

KOSMEO POWDER 

and a weeklu visit to 

Mrs. Graham's 
Beauty Shop 

1432 Stevens Bldg. 

will create a perfect 

complexion. 

TRY IT. 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsfay 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson pudding 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision ^Dealers 



Grocery Market 

807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 
Tel. Harrison 515, 516.517 



ysQOWMAJSTS safe milk 

Perfectly pasteurized milK bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephone: Gleneoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-1C9 Vine Ave' 



Lieut. Stanley Anderson, '16 

1916. Stanley Davis Anderson, 104 
Western Ave. S., Lake Forest, en- 
listed May 1917 at Urbana, 111. He 
received the commission of 2nd 
Lieutenant at the First Officer's 
Training Camp at Fort Sheridan. 
After being at Camp Grant eight 
months he received the commission 
of 1st Lieutenant and sailed for 
France with the 86th Division. He 
was an intelligence and also a liaison 
officer. On December 23rd, 1918, he 
was made adjutant for the Provost 
Marshall General at La Rochelle and 
on March 1st entered the Beaux Arts, 
at Paris for four months. 

Lieut. Elrick B. Davis, '16 

1916. Elrick B. Davis, 191 West 
Main St., St. Charles, 111., en- 
listed August 25, 1917 and assigned 
to "E" Co., 52nd Inf. (Reg.). He 
was later sent to Chickamauga Park, 
Ga., and then to Fort Oglethorp. He 
was Acting Brigade Supply Sergeant 
in the 11th Infantry Brigade (Reg.) 
at Camp Forrest, Ga., and Camp Up- 
ton, L. I., N. Y., and on July 6, 1918, 
was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant of 
Infantry at Camp Lee, Va. He was 
assigned to Co. "L," 73rd Infantry 
Camp Devens, Mass., and is there at 
present with the 36th Infantry. 

Lieut. Robt. Maplesden, '16 

1916. Robert Randall Maplesden, 
present address c/o Produce Dept., 
Swift & Co., U. S. Yards, Chicago, 
enlisted in the 2nd Officers' Training 
Camp at Fort Sheridan, 111., August 
27, 1917, and received his commis- 
sion of 1st Lieutenant Infantry, Nov. 
27, 1917. He was sent to Camp 
Zachary Taylor, Ky., 3rd Bn., 159th 
Depot Brigade, where he remained 
until August 21, 1918, when he was 
sent overseas with the SI 4th Pioneer 
Infantry. He returned on December 
8, 1918 and was discharged in Febru- 
ary 1919 with a recommendation for 
Captain, Inf., Reserve Corps. Maples- 
den reports no casualties although 
he "passed up the salute on a Major- 
General once." 

Ralph E. Johnson, '17 

1917. Ralph Edwin Johnson, 606 
Fisher Ave., Rockford, 111., entered 
the army June 1, 1918. He was 
trained at Nogales, Ariz., and Camp 
Travis, Texas, and later sent to C. F. 
O. T. S. at Waco, Texas. While here 
he met Don Rutledge '15 and Ken- 
neth Berst, '18. Johnson received 
his discharge December 8, 1919. 



THE STENTOR 



179 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

EXPRESSMAN 1 

Special Attention G'vn to Students <T 



TELEPHONE i 
NUMBERS I 



Residence 675 
Oftice 384 



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Dentists 

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Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

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Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusioe 
Dry Goods Store 




^ WomenskChlidrens Furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



Earl C. Adams, '17 

1917. Earl Clay Adams of Oregon, 
111., enlisted at St. Louis, Mo. in June 
1917. He was in training from 
August 5, 1917 to his death, Decem- 
ber 30, 1917, first at Nevada, Mo., and 
then at Fort Sill, Okla. He was 
recommended to a corporalship just 
before he died. 



Lieut. Paul Fuller, '17 

1917. Paul Harrison Fuller, c/o M. 
W. Fuller, Fort Collins, Colo., en- 
tered the army on May 2 3, 1917 in 
Denver, Colo. He was stationed at 
Fort Logan, Colo, with the 1st Colo. 
Inf. Battalion, and later at Camp 
Kearny, Calif. He was transferred 
to the 144th Machine Gun Battalion 
as Bn. Sgt. Maj. in January 1918, 
and entered the 4th Officers' Train- 
ing School on May 15, 191S. He 
finished his training at Camp Han- 
cock, Ga. where he received the com- 
mission of 2nd Lieutenant Inf. on 
October 16, 1918 and was assigned 
to Co. 13, 2nd Group, M. T. D. — M." 
G. T. C. at Camp Pike, Ark. He re- 
ceived his discharge on January 14, 
1919. 



Edward C. Holmblad, '18 

1918. Edward Charles Holmblad, 
Hartford Ave., Aurora, III., enlisted 
in the navy on the 13th of Decmber 
1917. He was placed on inactive 
service list to complete medical 
course and internship. 



Sgt. Charles Perrigo, '19 

1919. Charles Ryder Perrigo, 3901 
Ellis Ave., Chicago, III., enlisted in 
the Air Service October 14, 1918 at 
Omaha, Nebr. He was "sent to the 
Air Service Flying School Post Field, 
at Fort Sill, Okla., and received an 
appointment as Sergeant on January 
9, 1919. "The Lord only knows" 
when he will be discharged. 



Charles W. McClellan, '20 

1920. Charles W. McClellan, 614 W. 
Moulton St., Pontiac, 111., enlisted on 
December 23rd, 1917, in Ontario, 
Canada and sailed from Halifax in 
March 1918. He went "over the top" 
many times, was badly gassed on 
September 6th and was reported as 
dead. After his recovery he returned 
to the trenches and was in the Army 
of Occupation when he was released 
to return to the States. On his 
journey home he contracted Influ- 
enza and is now in a hospital in 
England. 



L. H. W. SPE1DEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



EstabllsheJ ISil 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 
73-75 W. South Water Street 

Telephone Randolph I860 

CHICAGO 



The&t 
Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSEr?, Prop. 
Phone i 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Why? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 

Call at 
O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in N»ed of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 

KUBELSKY H ^ y " n 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicah Company 

For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at AH Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



180 



THE STENTOR 



l!II!II!IIII!llllll!llll!ilI!i|||||!!l!!!l!!!lllllll!!!ll!i 



■iiimiiiiiMiiiii 



■IliMlM^ 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

of LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C., the college work for the rest of the 
year has been reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — continues 
for this year; consequently the third term opened on Tuesday, April 1. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, HI. 




iil!;iii!llllll!lllllll!!!lllilill»l!ll[|lill!!!lilii™ 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 
SHOES 

IV e Do Repairing 

Phone 709West-rn Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 



C.G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Calud For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing ■ Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleani g and Pressing $1 50 

Pressing ... . . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

Al 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



—J 



AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The Market Square Restau- 
rant and Tea Room 

Open 7:00 a- m. to 8:00 p. m. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

and 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



j. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIhE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H, Hussey & Go. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOKEST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 




Volume XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, MAY 2, 1919. 



NUMBER 24 



Death of Lake Forest 
Trustee 

The Stentor regrets to report the 
death of one of our Trustees, Mr. 
James Viles, at St. Luke's Hospital 
ill Chicago, on April 27. Mr. Viles 
became a member of the Board of 
Trustees of Lake Forest College in 
190G, and was 64 years old in March. 
Always active and apparently in good 
health until recently, his death came 
as a great surprise. Many are the 
real friends who will sorely miss his 
genial nature and kind heart. 

Mr. Viles, after being for many 
years in the packing business, be- 
came connected with the Buda Com- 
pany in 19 2. He was intimately a 
part of Chicago's growth and pros- 
perity. 

The Stentor begs to extend to Mrs. 
Viles its respectful sympathy in the 
loss of her husband and to assure 
her that the College will remember 
him with gratitude. 



Dr. Howard Addresses 
Y. M. C. A. 

Dr. Howard, formerly a student at 
Lake Forest College, but now pro- 
fessor of Philosophy in Northwest- 
ern University, spoke at the meeting 
of the Y. M. C. A. last Thursday eve- 
ning in the Omega Psi Fraternity 
rooms. His talk was along the line 
of "Development of Personality and 
Character", especially urging the 
young men to seize their opportuni- 
ties here and make the best of the 
college life in Lake Forest. The 
meeting was one of the most success- 
ful in the year, and was a most pro- 
fitable one for the men present. 

On next Thursday evening they 
will meet with the Kappa Sigma Fra- 
ternity in Harlan Hall. 



Lillian Stephens visited relatives 
in Chicago over the week-end. 



Virginia Wales was at home in 
Rogers Park over the week-end. 



Lieut. Smith, '17 Tells of 

Work With French 

Army 

On Friday, April 2 5, Lieutenant 
Lorrain Smith, '17, spoke in chapel. 
He was able to give a more objective 
account of the war than we have 
heard before, although he was in ac- 
tive service at the front for twenty- 
two months. He described the work 
of the S. S. V., (Sectione Sanitaire 
Voluntaire) and its organization. 

In 1914 this unit which accom- 
plished such a great and important 
work was organized by Americans in 
France and funds and men were sup- 
plied from the United States. In 
the end, the French handed over to 
this organization all the work of 
transporting the wounded French 
soldiers. The S. S. V. was divided 
in sections, 30 to 40 men and 20 am- 
bulances comprising a section. A 
section was attached to each division 
and followed it from place to place. 
Fully 80% of the men in this unit 
were college men and at the end of 
the war 60% of the whole unit had 
received decoration for bravery. 
Lieut. Smith spoke with admiration 
and respect of the French people. 



Edwin Gilroy Returns 

Another Lake Forest man has re- 
turned to our midst having first re- 
ceived his discharge from the Navy. 
Edwin Gilroy who was graduated 
with the class of '18 attended the 
Officers' Material School and received 
his Ensign's Commission after which 
he was assigned to a ship. He had 
varied and interesting experiences 
on his cruise, having returned about 
a month ago, landing in Philadel- 
phia. "Pete" has many interesting 
things to tell about and it is hoped 
that we will soon be able to hear 
some of them more definitely. 



Ruth Bahlert and Beth Thayer at- 
tended a matinee in Chicago last Sat- 
urday. 



Get Your Contribu- 
tions in 

For Interscholastic Number 

A new Stentor Board will be elect- 
ed some time this month. This is 
the time for the people who want to 
make the Board next year to hand 
in their contributions. Our next is- 
sue is the Interscholastic Number. 
Get some peppy material in and 
show the high school crowd what 
you can do! 



Senior Class Decides on 
Program 

At the class meeting held April 
25th it was decided that we have 
a good rousing old time Class Day. 
A committee was appointed to take 
charge of the exercises — 

Chester Davis, Gwen Massey, Har- 
riet Harris. 

Cap and Gown Day was set for Fri- 
day, May 23 rd two weeks before 
Senior Chapel. Professor Sibley 
was chosen as the speaker of the day. 

A committee of three was chosen 
to write the class song — 

Lillian Evans, Margaret Horton, 
Ruth Stommel. 

Professor Van Steenderen was 
chosen to be the speaker of Senior 
Chapel. 

The Senior Dance Committee was 
chosen — - 

Merle McEvoy, Philip Speidel, 
Lillian Evans. 



Sara Moore spent a few days at 
home in Aurora. 



Margaret Horton has as her guest 
Mary Wash of the University of Min- 
nesota. 



Beatrice Worthley spent the week- 
end at Ottawa, Illinois. 



1S2 



THE STENTOR 



Music School Notes 

CONCERT AT INSTITUTE 
SATURDAY NIGHT. 

Last Saturday night Lake Forest 
music lovers were given an oppor- 
tunity to hear Miss Harriet Osgood, 
harpist, and Mr. William Phillips in 
a very interesting and enjoyable con- 
cert. 

Mr Phillips has a wonderful ring- 
ing baritone voice. His dramatic 
interpretation of Vachel Lindsay's 
"Congo" and his flawless diction in 
whatever language he chooses were 
especially enjoyable, as were also 
the delicate humor of "Bon jour ma 
belle" and his ease of manner and 
stage presence. Alternating delight- 
fully with the groups of songs were 
harp solos by Miss Osgood of our 
faculty. Her playing was without ef- 
fort and masterful Both artists 
responded generously with encores. 
The Music School feels justly proud 
to have musicians of the kind asso- 
ciated with it and we" hope to hear 
tl em soon again. 



Miss Milinowski gave a delightful 
Easter breakfast in honor of the Mu- 
sic School Seniors. The drive to and 
from the Moraine Hotel was a de- 
lightful feature of the occasion. 



Miss Hazel Luckow of Chicago 
spent Sunday with Lottchen Knaak. 



Magdalen Smith of Huntington, 
Indiana, one of last years music 
school girls, was the guest of the 
Music School this week. 



Francelia Smith enjoyed a visit 
from her father last Sunday. 



There's music that's new 

There's music that's old 

Some music that's ancient 

Is being retold. 

The "Harmonious Black-Smith" 

Writ long years ago, 

Is being reviewed yet 

By some folks we know. 



Money is the thing we're after 
Using any means we "hafter" 
Sewing seams and shining shoes 
In any manner that you choose 
Cause the coin's for Victory's use. 

Sitting up at night to think 
Countless ways to get the "chink" 
Hairdressing, and accompanying 
Oh, don't forget the laundering 
Only for Victory's Loan we strive 
Liberty's motto to keep alive. 



New Rules Passed by Lois Hall 
Self Government Ass'n. 



The following rules were presented 
to the House Government Association 
of Lois Durand Hall at a special 
house meeting last Monday night. 
They were unanimously adopted and 
will take the place of all the rules 
previously in force. 

A — Freshmen and Sophomores 
shall not leave Lake Forest at night 
without consulting with the Dean of 
Women. 

B — Freshmen shall not go to Chi- 
cago in the day time without some- 
one who is familiar with the city. 

C — Freshmen and Sophomores 
shall not be away from Lois Hall over 
night without consulting with the 
Oean of Women. 

1) — Chaperonage. 

1 — Freshmen may not go outside 
of Lake Forest at night without 
chaperonage satisfactory to the Dean 
of Women, except to Highland Park 
in a party of four or more. 

2 — Sophomores may go outside of 
Lake Forest at night without chaper- 
onage only by permission of the Dean 
of Women, except to Highland Park. 

3 — Freshmen and Sophomores may 
not motor either in the day time or 



at night without chaperonage satis- 
.'actory to the Dean of Women. 

4 — Juniors and Seniors may mo- 
tor unchaperoned in the day time 
ind at night in parties of four or 
more. 

5 — Freshmen and Sophomores 
shall not drive in town or attend the 
theatre or movies in the evening 
without chaperonage satisfactory to 
.he Dean of Women, except by spe- 
cial permission from her. 

6 — A chaperon is required at all 
ehearsals in the evening. 

7 — Freshmen and Sophomores 
may be out after dusk only with spe- 
cial permission. 
E — Calling hours: 
1 — Juniors and Seniors — 
Afternoons 4-5:30. 
Evenings 7:30-10. 
except Friday and Saturday, 
7:30-10:30. 
2 — All girls: 

Wednesday 3-5:30. 
Saturday, Sunday, and Holidays, 
2:00-5:30. 
3 — Underclassmen : 

Friday, Saturday 7:30-10. 
Sunday 7:30-9:00. 



Big Game Last Saturday! 


THEY 
DIDN'T know 


DID you 


\BOUT the little 


EVER hear of 


PEPPERS. 


THE little Peppers 


ANYHOW 


AND 


THEY stayed at home 


'IOW they grew? 


30 we didn't 


WELL 


SEE them 


ONCE we 


GET beat. 


HAD a lot of 


BUT we had 


PEP, 


LOTSUVPEP. 


\ND it grew, 


ANYHOW! 


UNTIL 




MOST everybody 




TURNED out 




TO see 


Music School Gives 


L. F. 
PLAY ball, 


Recital 


THAT is 


The University School of Music 


EVERYBODY in 


gave a very delightful recital at the 


T.OIS Hall 


Durand Art Institute at three-thirty- 


TURNED out. 
'STOO bad 
CRANE didn't 


Monday afternoon. The program 
was so well arranged and so well 


given that all those who were there 
will never let another opportunity 


TURN out too. 


to enjoy a recital given by the Mu- 


BUT maybe 


sic School pass by. 



THE STENTOR 



183 






at Day! 



There is one day in the week that 
I hate. I hate it with all my heart. 
Every week I hate that day. It isn't 
because I know we will have spag- 
hetti for luncheon that day. Neither 
is it because my classes for that day 
are especially hard. To most peo- 
ple that day is the same as any other 
day in the week. But not so for 
me. I know that day is coming six 
days ahead. And still when it comes 
its horror is just as bad. I am never 
ready for that day to come. Just 
once I would like to sleep through 
that day and not be bothered by it 
at all, nor reminded about it after- 
ward, nor have to dread it in ad- 
vance. How I do hate that day! I 
wonder if any one else hates it as 
I do! I hope so. Misery loves com- 
pany. I don't hate the day so much 
for itself as for what is expected of 
me on that day. I can never get out 
of doing what is expected of me that 
day. Never! It is always the same, 
for endless weeks. (Only six more — 
Ed.) Soon I will be free. Soon I 
will graduate. Then I can do as I 
please. Then on a certain day I 
will not have to write a contribu- 
tion for the Stentor. How can I 
wait until Commencement? 



Lorraine McClay spent the week- 
end with friends in Oak Park. 



Rebecca Armstrong visited friends 
in Oak Park over the week-end. 



Micky Beddoes is laid up with a 
bad eye. He was hit with a base- 
ball? 



Is That So? 

Mr. Framberg was a visitor at the 
Hotel Sherman last Saturday and 
Sunday. He hurried in after the 
first mail on Saturday. 



Mr. Hanson and Mr. Tracy were in 
the city last Saturday. They had a 
few ginger ales; it is said that they 
even chewed a stick of gum, but 
worst of all they rode home in the 
smoker with the men. . 



Mr. Davis — "My father is a very 
prominent man in St. Charles." 

Mr. Eddy — "Why is your dad so 
prominent?" 

Mr. Davis — "Because he is MY 
FATHER". 



A Few Don'ts 

DON'T come to chapel until the 
choir has started to sing; the song 
makes a good processional. 

DON'T prepare your lessons; there 
are enough bright students who will 
enlighten the prof on any question 
that he might ask. 

DON'T buy your candy when the 
book store is filled with young ladies; 
you might not have enough to go 
around. 

DON'T get to your classes too 
early; you will find that you can 
make yourself much more conspicu- 
ous by entering after the roll call. 

DON'T use the front door at Lois 
Hall when you over stay your leave; 
there is a good fire escape at the 
south end of the building which is 
to be used in all emergencies. 

DON'T get a date with a young 
lady until you have seen her soror- 
ity sisters. If they have no objec- 
tions, the coast is clear. 

DON'T laugh at your prof's jokes; 
he is apt to lower your mark, be- 
cause of your lack of seriousness. 

DON'T fail to bring your text 
books to chapel; it is an ideal place 
to study. 



THE 

CLARK 

TEACHERS' 

AGENCY. 



30TH YEAR. 



VACANCIES for SEPTEMBER at SALARIES 

larger than ever before offered 

ONE REGISTRATION PERMANENT 

FOR ALL OFFICE'S 

CHATTANOOGA. 
CHICAGO NEW YORK BALTIMORE. MD. TENN. 

64 E. Van Buren St. Flatiron Bldg. Munsey Bldg. Temple Court Bldg. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. ST. PAUL, MINN. SPOKANE. WASH. 

N. Y. Life Bldg. Exchange Bank Bldg. Chamber of Commerce Bldg. 



Oh Marsh! Tee hee! last Satur- 
day night! 



Mr. Troutman is cordially invited 
to that osculation party. 



Lady will sell large 50 in. $250 
size mahogany grand opera phono- 
graph and 200 steel needles anil re- 
cords. Used few weeks. Will take 
$74 for outfit and ship C. 0. D. on 
approval. Act quick. 
Mrs. Waverly-Brown, 317 Greenleaf 

Ave., Wilmette, 111 , near Linden 

Sta. Mil. Electric. 



Sport Cloths, Cricket and 

Tennis 

Flannels in Abundance 




DEPENDABILITY — 

As to the length of life and 
resiliency of the fabrics, and 
as to the construction of 
your clothes — 

IS WHAT COUNTS 

That's why we put all our 
knowledge into buying the 
Right Sort of Fabrics — 
Fabrics of the finest tex- 
tures and of the latest 
weaves — 

That's why we devote our 
utmost skill in tailoring — 
so as to express gracefully 
the lines of your figure — 
so that the clothes will re- 
tain that Air of Distinction 
which is soon lost in less 
perfect clothes. 
THESE are the qualities 
that make J E R R E M S ' 
clothes so desirable — so de- 
pendable. 

Prices $40, $45, $50 
and upwards 



Qiu 




^n 



*r-~ 



Tailor for Young Men 

Three Stores: 

7 North La Salie St. 

314 S Michigan Ave. 

71 E. Monroe St. 



184 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 
Lillian Evans, '19. 
Harriet Harris, '19. 
Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 
Lydia Sprecher, '19. 
Ruth Stommel, '19. 
Eleanor Goble, '21. 

Business Managers: 
Agnes Hoffman, '19. 
Margaret Horton, '19. 

Reporters: 

Sara Moore, '21. 
Paul Offenheiser, '21. 
Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 
Horace Horton, '20. 
Howard Wood, '22. 
Raymond Moore, '21. 

Professor W. R. Bridgeman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



IN what does a good editorial 
consists? Or, what is an editorial? 
By some authorities, an edi- 
torial may be called a short essay, 
giving the views of the editor on 
some subject of the day, and of espe- 
cial interest to the reader. This 
publication has no real editor, as we 
think of an editor of a newspaper, 
and if we were to give the opinions 
of the entire staff in each editorial, 
it certainly would be a "rare opin- 
ion". The editorial is very different 
from the news item which is classed 
under narration. The reporter sim- 
ply records facts without personal 
comment, whereas it is the business 
of the editor to record facts and give 
opinions, explaining where necessary, 
and commending or condemning as 
occasion requires. Newspapers usu- 
ally set forth social and political 
problems of a local or national 
character, and it is the aim of 
the editorial to shape public thought. 
But, how oh! how, can this column 
accomplish such a purpose as that. 
It certainly is a task to behold and 
wonder at — that of editing this 
column of any college publication. 
Someone suggest a plan! ! 



THE new rules passed by the Stu- 
dent Self Government Associa- 
tion last week are, on the 
whole, very liberal. They are based 
entirely on seniority of class. This 
is as it should be and raises Lois 
Hall from a dormitory with boarding- 
school rules to a position very similar 
to dormitories in most large Univer- 
sities. The upper class privileges 
are very liberal. Ten o'clock permis- 
sion and callers every evening are 
more than even the most radical 
dared to hope a year or two ago. A 
few complaints have been heard 
from the underclassmen. But even 
they have many more privileges than 
the upperclassmen had when they 
were Freshmen and Sophomores. 
With a Dean as liberal as Miss Hamil- 
ton the matter of special permissions 
is one not to be dreaded by any 
Freshman. 

The one thing that is necessary to 
make these new rules a success is 
the hearty support and active co- 
operation of every girl in Lois Hall. 
These rules are not imposed by any 
arbitrary authority but are the effort 
of a respresentative group of girls 
acting with the Dean of Women. 
Ample opportunity for criticism and 
discussion was given before the rules 
were passed. Now that they have 
been voted upon the time for criti- 
cism and opposition has passed. It 
is up to every girl in the Hall to show 
what she is made of by observing 
the spirit as well as the letter of these 
rules. 



IT has been estimated that more 
than twelve hundred languages 
were spoken in the two Americas. 
These languages give evidence of no 
continuously progressive type of cul- 
ture. The many tribes have changed 
their vocabulary; but the identical 
method of putting words together 
has survived without change. One 
striking characteristic is the fre 
quency of long words. This is well 
illustrated by the Aztec word for let- 
ter-postage i — "amatlocuilolitquitcat- 
laxlahuilli" — the literal meaning of 
which is "the payment received for 
carrying a paper on which something 
is written". By comparison, and 
classification of the countless dialects 
and languages, they are reduced to 
a few groups: the Tumeh group cov- 
ers the northern part of the Rocky 
Mountains; the Aztec group has its 
seat in Central Mexico and Central 
America; the Maya group has its seat 
in Central America, and Yucatan; 
the Appalachian tribes include all 
those with which the English and 



Jen and Mary 

Miss Hamilton explaining the new 
hotel rules — "A chaperon is a re- 
sponsible senior or a teacher. Of 
course an irresponsible senior would 
not be a chaperon but next year we 
are not going to have any irrespon- 
sible seniors. 



Listen to what the birdie told 
us. 

Last Saturday Brothers Marsh, 
Thayer, Hoover, Davis and Moore 
journeyed into the big city and at- 
tended a party where the nice young 
ladies (?) showered them with dais- 
ies. If pansies are for thot and 
roses for love — what were the dais- 
ies for? 



Ruth Kenyon displaying her new 
goggles, "Yes, Miss Hamilton said 
yesterday that I seemed so in- 
tellectual." 

L. Sprecher, "What were you do- 
ing?" 

Kenyon, "Oh I was not saying any- 
thing." 



Judging from the new rules all 
the Sophomores need is green caps. 

Certainly it's all right now — 
there's honor for the seniors — late 
permish for juniors — tender care 
for budding frosh — and confine- 
ment for the sophs. 



Excerpts from frosh pome: 
"The maiden o'er the flower bent 
And from its place the violet went.' 



Anne Merner in house meeting, 
"Madam President, 
When is dusk?" 



the French first came in contact from 
the Atlantic to the basin of the Miss- 
issippi, and also the tribes of the 
northern part of South America; the 
Amazonian tribes occupy a large part 
of South America. 

From all this, the language situa- 
tion in the New World, so to speak, 
would appear to be quite hopeless; 
but it is by no means such. As a 
matter of fact, the English, French, 
and Spanish languages prevail in 
ninety per-cent of the Americas 
and these various tribal tongues are 
gradually dying out or else the tribes 
are adopting the modern tongues with 
which they come in contact. Re- 
( Continued on page 185) 



THE STENTOR 



185 



We'd Suggest Another Week 
of Real Hazing 

If this Article is the Result of "Motherly Ad- 
vice" Perhaps the Motherly Slipper 
Would be Better Understood! 



Last Monday evening a special 
house meeting was called when new 
rules and regulations were adopted, 
which the inmates of Lois Hall must 
henceforth obey. The writer has no- 
thing to say about them — having 
been told she must co-operate. She 
would like to suggest, though, that 
the faculty drum up a few more re- 
liable Seniors for next year, to 
chaperon the Freshmen and Sopho- 
mores, since the children must be in 
when the lights are lighted. 

After the rules were adopted the 
Senior girls gave the underclassmen 
just a bit of consolatry and motherly 
advice about our conduct in chapel, 
at the dining table and in class 
rooms. We hate to tell you but we 
did need much of the chiding we got. 
We were told that 'tis a bit childish 
to crowd into the upperclassmen's 



pews in chapel; but as long as we 
are treated as children it is only na- 
tural that we should act as chil- 
dren. 

Our Freshman class was reproved 
for having broken down certain Lois 
Hall traditions; among which was the 
one of bringing the laundry to the 
upperclassmen. I voice the senti- 
ment of entire Freshman class in 
saying that we heartily regret this, 
but it is really the upperclassmen's 
own tea party that this custom was 
broken. Since none of the Frosh 
came from wash-women mothers they 
did not respond instinctively to deliver- 
ing laundry. However had they been 
told that it was customary to do it 
in college they certainly would have 
responded as readily as they have to 
other traditions. 



_ ! _. 



ege 

Attend High School 
Prom. 

About fifteen couples from the Col- 
lege attended the Junior. Prom at 
Deerfield-Shield's High School last 
Friday night. It was a very lovely 
party — the music was goo,^ and the 
Japanese decorations were very 
pretty. Seeing the small Highland 
Park School youngsters dancing 
around brought back pleasant mem- 
ories of our old High School days. 



(Continued from page 184) 

gardless of whether it be Yiddish or 
plain Anglo-Saxon. 

Hence, one planning to tour the 
western hemisphere upon leaving 
Lake Forest, need have no fear as 
long as Professor Van Steenderen 
and his department of Romance 
Languages remains with us. This 
department of our curriculum is often 
neglected and sneered at by our stu- 
dents — but after all it is the key 
to a progressive type of culture after 
which we are all striving. 




The Original 

"Mable Sykes" 



DIAMOND MEDAL -:- ARTIST -:- PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 



.. ■■• '. '.-■- - ,■..■; 
■•-•■ • '.'■■ !.s;3 
:■• : rifiijliq; 



140 North State Street 

)pposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts 

Established at present location since 1906 

:r of hy-class portra 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 
Phone Central 5341 



• " • - - .■-■.■■;.:-•;■ .; ■.;■ 

(Opposite Fields— cor. State and Randolph Sts.) '<'"■ "'"■' "lointqo 

. ,o bus 

MAKER OF HY-CLASS PORTRAITS 

■ '.-.- hs ■-'■ 

: "•• ' "' ,l.u 

. - itp?.q«3 ysoe 

• ■ - -■ «;£iT9p !i 

.".... :~ -::- — :.■: '.BbiiO'fl 

.. . .' . . saslit : .- , la isauiioa 




186 



THE STENTOK 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Sq u are 




Studio Open Sundays 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 




The daily use oi 

KOSMEO CREAM 

and 

KOSMEO POWDER 

and a weeklu visit to 

Mrs. Graham s 
BeauHj Shop 

1432 Stevens B% 

will create a perfect 

complexion. 

TRY IT. 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsky 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {F}uilding 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision ^Dealers 



Grocery Market 

807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 

Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



USE BOWMAN'S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milK bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-1C9 Vine Ave- 



Service List 

HERBERT E. HOUSE, '94 

1894. Herbert E. House, 4 7 12 
Gramercy Place, Los Angeles, Calif., 
was a field secretary for the Canton 
Christian College up to the time the 
United States entered the war. At 
that time he entered the Y. M. C. A. 
work at San Diego and acted as a sec- 
retary until August 1918. 



CLARENCE COOLTDGE, '9fl 

1896. Clarence A. Coolidge, of 
Chicago, went overseas as a Y.M.C.A. 
Divisional Secretary in January 
1918. He is in France at present in 
this service and his address is 
Y. M. C. A. Secretary, 12 Rue d' 
Aguesseau, Paris, France. 



LIEUT. E. C. COOK, '11 

1911. Lieut. Edgar Charles Cook, 
of Mendota, 111., enlisted in the army 
in August 1917. He was trained at 
Fort Riley, Kansas in the M. R. C. 
remaining there until May 1918 when 
he went to Camp Dix, N. J., and 
thence to France as surgeon in the 
Evacuation Hospital No. 10 at 
Froidos in the Argonne. He is still 
in service with the rank of 1st Lieu- 
tenant. 



WILLIS R. DUNSMORE, '13 

1913. Willis Rowland Dunsmore, 
No. 134, Coronado Rd., Phoenix, 
Ariz., was unable to enter the army 
or naval service on account of de- 
fective hearing. He enlisted in war 
work with the Y. M. C. A. and served 
three months with the army in 
Gettysburg, Pa., and ten months with 
the Navy at Cape May, N. J. He is 
living in the "hotter than summer" 
climate of Arizona, working for the 
Southern Cotton Co., and expecting 
to stay on for some years in the hope 
of curing an incipient deafness. His 
address is 134 E. Coronado Road, 
Phoenix. 



VERNA ANDERSON, '16 

1916. Verna Anderson, 101 Catalpa 
St. Joliet, 111., served as a clerk in 
the Ordnance Department, (Progress 
Section), Washington, D. C, from 
June 19, 1918 to December 23, 1918. 



EUGENE B. DURR, '17 

1917. Eugene Blakely Durr, of Tay- 
lorville, 111., enlisted as a coxwain in 
the navy about the first of May 1917. 
He landed in France in June of the 
same year and for nineteen months 



THE STENTOR 



187 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

I EXPRESSMAN i 

<|> Special Attention Given to Students <|> 



TELEPHONE I 
NUMBERS i 



Residence 675 
Office 384 



<S><^^$k$>«^x»<^><S>^><J>^><3xS>^x^m>^^^ 



Q 



The V*/imlity Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Dr. G. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

12:10 m. 5:0u p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllUlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUUIIUIIIII 

(^JLASS Pins and Rings. 

^■^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 

SPIES BROS 

mini 



27 E. MONROE ST. 

CHICAGO 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



did convoy and patrol service in the 
North and Irish Seas, and off the 
coast of France. He received a com- 
mission in May 19 IS after having 
taken the Annapolis examinations. 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 



For Light 
For Heat 
For Power 

North Shore Gas Co. 



Gas 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusive 
Dry Goods Store 




LIEUT. DONALD MC LEOD, '18 

1918. Donald C. McLeod, 2637 
Girard Ave., So. Minneapolis, Minn., 
enlisted at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 
May 1, 1917. He spent three months 
at Fort Sheridan, 111., as orderly in 
Post Hospital, one year at Base Hos- 
pital, Camp MacArthur, Texas, as 
drill sergeant, 1st sergeant and Hos- 
pital Sergeant. On August 19, 1918, 
he was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant 
Sanitary Corps, was sent to Base 
Hospital, Camp Sheridan, Alabama, 
where he served as registrar, Post 
Exchange Officer, Quartermaster Of- 
ficer, and Medical Supply Officer. He 
was still in the service April 10, 1919. 



L. H. W. SPE1DEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



LIEUT. ROBT. HUGHES, '19 

1919. Rob.ert William Hughes, 
1201 Jones St., Omaha, Nebr., enter- 
ed the aviation at Seattle, Washing- 
ton, Nov. 23, 1917. From that date 
until January 13, 1919 when he was 
discharged at Taliaferro Field, 
Hicks, Texas, as a 2nd Lieutenant 
A.S.A. R.M.A. U.S.A., he was trans- 
ferred, apparently to every training 
field in the country. He is now rat- 
ed as a reserve military aviator and 
his present occupation is that of a 
jobbing grocer in Omaha. 



LIEUT. HENRY MC MASTER, '20 

1920. Lieutenant Henry Thomas 
McMaster, Elgin, 111., enlisted in the 
aviation on February 7, 1918 and re- 
ceived training at Camp Dick, Dal- 
las, Texas, University of Austin, Aus- 
tin, Texas, and later at Selfridge 
Field, Mt. Clemens, Mich. He was 
ready to leave for Mineola at the 
time the armistice was signed, and 
received his discharge on December 
13, 1919. 



Dry Goods 



^yfShopfor 
^WomenstiXhildrens Furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



Eleanor Goble entertained Anne 
Sillar and Hazel Seguin at her home 
in Elgin, over the week-end. 



Zelma Farwell visited Mr. and Mrs. 
O. Helfrich in Chicago over the 
week-end. 



Established 1871 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 

73-75 W. South Water Street 
Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TR1EBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 1 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Why? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



lZrT"RT7T CI^V Successor to 

iVU-DiiJLoKl Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 

For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



188 



THE STENTOR 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C, the college work for the rest of the 
year has been reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — continues 
for this year; consequently the third term opened on Tuesday, April 1. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good "opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1858. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, HI. 



i!lilililliilll!!!l!ilil!lill!ll!!!l!III!il!iilll 



JENSEN &SUNDM ARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 



C. G. Wenban & Son 
Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 
A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 

Cleaning and Pressing . . $1.50 

Pressing ... . . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



'AMES MITCHELL 
The | EWELER 

Military Walches and 
College Jewelry 



The Market Square Restau- 
rant and Tea Room 

Open 7:00 a. m. to 8:00 p. m. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ana 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



J. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, ill. 



M. H. Hussey & Go. 

Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



T 



HE STENTOR 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



VOLUME XXXIV. 



LAKE! FOREST, ILLINOIS, MAY 9, 1919. 



NUMBER 25 



Omega Psi Gives 
Successful Dance 



If Omega Psi Fraternity reaps the 
reward of all its careful planning, 
labour and worry, for Saturday night 
in the enjoyment of the guests it 
should certainly feel most amply rei- 
paid. 

The Institute was decorated for 
the occasion in the fraternity colors^, 
green, gold, and black. Many palms 
also added to the unwanted attrac- 
tiveness of the building. The receiv'r 
ing line consisted of Miss Hamilton, 
Professor Van Steenderen and Mel- 
Neil, Professor and Mrs. Howard], 
Miss Wells, Virginia Wales, and 
Morris Mndge. The grand march was 
led by Beatrice Worthley and Merle 
McEvoy. 

The selection of the music siiowejl 
the taste of a connoisseur. It was the 
last word in "up-to-the minute-ness.V 
Cunning programs decorated with thjj 
Omega Psi emblem were a feature oif 
the evening. Delicious frozen punch 
added to the enjoyment of a moist 
successful party. 

Omega Psi is certainly to be con- 
gratulated for carrying through an 
entirely finished and lovely function 
when all the powers and elements 
seemed to be trying their best tp 
spoil things. 



Lake Forest Welcomes 
Interscholastics ! 

Expression Contests Today 

Games Tomorrow 



Garrick to Present Farce 
Tonight 

There, are just enough shudders 
and shrieks in the farce to be given 
tonight by the Garrick Club to make 
it — well — to make it what it is. 

"Peggy, the guns", hisses the com- 
mander of the situation and four 
helpless females cower, and shiver, 
and shriek, and shudder, blanched 
with fear. 

"Listen!" screams one, and they 
all listened. What they heard you'll 
hear tonight in "She Burglar" 
by Margaret Cameron. It is a clever 
one act farce to be presented during 
the fateful intermission when the 
judges decide. 



The Interscholastic Contests in 
Expression are to be held today at 
the Durand Institute, the prelimi- 
naries in the afternoon and the finals 
in the evening beginning at S P. M. 
So far 22 schools have entered as 
against 19 last year, the limit as to 
number being 24. These schools are 
as follows: 

SCHOOLS REPRESENTED 

From Illinois, Deerfield-Shields, 
New Trier, La Grange, Proviso Town- 
ship, Maywood, Elgin, Bloomington, 
Joliet, Freeport, Riverside, Oak 
Park, and from Chicago, McKinley, 
Hyde Park, Lake View, and Nicholas 
Senn. From Indiana, Valparaiso. 
South Bend, Mishawaka and Culver 
Academy. From Wisconsin, Racine, 
Kenosha and Washington High School 
in Milwaukee. The only new school 
in this list is the Riversic.e-Brook- 
fleld. All the others have sent teams 
one or more times in previous years 
and some of them every year since 
the contests were instituted in 1911. 
A good many cordial expressions of 



tance of clear and accurate statement 
of facts as the first requisite, with 
of course logical arrangement and 
mannerly and forceful bearing and 
utterance as secondary. In other 
words, we do not wish to burden the 
special teachers in the high schools 
with training students for these con- 
tests, but to secure sort of super- 
recitations on topics bearing on the 
ordinary studies of their daily routine. 

PROGRAM FOR FRIDAY 

The program for Friday is inform- 
ally as follows: a committee of the 
men is appointed to meet the visi- 
tors at the station to conduct them 
to the Durand Institute and in gen- 
eral to look after their welfare and 
guidance during the day. A com- 
mittee of the women will act as hosts 
for the girls at Lois Durasd -Hall. 
Afternoon recitations are suspended. 
Usually the visitors begin to come 
on the mid-morning trains and most 
of them are here for luncheon at the 
Durand Commons at 12:30. All the 
meals for the visitors are to be pro- 



continuing interest in the contests v ided at the Commons. 

The preliminaries in the Oral Dis- 
cussion will begin at the Durand In- 



have come along with the entries. 
LOOK OUT FOR "CANNED GOODS 



The idea at Lake Forest has been 
to get away from elocution and from 
"canned" speeches and to found these 
competitions very strictly upon the 
ordinary work done in the high 
schools. In spite of every care taken 
in the preparation of the lists of ques- 
tions, occasionally somebody gets 
away with a successful speech on a 
subject on which he had no previous 
knowledge, as when, for example, a 
young man from Milwaukee two or 
three years ago chose for his topic 
"The Efficient Kitchen." But we de- 
sire to impress upon the competitors, 
upon the high schools which send 
them, and upon the judges the impor- 



siitute and in the Chapel at 2 P. M., 
the drawing for places and the as- 
signments of topics having been first 
made an hour earlier. The prelimi- 
nary contests in reading will take 
place in Professor Raymond's reci- 
tation room beginning soon after 2 
P. M. Student visitors are welcome 
at both these competitions being only 
asked to give them the same con- 
sideration as to interruptions as 
they would a musical program. The 
contest in letterwriting for which no 
final is necessary will be conducted 
as in previous years in Professor 
Allee's laboratory under the charge 
of special judges. 

(Continued on next page) 



190 



THE STENTOR 



Athletic Contests Tomorrow 

Interscholastic Track Meet 
on Farwell Field 



The fifteenth interscholastic games 
will be held at Farwell Field this 
year on the afternoon of May 10th, 
wind and weather permitting. A 
good entry list is expected, although 
track athletics have not been re- 
sumed in many of the high schools 
this spring, a condition largely due 
to the unsettled situation resulting 
from the end of the war. 

Mr. Herman Olcott, the Fosdick 
Commission man in charge of athle- 
tics at the Great Lakes has been se- 
cured for 'referee and starter. Mr. 
Olcott is a man of wide athletic ex- 
perience having played on different 
Vale athletic teams, coached and 
directed athletics at several different 
institutions one being that of An- 
napolis, so it is expected that the 
events will be run off promptly and 
smoothly. Carl Hellberg also of the 
Great Lakes, and a former Lake 
Forest College track man will be 
clerk of the course. The other of- 
ficials such as timers, judges of fin- 
ish, inspectors and so forth will be 
drafted from the student body and 
faculty. The meet will afford a 
great opportunity to demonstrate how 
much cooperation and college spirit 



exists on the compus, and the success 
of the day will largely depend upon 
a demonstration of that spirit, not 
only in aiding in carrying on the 
meet, but in the entertaining of the 
visitors for the day. It is up to ev- 
ery individual to make the members 
of the visiting teams to feel perfectly 
at home, so that when they leave 
they will feel kindly toward Lake 
Forest College and its people. 

The events will start promptly 
at 1:30 and the schedule set down 
in the printed programme will be 
followed as closely as possible, each 
event being announced by the an- 
nouncer Chester Davis who will be 
located on a platform at the west 
end of the field. Lucius Legner 
manager of the meet will appreciate 
any aid that he calls for from mem- 
bers of the student body, and the 
proper college spirit will not make 
him call twice upon any individual. 
Here's our chance to show that we 
are a real live institution. Let's em- 
brace it for all we're worth and make 
this one of the best interscholastics 
that has even been run off in the 
history of the institution. 



INTERSCHOLASTIC PROGRAM 

(Continued from first page). 



In the later afternoon interval 
after the preliminaries are over, vis- 
itors may occupy the time in strolling 
about the campus or the town, or in 
attending the ball game with North- 
western College at Farwell Field. 

COMMONS DINNER TONIGHT 

A common dinner for the whole 
college family and the visitors will 
be given at the Durand Institute at 
6 o'clock, at which time the an- 
nouncement of the results of the pre- 
liminaries will be read. 

FINALS AFTER DINNER 

At the final contests in the evening 
the first part of the program will be 
given up to the five winners of the 
preliminaries of the reading contest 
in the afternoon. Each of these con- 
testants will be given a short bit of 
prose or poetry taking about 5 min- 
utes of time for reading. Following 
this will be the contest of the five 
teams of two each who have won the 



preliminary competition in the after- 
noon. In the interval between the 
conclusion of the oral discussion con- 
test and the announcement of the 
prizes, the Garrick Club will give a 
short one-act play. 

Arrangements have been made for 
entertaining over night those of the 
visitors who cannot conveniently get 
away or who wish to stay over for 
the games on Saturday afternoon. 



Leon MacFerran was a visitor at 
Phi Pi over the week end. 



Herbert Petersen and Edwin John- 
son visited Phi Pi over the week end. 



"Bud" Pearce visited Kappa Sigma 
on Sunday. 



Jen and Mary 

Rhapsody of Spring 

Spring again, 
Sheets of rain, 
What a flood — 
Ugh, that's mud! 

Spring is here 
That's why we're 
In the dumps 
Having mumps. 

First of May 
Bills to pay 
Dreadful lack 
of loose jack. 

Oh, the spring, 
Nawsty thing, 
Cold and wet. 
But don't fret 

What is worse, 
All this verse 
Rates the hearse 
Cause the bloomin' 
came out. 



Contributions From the English De- 
partment: 

Sib — Yes that same Robert Pelton 
Sibley that judged your contest chil- 
dren, — used low-brow in a lecture. 
One senior, M. Horton put it in her 
note book — "low-brough." 

Moral: Always warn your class be- 
fore you use slang. 



Mr. Sibley and Dr. Dorn made a 
scientific investigation after the re- 
cent flood in College Hall. Judging 
from the quantity of water absorbed 
they concluded that Matthew Arnold 
was really the driest author. 



Music School Notes 

Miss Beatrice Brown from the 
Columbia College of Expression spent 
the week-end the guest of Vesta 
Votau and attended the Omega Psi 
Dance. 



Miss Lottchen Knaak spent the 
week-end with frier.is at Crystal 
Lake, Illinois. 



"Common' 
Hash!! 
Peaches ! ! 
Apricots! ! 
Pears!! 
Stew!! 



News 



'Nuff sed! 



THE S T E N T O R 



191 



Mass Athletics 

After receiving the eligibility re- 
port from the last faculty meeting; 
the coach and several leading lights 
of the campus, in due session assem- 
bled, decided that some new form of 
athletic endeavor should be promul- 
gated among the students. After 
the question had been thrown open 
to discussion among the several con- 
stituent members, it was finally sug- 
gested that some form of physical 
activity which did not require any 
special mental preparation or natural 
endowment would be suitable; there- 
fore the following rules governing 
eligibility and membership in "The 
S. A. T. C. Plus Society" were drawn 
up and duly ratified. 

First, all male members of the cam- 
pus are eligible to membership — 
provided: 

A — That they have been shaved 
within the last three days, as in the 
past protests have come from con- 
testants remarking that the lack of 
this precaution has resulted deleter- 
iously to the complexion of the op- 
ponent. 

B — It is also resired that no con- 
testants will have partaken of or as- 
sociated with, in the five hours pre- 
ceding the contest, the mellifulous 
onion or fragrant garlic. 

C — The hair tonic must be of pre- 
scribed variety as it is certain that 
in the past, contestants have become 
addicted to the use of intoxicating 
liquors through inhalations of spirit- 
ous concoctions used by one. or both 
contestants. 

D — There shall be no hitting in 
the clinches, and all contests shall 
be held in broad day light before a 
properly constituted representative 
body. 

E — It is also desired that a speci- 
fied amount of face powder shall be 
used, thus preventing any regret- 
able accidents, occurring on the turns 
during windy weather, caused by the 
blinding cloud of same. 

Respectfully submitted for the ap- 
proval of the student body as a 
whole. 



Music School Chorus 
To Give Operetta 

The Lake Forest University School 
of Music Chorus will give an operetta, 
Saturday evening, May J " , at the 
Durand Art Institute, at 8:15 o clock 
It is an operetta in two acts, entitled, 
"In India", by Paul Bliss. Every one 
remembers the simplicity and deli- 
cacy of the operetta, "The Feast of 
the Little Lanterns," staged here larst 
year by Mr. and Mrs. Phillips: and af- 
ter having seen a small part of Mr. 
Bliss' ability as a composer of oper- 
ettas for women's voices the interest 
this year should be of a greater de- 
gree than ever. 

The scene of the operetta is in the 
Indian village of Fisheri on the banks 
of the Ganges, and it is the Feast 
day of the flowers, which is being cele- 
brated by a chorus of Indian maidens. 

The principal roles are taken by 
Sara Moore, Eulah Winter, Hazel 
Fellers, Ruth Kenyon, Lillian Steph- 
ens, Margaret Best, and Marion Cook. 
There will be a small orchestra with 
Gomer Bath at the piano. The oper- 
etta is being staged by Mrs. Phillips 
and Miss Helen Buzzell of Ferry Hall; 
Mr. Phillips is directing the musical 
side of the operetta. 

Everyone remembers the success of 
the operetta given by Mr. and Mrs. 
Philipps last year, and are looking 
forward to the production to be given 
in a few weeks. At the close of the 
operetta there will be a jitney dance 
with good music. So come out and 
make this a success. 



CALENDAR 



May !) — Discussion Contest. 
Garrick Club Play. 
I May 10 — Athletic Contest. 
;May 17 — Operetta given by Glee Club. 
J May 23 — Lois Hall Formal. 

May 2 4- -Subscription Concert. 

June 7 — Senior Dance. 



Garnett McVicar visited Omega 
Psi over Saturday and Sunday. 



Ruth Stommel entertained Agnes 
Hoffman, Ruth Bahlert, and Lydia 
Sprecher at her home in Dyer, Indiana 
over the week end. 



THE 

CLARK 

TEACHERS' 



30TH YEAH. 



VACANCIES for SEPTEMBER at SALARIES 

larRcr tliiin ever before offered 

ONE REGISTRATION PERMANENT 

FOR ALL, OFFICE'S 

CHATTANOOGA. 
CHICAGO NEW YORK BALTIMORE. MD. TENN. 

54 E. Van Buren St. Flatiron Bldg. Munsey Bldg. Temple Court Bldg. 
KANSAS CITY. MO. ST. PAUL, MINN. SPOKANE, WASH. 

N. Y. Life Bldg. Exchange Bank Eldg. Chamber of Commerce Bldg. 



Engagement Announced 

An item of great interest to the 
Campus was the announcement of 
the engagement of Jessie E. Carr '17 
to Lorrain G. Smith '17. The mar- 
riage will take place next winter 
and they will reside in Miami Florida. 



Lady will sell Iarsje 50 in. $250 

size mahogany grand opera phono- 
graph and 2U0 steel needles and re- 
cords. Used few weeks. Will take 
*74 lor outfit and ship C. O. D. on 
approval. Act quick. 
Mrs. Waverly-Brown, 317 Greeuleaf 

Ave., Wilmette, 111 , near Linden 

Sta. Mil. Electric. 



Sport Cloths, Cricket and 

Tennis 

Flannels in Abundance 




CLOTH .SATISFACTION IS 
THE FIRST STEP IN 
CLOTHES SATISFAC- 
TION. 

There is practically no end 

to the variety of fabrics 

here — ready to choose 
from — 

Fabrics having distinction 
and individuality — 

Fabrics of the latest weaves 
and of the finest textures. 

DEPENDABLE FABRICS" 

You'll appreciate our rich 

assortment. 

Prices $40, $45, $50 
and upwards 

Jerrems Tailoring appeals to 
men who never overdo — 
especially in clothes. 

Tailor for Young Men 

Three Stores: 

7 North La Salle St. 

314 S Michigan Av e. 

7 1 E. Monroe St. 



192 



THE ST EN TOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 
Lillian Evans, '19. 
Harriet Harris, '19. 
Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 
Lydia Spreclier, '19. 
liuth Stommel, '19. 
Eleanor Goble, '21. 

Business Managers: 
Agnes Hoffman, '19. 
Margaret Horton, '19. 

Reporters: 

Sara Moore, '21. 
Paul Offenlieiser, '21. 
Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 
Horace Horton, '20. 
Howard Wood, '22. 
Raymond Moore, '21. 

Professor W. R. Bridgeman 

Faculty and Alumni. 



Subscription Rates: 



One Year . 
Ten Issues 



.$2.00 
. .75 



Entered at the postoffiee of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, ns second-class matter. 



MOTHER'S Day has a special 
significance for all of us this 
year. For the past few years 
it has been rather a day of sorrow 
and anxiety for mothers and for sons 
who were far apart, but this year it 
will be a wonderful day of joy and 
hope for many. Let us not forget 
those mothers, however, whose sons 
have not come and can never come 
home. To thoughts and honor of 
them and their heroic sons, let this 
day be given. 

To most of us here at college, next 
Sunday may not have the significance 
which it has to so many others, but 
let us think of the day and all it 
stands for until it does have a deeper 
meaning to us. "Write a letter home" 
is the slogan for Mother's Day, and 
let us make it just the kind of letter 
we know mother likes to get, and 
when that is done think of some 
mother who perhaps will not get a 
letter this year as she did last, and 
write one to her. May Mother's Day 
have a deeper meaning to all of us, 
so that w-e may live up to the ideals 
she has set before us, not only for the 
one day, but for all the year. 



WE are all looking forward 
with a great deal of interest 
to the Interscholastic contest 
which is scheduled for this week end. 
We who are Frosh have never seen 
one before but we have heard so 
much about them we can hardly wait 
for the week end. The others have 
seen them and are looking forward to 
this one with pleasure. 

This is one phase of college activit- 
ies that has been a decided success. 
It is a splendid advertisement for any 
school, as other colleges besides Lake 
Forest have discovered, and so it has 
become an annual occurrence. 

It helps prospective students to be- 
come interested in us and to get a 
taste of what real college life is — so 
let all of us try to do what we can to 
make a happy and worth while week 
end for those who come so they will 
go back to their schools with only 
praise for Lake Forest. The location 
and campus is beautiful and all that 
we could ask for so it really is up to 
us now. Remember, that it wasn't so 
very long ago that we were in 
High School. 

Now all together — Let's hope for 
good weather and a happy week end 
for the "strangers within our gates." 



Is That So? 

Davis — Say Mil! what brought you 

to Lake Forest College. 
Mil. — Oh! I guess it was the S.A.T.C. 



1st. Student — There goes two Omega 
Psis. 

2nd. Student — Hanson is an Omega 
Psi, but Tracy isn't. 

1st. Student — Tracy has been ex- 
posed to the Omega Psis any way. 



Heard at the Market Square Inn. 

Jim — Swell dance we had last night, 
wasn't it . 

Joe — Yes it was — I sure do hate to 
eat in this place — takes so long to 
get waited on. 

Jim — Did you notice the skirt that 
Pete had with him last night. She 
looked as though some one had hit 
her in the face with a brick. I 
think he could have done that well 
at Lois Hall. Where did he get 
that dame any way? 

Joe — Imported her from Chicago — 
yes I'll take coffee with my order. 

Jim — Say! did you see her teeth — 
she sure is a poor ad for a denti- 
fice; is she? 

Jim — Oh! I have seen better teeth. 
I don't think we should talk that 
way about her; her father has lots 
of money. 



Joe — Well she needs money with a 

face like that. 
Jim — Did you notice the bunch of 

weeds that he gave her? 
Joe — Yes! and it sure was a wise 

move too; it sort of neutralized 

the effects of her face. 
Jim — I wish that waiter would hurry, 

I've a date at the hall in an hour. 
Joe — Why didn't you bring your 

woman to dinner with you? 
Jim — There are very few fellows 

come here on Sunday and it sort 

of spoils the whole day if the bunch 

don't see me out with her. 
Joe — Gee that waiter is slow, we 

been waiting a half an hour. 
Jim — Yes, he is about as bad as 

Dourghty at the commons. 
Joe — I hope some good looking dames 

come to the interscholastic next 

Friday. 
Jim — So do I. If I see one I could 

fall for I'll try and get her to 

come next year and if she will 

come, I'll date her up for a year 

ahead. 
Joe — Say look at this woman com- 
ing in the door now! 
Jim — She has enough paint on her 

to give you the painters cholic. 
Joe — Well here is your waiter. 
Jim — Waiter, you don't look a day 

older. 

The two young hopefuls are seen 
busily engaged drinking their soup 
in the key of G. 



Miss Rumsey Speaks at 
Y. W. C. A. Meeting 

Last Thursday evening the girls 
of Lois Hall had the delightful op- 
portunity of hearing Miss Rumsey 
speak. Miss Rumsey is a most ardent 
worker in Mission Study, and every 
word of her speech was interesting to 
•every girl. Miss Rumsey spoke of the 
great opportunity for service in 
Foreign Countries, and of the three 
factors in our lines that could be con- 
tributed. They were service, money 
and prayer, and while none of us 
could perhaps give all three, we 
could give one at least. 

This was one of the most interest- 
ing meetings of the year, and ev-ery 
girl will look forward to the pleasure 
of seeing and hearing Miss Rumsey 
again. 



Sherwood Baker, R. S. Cutler, 
James Coyle, D. T. Howard and A. T. 
Hanson were guests of Omega Psi 
over the week end. 



Why did Framberg go to the mani- 
curist? To get his hand held? 



THE STENTOR 



193 



Our Guests 

We have as our guests this week- 
end, more than two hundred and 
fifty young men and women, repre- 
senting over twenty-five different 
high schools and academies in the so- 
called Lake Forest territory. Why 
have they come? 

The primary reason for their com- 
ing to Lake Forest is the annual in- 
terscholastic meet held by this in- 
stitution each year, and to which 
every student eligible is anxious to 
come. We have with us, then, the 
Demosthenesian orators and Hercu- 
lean giants, the choice from the very 
best that the various institutions 
which they represent can produce. 
So we feel honored in welcoming such 
a fine class of people to our commu- 
nity to enjoy a pleasant week-end 
with us. Already they have shown 
their power as orators and some of 
the orations would even show up our 
own feeble attempts at the same art. 
On the morrow however comes the 
Olympic games — the final decisions 
— awarding of prizes — shouting — 
and all will be over for another 
year. 

Lake Forest has no athletic bowl 
such as they have at Yale and other 
eastern Universities, nor do we have 
the world famed stadium such as was 
prevalent in the days of the old 
Greeks, but that is not the real ques- 



tion — we have some of the finest 
athletes possible with us who are to 
compete in the track meet tomorrow 
and there is no reason to believe that 
the Lake Forest Interscholastics will 
not uphold its past records and set 
new paces for the various events that 
will open the eyes of the University 
World. 

The secondary reason, but by all 
means the most important reason for 
the Interscholastics is the interest 
that may be aroused in the visitors 
for Lake Forest University. We 
have the ideal college in the ideal 
place and under ideal supervision. 
We have more to show and offer the 
prospective student, than any other 
institution of learning in the mid- 
dle west. This is an era of educa- 
tion — an era when men and women 
must look beyond their own little 
community into a larger world of 
which Lake Forest is a part. It is 
here and only here that one is able 
to get in a practical way that pro- 
gressive type of culture which is so 
necessary for ultimate success. 

So in extending a welcome to our 
visitors we wish to beg of them to 
stay just as long as they can, see as 
much of Lake Forest and the life 
here as possible — and when they 
get ready to pick a higher institution 
of learning, not to forget the spirit 
of good fellowship which prevails at 
Lake Forest College. 



Dr. Boyle Visits 
Lake Forest 

Dr. W. H. W. Boyle, formerly pas- 
tor of the First Presbyterian Church 
of Lake Forest, and for a number 
of years one of the Trustees of Lake 
Forest University, spent a short time 
here last week. Since leaving Lake 
Forest Dr. Boyle has been in charge 
of a Denver Church. He is now on 
his way to Europe as a member of 
the commission entrusted with the 
expenditure of several million dol- 
lars for the restoration of protestant 
chapels and churches in the war de- 
vasted regions of Europe. Dr. Boyle 
carries with him the best wishes of 
the entire college community. 



"Hack" Reese has started a cam- 
paign to have his name changed to 
D. Milo Reese. It sounds much bet- 
ter is Hacks reason. 



Legner, according to Prof. Kurzin, 
has that "jelly fish" feeling in class — 
the well known feeling in an 8 
o'clock. 



Mason Armstrong awaketh out of 
a sound sleep and insists that twice 
one is three. He got 87 at that for a 
mark. 




The Original 

"Mable Sykes" 

DIAMOND MEDAL -:- ARTIST -:- PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 




140 North State Street 

(Opposite Fields — cor, State and Randolph Sts. ) 

Established at present location since 1906 

MAKER OF HY-CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 

Phone Central 5341 



194 



THE S T E N T O R 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 




Studio Open Sunday 

with Elevator Service 



PHOTOGRAPHER 

Phone Central 2719 

GARRICK BUILDING, 

64 W. Randolph St., CHICAGO 



SPECIAL RATES TO COLLEGES AND FRATERNITIES 




The daily use of 

KOSMEO CREAM 

and 

KOSMEO POWDER 

ana a weekly visit to 

Mrs. Graham's 
Beauty Shop 

1432 Stevens Bldg. 

will create a perfect 

complexion. 

TRY IT. 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



/. B. Veselsky 

Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Irwin Brothers 



'Provision Dealers 



Grocery 



Market 



807-9 So. State St. CHICAGO 
Tel. Harrison 515, 516,517 



USE BOWMAN'S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milK bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 

BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-109 Vine Ave. 



We Didn't Wait For 
July 1st 

Liake Forest experienced the sensa- 
tions of a desert last week-end. But 
at that the desert had it on us because 
even though water and electricity are 
minus quantities in a desert, the in- 
habitants don't have formal dances 
and therefore the necessity for mar- 
celled hair, clean faces, and com- 
plexions put on straight is not great. 

Any feminine soul will realize the 
feeling of consternation that swept 
over Lois Hall when the lights went 
out. Not that the inmates of the 
hall object to dim lights — sometimes. 
But there is a time and a place for 
all things — and the time is not before 
a formal dance. The straight haired 
maidens hied themselves to the base- 
ment and there heated their irons 
over the gas stove. But the worst 
was still in store. By the time the 
girls were ready for the finishing 
touches darkness had settled over the 
world. Luckily the ladies dressing 
room at the Institute was lighted by 
gas or many a suitor would have 
asked his partner "Prithee why so 
pale?" 

Sunday the town went waterless — 
just to show us how foolish we were 
to crab about the lights. The con- 
gregation at church was considerably 
depleted on this account. After 
Hooverizing for a time the water 
spent a pleasant afternoon putting on 
a little "now you see me, now you 
don't" performance. 



Helen Barnthouse entertained her 
mother several days last week. 



Gladys Reichert attended Phi Kappa 
Theta Dance Saturday evening in 
Chicago. 



Theta Psi entertained Misses Shug 
and Wessberg, and Mrs. Hanson over 
the week end. 



Flora Shattuck and Josephine 
Clarke are suffering from mumps — 
Hope to see you out soon, girls. 



Lillian Stephens entertainedWill- 
iam Wilson of Bloomington. Indiana 
over the week end. 



Sigma Tau had as its guests over 
the week end, Jessie Carr, Delia 
Babcock, Katherine McCutcheon, and 
Dorothea Wales. 



THE STENTOR 



195 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

EXPRESSMAN 



Special Attention Given to Students 

TELEPHONE j 
NUMBERS t 



Residence 675 
Office 384 



^^^MxS^j^m^M^^^^xJ^mxS^xJxJ^* 



The \,/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Dr. G. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



£JLASS Pins and Rings. 

^~ > ^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 

SPIES BROS. 2 J H TcaTo 

mimmMiiiiiiiiumuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiH 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 



/^> For Light 

f T /7 $ For Heat 
KJW*3 For Power 

North Shore Gas Co. 

■■■ill 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusive 
Dry Goods Store 



^sfShopfor 
'Womens&Childrens Furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" .0 



Alumni Notes 

1895. Joseph Park MacHatton, the 
son of Rev. Burtis R. MacHatton of 
Great Palls, Montana, was killed in 
action on the French front October 
5. He was in the 8th regiment of 
the marine corps. In 1915, at the 
age of 17, he went to Europe as a 
special war correspondent for the 
Pittsburg Leader. His earlier educa- 
tion, when his father was pastor of 
the American Church at Leipsic, had 
made him proficient in both French 
and German. When America entered 
the war he came back home and en- 
listed. A newspaper cut which we 
have seen shows a face of remarkable 
strength and beauty. Besides his 
father, he leaves a younger brother, 
Robert, now a student of engineering 
at Ft. Collins, Colo. 

Mr. MacHatton reports a pastorate 
full of activity and interest in his 
Congregational Church at Great Falls. 
A recent series of Lenten services and 
"Community Sings" was held at the 
largest theater in the city, with more 
than 1,000 turned away each time. 

1901. George W. Dowice, Ph. D., for 
some years assistant professor of 
Economics at Michigan University, 
is now in the same department at 
Minnesota. 

1913. Rev. J. R. Sillars has resigned 
his pastorate at Crawfordsville, Ind., 
and accepted a call to Delavan, 111. 

1916. Lieut. F. Sumner Hunt has re- 
turned from army service to his 
former work as ceramic engineer 
with the Beaver Falls, Pa., Art Tile 
Co. 

1918-17. We are informed indirectly 
but creditably of the recent marriage 
of Ensign Fred E. Jansen and Miss 
Marion Bishop of Sycamore, 111. 

1917. Lieut. Paul H. Fuller is at- 
tending Occidental College near Los 
Angeles, Calif., in the hills. The 
college is about the same size as Lake 
Forest with a good deal of the same 
character as to living conditions and 
spirit. He hopes to be graduated in 
1920. 




Shay, Whash ish Thish? 

Once a big molice pan 
Saw a b'.ttle lum 
Sitting on a sturb cone 
Chewing gubber rum. 

Said the big molice pan 
"Won't you simme gome?" 
"Tinny od your nin-type." 
Said the bittle lum. 

— -Ex — 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Established 1871 



Geo. Middendorf 
Co. 

Wholesale Produce 
73-75 W. South Water Street 

Telephone Randolph 1880 

CHICAGO 



The 
Cahert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop 
Phone 1 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

Why? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill'* Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



'LTT'D'ErT CTZ"V Successor to 

KLdHLOIVI Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Larsr 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxic ab Company 

For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 21 



196 



THE STENTOR 



niiiiiiiii 



iiiiiiiiiiranKiHBaiiBti iiiiiiibiiiiiiiii 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S.A.T.C, the college work for the rest of the 
year has been reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — continues 
for this year; consequently the third term opened on Tuesday, April 1. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1S68. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, 111. 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



C.G.Wenban & Son 
Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



. Suits Callid For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing ■ Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 

Cleaning and Pressing 



Pressing- 



Si. 50 
.50 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



Th 



J 



AMES MITCHELL 
E WELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The Market Square Restau- 
rant and Tea Room 

Open 7:00 a- m. to 8:00 p. m. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ana 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



j. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL 

Oscar Pierson 

FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 

Lake Forest, HI. 



M. H. Hussey & Co . 

Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



VOLUME XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST. ILLINOIS, MAY 1G, 1919. 



NUMBER 2 6 



The Burglar 

A very clever and interesting little 
comedy was given last Friday even- 
ing for our guests at interscholastics. 

The cast consisted of five girls and 
a kitten. The characters were Peg- 
gy, the owner of the Summer Cottage 
in which the excitement occurred, 
played by Anne Merner, whose lone- 
someness for Jack called out the in- 
tense sympathy of the audience. 
Margaret Horton as Val, one of 
Peggy's guests, pretended bravery 
but was frightened to death all of the 
time. Lorraine Mac-lay as Edith, the 
one who always screamed when she 
was frightened, uttered little chok- 
ing sounds to the great amusement 
of the spectators, while Mabel, played 
by Eleanor Goble, who thought she 
could never utter a sound when 
frightened, gave vent to wild 
shrieks. But the valiant but sleepy 
Frieda, played by Gwendolyn Massey, 
saved the day and stood guard with 
her trusty weapon, finally even risk- 
ing her life in seeking out the dis- 
turber. When she had finally found 
him and appeared on the stage hold- 
ing a small maltese kitten in her 
hand, the girls' fears were dispersed. 

The play was very well coached 
and acted. The characters were logi- 
cally cast and much credit is due to 
Mr. Troutman and the performers 
for providing a fine means of enter- 
tainment for our visitors. 



South Bend Team Wins 
Expression Contests 

Competition Unusually Keen this Year. 



Y. W. C. A. Meeting 

Last Thursday evening the Y. W. 
C. A. held a very interesting meet- 
ing. Irene Farwell played a piano 
selection, which everyone enjoyed. 
We were very glad to have Mrs. 
Bridgman with us for the evening. 
Her subject was Immortality. She 
brought out the thought of the joy 
of death rather than its sorrow, and 
opened a new field of vision to us. 
Mrs. Bridgman's talks are always 
helpful and inspiring; we wish that 
she might be with us more often. 

Harriet Harris entertained Miss 
Jessie Kaiser and Tena Johnson over 
the week end. 



Previous Winners 

1911 — Freeport. 

1912 — West Division. Milwaukee.. 

1913 — West Division, Milwaukee. 

1914 — New Trier. 

1915 — South Bend, Indiana. 

1916 — McKinley, Chicago. 

1?17 — Oak Park, River Forest. 

ISIS — McKinley, Chicago. 

Limitations of space confine us 
to giving this year only the summa- 
ries of the expression contests and 
a brief criticism of each of the 
competitions written in each case 
by one of the judges. The day was 
delightful, the details worked out 
smoothly and the competition was, 
as usual, keen. Twenty-two schools 
were entered as follows: 
Illinois: Deerfield-Shields, New 
Trier. La Grange, Proviso Township, 
Elgin, Bloomington, Joliet, Free- 
port, Riverside. Oak Park, and from 
Chicago, Hyde Park, Lake View, 
and McKinley. 

Indiana: Valparaiso, South Bend, 
Mishawaka, and Culver Academy. 
Wisconsin: Racine, Kenosha, and 
Washington High, Milwaukee. 

As the tables belo\v show, the 
team prize, a silver bowl, went to 
South Bend, which won first place 
in letter-writing and second in oral 
discussion, a total of 13 points. 
Washington High, Milwaukee, with 
first place in oral discussion (10 
points) was second: and Lake View, 
Chicago, with second in letter-writ- 
ing and third in oral discussion ( s 
points), was third. The names of 
the South Bend team were Lucile 
Gerber. Dorothy Geltz, Carl Baum- 
gartner, and Douglas Owen, with Miss 
Keller of the English staff as adviser 
and chaperon. 

The individual winners were as 
follows: it is noteworthy that the 



girls carried off the prizes, especially 
in the oral discussion: 
Oral Discussion: 

Gold Medal, Lucile Gerber, South 
Bend. Silver Medal. Kelen Rob- 
bins. Hyde Park. 
Reading: 

Gold Medal, Assunda Barardi,.Oak 
Park. Silver Medal, Undine 
Dunn. Lake View. 
Letter-writing: 

Gold Medal, Dorothy Geltz, South 
Bend. Silver Medal, Emmanuel 
Goodman, Kenosha. 
Honorable mention should be 
made of A. C. Campbell, Senn, and 
Morris Sostrin, Proviso, who won 
first and second places in their 
groups in oral discussion in the pre- 
liminaries, but whose team average 
was such as to exclude them from 
the finals. 

READING 

In general it may be said of the 
contestants in the reading contest 
that the average in pronunciation 
and enunciation was excellent, 
with one or two exceptions. In most 
cases the variety in expression was 
limited, making the effect rather 
monotonous. There was dearth of 
real dramatic ability, however, the 
voices averaged well but many of the 
readers failed to realize the possi- 
bilities in their own voices and 
lacked experience in handling them. 
In all cases the self possession of the 
readers was apparently excellent. 

Only a few of the contestants 
stated their subjects but, when done, 
thus added much to the intelligent 
interest of the audience. In the 
few cases where careful attention 
was paid to preliminary details; that 
is the bow. address to the chairman 
of the meeting, and graceful exit, a 
finish was given to the performance 
which counted for much with the 
judges. . I. W. B. 



19S 



THE S T E N T O R 



DISCUSSION 

It was in amplifying, in giving 
body to an idea without badly re- 
peating it, that the speakers in the 
oral discussions were, one felt, n^ost 
lacking. Of bald repetition there 
was enough: one reriiembered Lewis 
Carroll's "What I tell you three 
times is true." On the credit side 
there was a refreshing absence of 
declamation in style and delivery, 
an agreeable variety in the kinds 
of subjects chosen, and in the case 
of almost all the speakers a sense 
of really intimate commerce with 
their audience. On the whole these 
talks seemed to the writer to be as 
good as any he had heard in our 
interscholastic contests. 

R. P. S. 
LETTERS 

The letter-writing contest of the 
Interscholastic doubled its output 
this year by the simple device of re- 
quiring two letters from every con- 
testant. The first was to be sent to 
an author expressing pleasure in 
some book of his. The second was 
the draft of a petition to the con- 
testant's school board asking for 
some school improvement. 

Of the two, the latter effort was 
almost invariably much more ade- 
quate to the occasion. The need of 
an athletic field is a subject on which 
the high school student can speak 
with force and facts. And, aside 
from some indecision as to whether 
a committee is "it" or "they", he has 
no difficulty in finding the proper 
English to voice his petition. 

Letters to authors are apparently 
not so well connected with the high 
school existence. The contestants 
had a narrow range of acquaintance 
with modern authors and they had 
no very clear idea why those they 
knew should have pleased them. One 
refreshing note was written to Kauf- 
man concerning his book on the Jew- 
ish religion; another equally good 
congratulated Mrs. Rhinehart on 
"K". Both showed a clear idea of 
the effect the hook in question was 
meant to produce; neither had suc- 
cumbed to stage fright in the presence 
of His Eminence, the Author. 

M. H. A. 



Judges 


Oak Park 


Senn 


C. Mather 


3 


1 


W. Rice 


1 


3 


Miss Tremain 1 


2 


Total 


5 


6 


Rank 


1 


2 



Table of Points 

READING FINALS 101». 

Joliet 

5 
5 
5 



LaGrange 
4 
4 
3 



Riverside 
2 
2 
4 



15 

5 



11 

4 



DISCUSSION FINALS 



Judges 



i 2 1 - 



W. Rice 
Sibley 

F. I. Walker 
Total Rank 
Team Total 
in 2nd 
Performance 
Team Rank 
in 2nd 
Performance 
Team Rank 
in 1st 

Performance 
Final Team 

Total 
Individual 
rank 1st 
Performance 
Individual 
rank 2nd 
Performance 
Final Indiv- 
idual rank 



o 

9 

22 



2 

1 

7 

10 



M 

- £ 

M.O.- 

a °E 

Kir. 

10 
9 
6 

25 



- a 
i 5 

e | 

Su.to 

a • r 

5-SJ 

OK 



* s 



S i. 

*>£ 

a s 



£W 



14 3 5 

4 2 6 10 

2% 4% 2y 2 10 

7% 10% 11% 25 



1 
11 



6 
8 

4% 
18% 



46 



35 



IS 



3 6 % 



29% 



3% 
4% 



5 3 % 

10 6 % 

92272735 

S 7 2 9% 1 3 5 9% 

17 9 4 16% 3 10 8 14% 



1 
3 

1 6 

4 6 

5 12 



TEAM TOTAL POINTS 



School 








03 
'J. 


* 


Letter- 








writing 








Reading 


5 


\ 


1 


Oral 








Discussion 








Total 


5 


i 


1 


Rank 


4 


6 


12 



k X 



M3 
;£* 



T3 

I* 

■P *- 
SlCO 

X^ 



11 



4 


S 


10 


6 




4 


13 


10 


S 


4 


6 


1 


2 


3 


6 



1 HEAR that Kenneth has a new 
car. 



Lorain Smith '17 is also intending 
to get a Carr. 



Anne Sillar entertained Eleanor 
Goble, Winifred Mack, Hazel Seg- 
uin and Ruth Kenyon at her home 
in Plainfield, Illinois. 



Miss Hospes is entertaining her 
sister. Mrs. Mee, at Lois Hall. 



Lillian Evans is spending several 
days at home in Racine, Wis. 



From the way the girls handled 
that gun the other night, it might 
be a good thing to start a class 
in present arms. 



Virginia Wales spent the week end 
at home in Rogers Park. 



THE STENTOR 



Deer field - Shields Victor in Track Meet 



199 



The fifteenth interscholastic games 
have come and gone, and generally 
speaking were pretty much of a suc- 
cess. The day while clear still had 
a sharp wind from off the lake, and 
this fact undoubtedly militated against 
faster time in some of the events. 
although a comparison of our score 
card with that of the Beloit meet 
shows that the contestants here, put 
out as good an article as the athletes 
gathered at the Wisconsin school. 
As a matter of fact the records here 
had a shade the better of it taken all 
around. The time made by the 
crack relay team from Crawfords- 
ville, Indiana in the half mile event 
was pretty close to a record for the 
four men stepped it off in 1:37. The 
hundred yard dash was done in good 
time. 10:3, V. Arens of Lake View 
High School being the winner. This 
young fellow, by the way is considera- 
ble pacer, and the manner in which 
he ran the other dash events is going 
to make him a valuable man in any 
college he selects as his Alma Mater, 
hake View with its three man team 
made a very creditable showing all 
around, and it is to be regretted that 
they and one or two other teams suf- 
ferred by an unforeseen circumstance 
relative to the drawing for heats in 
the dashes. Owing to the late ar- 
rival of several of the schools it was 
impossible to draw for the several 
heats in these events, and the result 
was that in one or two instances fast 
men from the same s bool drew first 
and second with only first place quali- 
fying them for places in the semi- 
finals. 

A word must be said about the 
<onduct of the athletes contesting. 
In previous years there has always 
been some jarring incident of rowdy- 
ism of one sort or another to mar the 
pleasantness of the day. but a more 
gentlemanly group of young fellows 
has never been assembled on Farwell 
Field in the experiences of the writer. 
The accompanying coaches were sing- 
ularly devoid of that rough neck 
attitude which has not been altogeth- 
er lacking in previous years. The 



little act of cooperation and courtesy 
on the part of Coach Rothacker of 
Deerfield-Shields in supplying two 
javelins from his own school when the 
only one on the field was broken 
must be acknowledged here. 

The only criticism of the meet must 
be registered against our own student 
body. Anyone present would have 
noticed about three o'clock in the 
afternoon a funeral cortege passing 
the field. It was the burial of Col- 
lege Spirit, and it was certainly bad 
taste on the part of the Students 
in charge to have the funeral pro- 
cession pass the athletic field at such 
a time. The obsequise were pro- 
nounced by the Reverend Gentle 
Boredom who was assisted by such 
well known campus celebrities as 
General Indifference, Lois Hall Dates, 
Ti'erry Hall Fussers, City Cut-tips. 
and the other hangers-on of the 
student body. When these individu- 
als and their activites assume active 
charge of the student life, the result 
is always a funeral of the above- 
mentioned type, but it is very seldom 
that there is so flagrant a demonstra- 
tion as was evident at last Saturday's 
games. Before we can have a 
healthy life on the campus it is 
necessary to get rid of this attitude 
which a few certain individuals on 
the campus seem to possess at pres- 
ent.-— that they are doing the col- 
lege a favor by attending it. Until 
such an attitude is frowned down by 
the healthier enthusiastic members 
who really believe in the institution, 
there will be no life on the campus 
either in athletic or in any other line 
of student activity. Get rid of the 
knockers, and ask them to move on, 
or get busy for, not against the col- 
lege, for it has enough to contend 
with without devoting any energy 
to their cases. 

The very fine spirit demonstrated 
by Carl Hellberg who acted as clerk 
of the course and smoothed away a 
great deal of the grit that inevitably 
crept into the wheels, should have 
been an object lesson to those mal- 
contents who hung around and did 



nothing, or worse, did nothing and 
criticized what was being done. 

Lucius Legner as manager deserves 
great credit for the hard work he put 
in, and the success of the event was 
largely due to his efforts. To the 
other men who gave their time and 
energy to helping in running off the 
events, all thanks and praise is given; 
they are the people who make the 
college. 

Mr. Herman Olcott of Great Lakes 
ran the events off in quick time and 
a satisfactory manner. To his friends 
and acquaintances of the campus it 
is a matter of satisfaction to hear 
that he has been appointed as fresh- 
man coach at Yale for this coming 
year. 

TABLE OK POINTS 

Deerfield 3 3 Joliet 7 

University Proviso ti 

High 28 Senn 6 

La Grange ...Is Evanston .... 5 

Lake View... 9 Crawfordsville .". 

Led by D. Kimball, who scored 
14 points. Deerfield High won the 
fifteenth annual interscholastic track 
and field meet with 3 3 points. Uni- 
versity High was second with 2S 
points, and La Grange third with is. 

To Capt. Jones of University High 
went the honors of being the indi- 
vidual star. The leader of the Mid- 
way prep school team scored 15 
points. He won the running broad 
jump. 100 yard dash, and 220 yard 
low hurdles. 

Kimball scored 14 points for Deer- 
field by winning the running high 
jump and finishing second in the 
120 yard high hurdles, 220 yard 
low hurdles, and javelin throw. 

Mohr of University High won 1 
points by capturing first places in 
the twelve pound shot put and poL 
vault. 

One hundred and twenty athletes, 
representing ten schools, took part 
in the meet, which was a hard 
fought struggle from the start be- 
tween Deerfield and University High. 

(Continued on next page) 



THE 

CLARK 

TEACHERS ' 

AGENCY. 



30TH YEAR. 



VACANCIES for SEPTEMBER nt SALARIES 

larsrer tli:m ever before offered 

OXE REGISTRATION PERMANENT 

FOR ALL OFFICE'S 

CHATTANOOGA. 
CHICAGO NEW YORK BALTIMORE. MD. TENN. 

64 E. Van Buren St. Flatiron Bliio Munsey Bldg. Temple Court Bldg. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. ST. PAUL, MINN. SPO KAN E. WASH . 

N. Y. Life Bldg. Exchange Bank Bldg. Chamber of Commerce Bldg. 



/. B. Veselsky 



Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 855 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



200 



THE ST EN TOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 
Lillian Evans, '19. 
Harriet Harris, '19. 
Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 
Lydia Sprecher, '19. 
Ruth Stommel, '19. 
Eleanor Goble, '21. 

Business Managers: 
Agnes Hoffman, '19. 
Margaret Horton, '19. 

Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 
Paul Offenheiser, '21. 
Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 
Horace Horton, '2 0. 
Howard Wood, '22. 
Raymond Moore, '21. 

Professor W. R. Bridgeman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 76 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



COMMENCEMENT is again loom- 
ing into view. As far as the 
rushed and heavily burdened seniors 
are concerned is"galloping"into view. 
For the last two years many of the 
old commencement season traditions 
have been laid aside. There has 
been danger that this temporary 
laying aside of customs might prove 
to be permanent. However, the 
class of 1919 is making an effort to 
resurrect and put into practice all 
the frills as well as the spirit of 
an old fashioned Lake Forest Com- 
mencement. Saturday will be Alum- 
ni Day, there will be a senior Dance 
after the Alumni dinner. Monday 
will be Class Day and preparations 
are under way for a 'peppy' and 
interesting day. 

As these old customs are being 
reinstituted there is a good deal of 
feeling that a new one might very 
well be introduced. That is that 
seniors shall be exempt from the 
final exams of the term. Other class- 
es before this one have suggested it, 
and it is a standing rule in many col- 
leges and universities. Under the 
usual strain of excitement and ad- 
ditional work exams are a real hard- 
ship and of practically no benefit 
at the very end. of a student's col- 
lege experience. 



TRACK EVENTS 

(Continued from 3rd page) 

140 yard run — Won by Masek, 
Proviso; Corrigan, La Grange, sec- 
ond; Mcintosh, Deerfield, third 
Time — : 5 5 3-5. 

Shot put, 12 pounds — Won by 
Mohr. University High; Voynow, 
Senn, second; Button, Joliet, third. 
Distance — 3 7 feet 5 inches. 

Running broad jump — Won by 
Jones, University High : Schweger, 
Senn, second; Arens, Lake View, 
third. Distance — IS feet 6 inches. 

2 20 yard dash — Won by Arens, 
Lake View; Stewart, Deerfield, sec- 
ond; Mason, Deerfield, third. Time 
— :24 4-5. 

Mile run — Won by Berry. La 
Grange; Dano, Joliet, second; Wid- 
ney, Proviso, third. Time — 4:58. 

100 yard dash — Won by Jones, 
University High; Arens, Lake View, 
second; Wootaw, Evanston High, 
third. Time — : 10 3-5. 

120 yard high hurdles — Won by 
Patterson, Crawfordsville; D. Kim- 
ball, Deerfield, second: Wootaw, 
Evanston, third. Time — :16 4-5. 

220 yard low hurdles — Won by 
Jones, University High; D. Kimball, 
Deerfield, second; Cogan, University 
High, third. Time — :27 4-5. 

Running high jump — Wan by D. 
Kimball. Deerfield; Evans, Evanston, 
second; Milliken, University High, 
third. Height — 5 feet G inches. 

S80 yard run — Won by Corri- 
gan, La Grange; Pickard, La Grange, 
second; Newman, University High, 
third. Time — :2:11 

Javelin throw — Won by W. Kim- 
ball, Deerfield; D. Kimball, ^Deer- 
field, second: Hey, La Grange, third. 
Distance — 14 6 feet. 

Pole vault — Won by Mohr, Univer- 
sity High; Sheridan, Deerfield, sec- 
ond; Cossitt. La Grange, third. 
Height — 9 feet 1 %, inches. 

Discus throw — Won by W. Kim- 
ball. Deerfield: Sehring, Joliet, sec- 
ond; Bell, Deerfield, third. Distance 
— SS feet. 

Apparently college spirit among 
freshmen on the campus is confined 
largely to the non-fraternity group 
of men. if the recent interscholastic 
is any criterion, for they were the 
only ones in addition to a few Kappa 
Sigma freshmen who were in evi- 
dence when any work was to be 
done. It really took an alumnus of 
the institution to display the proper 
sort of spirit, when he gave his 
whole time and attention to the af- 
fairs of the meet and in helping to 
make it a success. Atta boy Hell- 
berg. 



Jen and Mary 

OUR OWN NOVELINE 
DORTHEA'S DECISION 
SHE LOVED HIM BUT — 

Now it was early May, the time 
when bright green benches are set 
up along the lake shore, the blissful 
Season when Krafts' and Monahans' 
are full to overflowing and when 
every maiden fat, lean, or a perfect 
thirty-six feels a compelling spirit 
buried somewhere in the depths of 
her heart that moves her to a double 
chocolate soda or a fresh strawberry 
Sundee, and shy young men date 
up the dashing lovely maiden and 
blush at their temerity. And thus 
it was that James O'Leary Jones 
raced across the South campus feel- 
ing the cinders cut through the 
brown paper soles of his second best 
dancing pumps and knowing that 
his tie was crooked, his hair and 
teeth unbrushed and his face but 
half-washed, he suddenly felt sing- 
ing in his veins the Spring song of 
Romance. True he had arisen late, 
dressed in a hurry and probably 
looked a fright, but with romance 
in his soul, his heart leaps up and 
James O'Leary Jones knew that 
night he would be dating. He 
dashed up the steps of College Hall, 
stopped on the third step from the 
top and turning, surveyed the on 
coming throng of Lois Hallers. 
With the eye of a connoisseur this 
timid youth, now, in truth a re- 
awakened lion, selected a damsel 
who all things considered was a 
swell looker. "Neat little woman," 
said James to himself, "her rouge's 
on crooked and her marcel ain't so 
good but what can you expect at 
an eight o'clock"? Nonchalantly 
balancing on one foot he waited 
until the charming Dorothea had 
reached the step below him, then 
lightly catching her elbow he drew 
her up beside him. She responded 
in the desired way — that is to say 
with "a come and take me look" 
and a general impression of sweet 
femininity and lov' me Tale. 

"Going to be busy tonight?" 
"Not especially, why." 

"Let's have a party — lake's pretty 
good these nights don't you thing?" 

"Oh you funny thing — you tickle 
me to death" — 

"Well, don't forget — we're seeing 
how the lake looks tonite" — 

(Continued in our next) 






THE S T E N T O R 



Northwestern Wins First 
Conference Game 



Friday afternoon Northwestern 
College of Naperville took the first 
"Little Five" game from Lake Forest 
in a game featuring chiefly errors. 
Because of cold weather Morley was 
unable to get his arm in shape, and 
the visitors got a comfortable lead 
before Lake Forest started. Nef 
took the box in the sixth inning 
and the team tightened up, out play- 
ing Northwestern the last four in- 
nings, and starting several rallys 
which threatened to win the game. 



If our team plays the brand of 
ball exhibited in the last innings 
when playing N. W. Friday, and Val- 
paraiso Saturday, it will undoubtedly 
"bring home the bacon." 

For Lake Forest Eddy played a 
very good game, getting three out of 
five hits. ""Tlis throw to 2nd caught 
more than one of the visitors asleep. 
Grausdeu and Niergrath featured at 
the bat for the visitors. Stenger also 
played a good game. 



N. W. C. 



R. H. 

Abraham r. f 

Birback, 2b 1 

Meuhl, s.s 1 

Stenger, 3b 2 2 

Barney, of 1 

Grausden, lb 1 3 

Zazen, l.f 

Niergrath, c 2 2 

Schneller, p 1 




4 

2 

7 
1 
13 




L. F. C. 

R. 

Frieble, 3b 

Morley, p., r.f 

Nef, r.f., p . .1 

Eddy, c 

Legner, lb 1 

Maplesden, 2b 

Chapman, l.f 

Beddoes, c.f 

Eichofi, s.s 



H. P. A. 



3 14 

9 

1 3 






Total 7 10 27 7 Total . . . 

Northwestern — 12 12 1 — 7. 

Lake Forest — 00000000 2 — 2. 

Two base hits — Grausden, Mergrath. 

Double play — Nef to Legner. 

Strike outs — Schneller 12, Morley 9, Nef. 4. 

Base on balls — Schneller 2, Morley S, Nef 5. 



5 27 



201 

Wearers of the L. F. 

Some of the students at Lake For- 
est have forgotten, if they ever knew, 
the real meaning of our College 
colors and monogram. 

A man who wears the L. F. is 
proud to wear it. He has worked 
hard for it, and is as jealous of it. 
and rightly so, as any monarch of 
his crown. His sweater has a mean- 
ing outside his college as well as 
within. It is, or should be, every 
where recognized as emblematical of 
work and college spirit — something 
accomplished for his school and him- 
self. If he wears a star, or by 
chance a white captain's monogram, 
it certainly should be a distinction. 

Some of us have noticed a certain 
laxness on the part of some of the 
student body regarding the wearing 
of the colors and monogram. Un- 
doubtedly this is due to thoughtless- 
ness, but lets check it before it goes 
too far. Some men have been wear- 
ing sweaters regardless of mono- 
grams and stars, and some have been 
wearing colors who are not entitled 
to them. What do you think of all 
these bogus war heroes who have 
never been across, yet wear service 
and wound chevrons as well as "dutch 
decorations? There is no need of ex- 
pressing our opinion of such a man, 
yet it is the same spirit which 
causes a man to wear a white mono- 
gram, or extra stars when he is not 
(Continued on next, page) 





The Original 

" M a b 1 e S y k e s " 

DIAMOND MEDAL -:- ARTIST -:- PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 

140 North State Street 

(Opposite Fields cor. State and Randolph Sts.) 

Established at present location since 1906 

MAKER OF HY-CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 

Phone Central 5341 



202 



THE STENTOR 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



Sport Cloths, Cricket and 

Tennis 

Flannels in Abundance 




CLOTH SATISFACTION' IS 
THE FIRST STEP IN 
CLOTHES SATISFAC- 
TION. 

There is practically no end 

to the variety of fabrics 

here — ready to choose 
from — 

Fabrics having distinction 
and individuality — 

Fabrics of the latest weaves 
and of the finest textures. 

DEPENDABLE FABRICS 

You'll appreciate our rich 

assortment. 

Prices $40, $45, $50 
and upwards 

Jerrems Tailoring appeals to 
men who never overdo — 
especially in clothes. 




|£//2^ 



Tailor for Young Men 

Three Stores: 

7 North La Salle St. 

314 S Michigan Ave. 

7 I E. Monroe St. 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 




The daily use ol 

KOSMEO CREAM 

audi 

KOSMEO POWDER 

ancl a weekhj visit to 

Mrs. Graham s 
Beauty Shop 

1432 Stevens Bldg. 

will create a perfect 

complexion. 

TRY IT. 



use BQWMAN^S safe milk 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-109 Vine Ave. 



Wearers of L. F. 

(Continued from 5th page) 

entitled to them. Let's watch our- 
selves and others too, and see that 
Varsity men only wear letters, and 
only the monogram for their branch 
of athletics. 

A complete list of wearers of the 
L. F. is published below with the 
branch of athletics and the number of 
years after each name. Now it up 
to the student body. Let's boost 
athletics and the legitimate wearers 
of the L. F. 
John Rees — Football, white. 

Basketball, 1 star. 
Chester Davis — Football, 2 stars. 
Lucius Legner — Baseball. 
Stuart Eddy — Basketball, 1 star. 

Baseball. 
Harold Eichoff — Baseball. 
Lawrence Maplesden — Basketball. 
Keith Marsh — Basketball, 1 star. 
Franklin Montgomery — Football. 
Gordon Summer — Basketball, 1 star. 

Baseball. 
Ned McCormick — Basketball. 
John Schick — Basketball. 

Colors — 
McEvoy — Football. 
Petersen — Football. 
L. Hale — Football. 

C. Johnson — Football. 

D. Dees — Basketball. 



Alumni Notes 

As directed by the present rule, 
a committee of the Alumni have 
reported to the Secretary of the 
Alumni Association the names of 
John H. Jones and Marion Woolsey, 
both of '96, as candidates for the 
Alumni Trusteeship at the June e- 
lection. These names will accord- 
ingly be sent out to the Alumni. A 
brief statement of the history of 
the two men since leaving college 
may be useful. It should be men- 
tioned that they are warm friends 
and each boosting for the other. 

John H. Jones, leaving college at the 
end of his junior year for urgent 
reasons, for some years had charge 
of a book and stationery business 
at Clinton, Iowa, his home. In 1899 
he entered the employ of Allyn and 
Bacon of Boston, the publishers, as 
a traveling agent, in which work 
he proved very successful, establish- 
ing a wide acquaintance and gaining 
a thorough knowledge of the western 
field. Through steady and rapid 
promotion he became in time the 



THE BTENTOE 



203 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

EXPRESSMAN i 

<£ Special Attention Given to Students <J> 

TELEPHONE / Residence 675 J> 

NUMBERS - Office 384 

The V^/uality Tire Co. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Dr. C. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

1 2 : 1 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



IHIIIIIIilililllilllllllHIUIIIIIII 

(^LASS Pins and Rings. 
^~ > ^ Fraternity and Sorority 
jewelry. Programs. 

SPIES BROS. 2 J £ TcTgZ 

mmm\)mm\\\m\\mm\mmm\im\mhw\\m\kmw\mu\> 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAUR4NT & LUNCH ROOM 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



Gas 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 

^'i^ 1, ' ■ l: r: 1 ": 1 :. - : :;'■: : ; : "'■• 

For Light 
For Heat 
For Power 

North Shore Gas Co. 

' - 

Telephone 1071 

CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



superintendent of agents in the Chi- 
cago office, and a few years since, 
general manager of that large office. 
In high character, business ability, 
knowledge of educators and educa- 
tional problems, and constant in- 
terest in Lake Forest, he is admira- 
bly fitted for the office. 
Mr. Woolsey was one of the promi- 
nent men in the college in the '9 0's, 
by reason of his deeds, rather than 
words. Probably the best football 
player, by reason of his weight and 
strength and Scotch grit, the college 
has ever developed, he always stood 
for honorable and sound standards 
in all activities, and no man was 
more respected. On leaving he 
studied civil engineering at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois for a time and 
subsequently worked at his profes- 
sion, becoming in time chief engineer 
of the Rock Island & Peoria R. R.. 
and asst. chief of the Chicago, Rock 
Island, and Pacific. Later he be- 
came connected with the great 
Walsh Construction Co. of Daven- 
port. Iowa., and, we believe, since 
then has superintended many im- 
portant contracts for them, especially 
on the New York Central. He is now 
located in Chicago, in charge of 
some extensive work on the Illinois 
Central. He is still a man of few 
words, but one who has done things, 
and his interest, in Lake Forest is 
shown in action. 

This election is no business of 
the alumni editor, but why not elect 
both these men? They would carry 
weight in every way on the Board 
of Trustees. 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



TRACK EVENTS 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students The 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg 



Lake Forest's only exclusive 
Dry Goods Store 





Hall freshman. 

The standing broad grin won by 
Tommie Tucker. 

The high spit won by Keith Marsh. 

The inside run won by Dule Hiscox. 



JnnvY'nnnc; l The long distance talk won by Chat 
UR T UU UUj_ Taylor 
/■f Shop for 

The 220 giggle won by Ruth Kenyon. 



'WomensfxChildrens Furnishings 

South Side of "Market Square" 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Lady will sell large 50 in. $250 

size mahogany grand opera phono- 
graph and 200 steel needles and re- 
cords. Used few weeks. Will take 
$74 for outfit and ship C. 0. D. on 
approval. Act quick. 
Mrs. Waverly-Brown, 317 Greenleaf 

Ave.. Wilmette, 111., near Linden 

Sta. Mil. Electric. 



The 
Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone I 7 Lake Forest, 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD. Prop. 
Phone 175 

Why? 

Ask any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



FFTDITT C1ZV Successors 

J\.Ul5r!/1^0JV I Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxi cab Company 



For Best Serince 
Day or Night 



Taxisat AllTrains. Call Lake Forest 12 



!04 



THE STENTOB 



Pil!IIIIIIIII!!!l!li:i[[||!ll!!!!!li!!l![l!l!!!!l!!!!!!II 



HiiimiEiiyiiiiiiiisiiiiiiiiiiiiiia 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance ot the S.A.T.C.. the college work for the rest of the 
year has been reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — continues 
for this year; consequently the third term opened on Tuesday, April 1. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1S5S. 

PERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, HI. 



- :.„. ; : '- j,.. \ ' :.,;,. . '. .: : ■ !::!'^.-.. ■ ,'.-:. ■ '... ; . -'.^1'.. ,-.:.:,: ..^..: i :: 1 ::. :,„,,;;.'. :„ .,: :; :!.: . ;!::: : ::;::,.^ 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 
Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

7 MARKET SQUARE 

C.G.Wenban & Son 
Taxi Cabs 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Suits Called For and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 

Cleaning and Pressing 



Pressing; 



$1.50 
.50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 



Phone 2252 




AMES MITCHELL 
EWELER 

Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The Market Square Restau- 
rant and Tea Room 

Open 7:00 a- m. to 8:00 p. m. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ana 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



j. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phone 686 

LAKE FOREST, ILL 

Oscar Pierson 

FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 

Lake Forest, 111. 



M. H. Hussey & Co . 

Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 

Tel. 888, 8Sy LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Kentiug 

All branches insurance written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOKEST, ILLINOIS 









- 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



VOLUME XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, MAY 23, 1919. 



NUMBER 27 



Student Council 
Holds Impor- 
tant Meeting 

The final and the most important 
meeting of the year was held by the 
Student Council, Thursday evening, 
May 20, in the Digamma rooms. 

New officers were elected and took 
their respective chairs, disposing of 
the work at hand with the efficiency 
of veterens. The officers for the next 
year are: 

Mason Armstrong — President. 

Morris Mudge — Vice President. 

Thomas Bosworth — Secretary. 

After careful consideration, the 
council elected the members for the 
Athletic Board for next year. Lois 
Hall will also be represented by one 
of their number choosen by them. 
Tie coach and faculty athletic ad- 
viser will form the balance of the 
boKEd. The Athletic Board for 1919- 
1£20 is: 

Stuart Eddy — President. 

Ned McGormack — Vice President. 

Gordan Sumner — Secretary. 

It is thought by the council that 
the above men best represent the in- 
terests of the students and athletics 
of L. P. and will do their utmost to 
hold up the high standards that old 
Lake Foresters are accustomed to. 

The Council will hold one more 
meeting this year for the purpose of 
installing the new members to be 
elected by this group, when a feed 
and smoker will be given the outgo- 
ing members, by the new members. 



Notice! 

Next week there will be no Sten- 
tor. The week after a Special Senior 
edition will be published. This is 
an unusual double number and peo- 
ple who have not paid their sub- 
scriptions will not receive it. Ex- 
tra copies may be bought for twenty- 
five cents a copy. 

This is your last chance to con- 
tribute to the Stentor this year. Af- 
ter the double number there is only 
the commencement issue. Show 
your spirit by giving us something 
good for the special edition. 



"In India" 

"In India," The Operetta present- 
ed by the Lake Forest University 
School of Music Woman's Chorus last 
Saturday night at The Durand Art 
Institute was a most decided success 
in every way. The stage setting and 
costuming were very spectacular and 
the work of the choruses as well as 
the soloists reflected much credit 
upon Mr. Phillips as director and 
upon Mrs. Phillips as stage manager. 
Special mention should be made of the 
exquisite singing by Marion Cook in 
the role of Meerah, the beautiful one. 
Her voice is unusually clear and 
sweet and her interpretation of the 
part was exceedingly good. Sarah 
Moore as Simla, the Village Pet, 
showed remarkable possibilities in 
the unusual quality of her voice. 
Eulah Winter took the role of How- 
Now, the Village Scold very well in- 
deed and Hazel Fellers displayed 
much talent in her presentation of 
Veerah, The Beggar — both possess 
very good voices. Margaret Best, 
Ruth Kenyon, and Vera Pettigrew 
did very good work as The Three 
Old Women of The Temple. The 
Snake Dance in Act I. by Virginia 
Clarke of Ferry Hall was one of the 
very pleasant features of the even- 
ing. 

Between Acts I. and II. Miss Buz- 
zell of Ferry Hall gave an interpre- 
tive dance, "The Enchantress" which 
was very delightful. A great deal 
of praise is due Miss Buzzell, both for 
her solo dancing and for her work 
in directing the dancing of the 
choruses. 

The five piece orchestra which fur- 
nished the accompaniment was in- 
deed an appreciated attraction and 
added a great deal to the success 
of the Operetta — for no one can 
deny that the whole thing was a most 
decided success, in fact one of the 
best attractions of the kind ever put 
on in the Durand Art Institute. It 
is hoped that there will be more of 
his sort of thing. 

Prof. Troutman and P. L. Offen- 
hiser spent the week-end with friends 
at Illinois U. 



Valparaiso Wins 

Close Game 

Morley took the box against Val- 
paraiso University on the latter's field 
Saturday; and Lake Forest, as a 
whole played its best game of the 
season getting a total of eight hits 
compared to the opponents total of 
five. Frieble netted two hits Satur- 
day. Some of the new men who 
played a good game on Friday seem- 
ed to break under the strain Satur- 
day, one player being directly re- 
sponsible by errors, for five of Val- 
paraiso's runs. 

The game seemed won by an un- 
usual ninth inning rally but the um- 
pire stepped in with an entirely new 
though doubtful decree. He called a 
"balk" on Morley when Jack did not 
have the ball, it resting safely in 
Eddy's mitt waiting fdr some ven- 
turesome runner to wander from the 
protecting shadow of the Keystone 
sack. This play on the part of the 
ump proved to be the best of the day 
for the home team as it brought the 
winning run. 

One thing which was manifested 
at both games was school "pep" and 
spirit. Lake Forest plays Fort Sheri- 
dan here Friday, and meets Wheaton 
on Farwell Field, Saturday. Let's 
get together, forget fussing, and the 
city, and have some of that old time 
"avant le guerre," orangized cheer- 
ing. 

L. F. 50000000 3 — 8. 
Val. 00500100 3 — 9. 
Batteries: 

Morley, Eddy, L. F. 

Kein, Pontu, Davis, Valp. 

Doodles Carr was a guest of 
Kappa Sigma over the week-end. 



Jack Rees was at his home in Elgin 
over the week-end. 



Fred and Lyle Bates visited with 
Digamma last Sunday. 



Jo and Loveridge Martin enter- 
tained Katherine Horton, Lillian 
Stevens, Mark Garrison, and Mr. 
Wheeler of Chicago, at their home in 
Watsekalast week-end. 



206 



THE STENTOR 



Is That So? 

" Bechtel (In Ethics) I was not able 
to get all of the lesson for to-day. 

Dr. Wright. Great minds sometimes 
have little swallows. 



We learn in one of our classes that 
in some places the hills are so steep 
that the farmers plant on both sides. 
They have to be careful lest they 
bother the roots of the plants grow- 
ing on the opposite side of said hills. 



There are wild rumors that the 
boarders at Lois Hall, especially the 
younger generation were forced to 
take a bath in the middle of the 
week. It is also said that there were 
quite a few of the older generation 
present at this unusual ceremony. 



We have a new fraternity on the 
campus and we wish them the best 
of luck. We hope that they are big 
enough to see beyond the fraternity 
and that the big thing in college is 
not just the fraternity, but the col- 
lege as a whole. Some of the older 
fraternities would profit greatly if 
they would add a little college spirit 
to their activities. 



Let us get out Saturday and show 
the base ball team that we have the 
proper spirit and thus help them put 
it over on Wheaton. 



Pramberg; — Are you still GET- 
TING BY. 



Potential energy at rest — John 
Patrick Dougherty. 



A Suggestion! 

It has seemed inadvisable to elect 
a new Stentor Board this year. Per- 
haps next fall is the best time — 
but when the board is elected re- 
member the following underclass- 
men have done good work on the 
paper this year: 

Eleanor Goble, 

Sarah Moore, 

Eugene Tucker, 

Ralph Stuart, 

Lawrence Maplesden, 

Otis Chatfield-Taylor, 

Raymond Moore, 

Mildred Gerlach, 

Beth Thayer, 

Ruth Bahlert, 

Margaret Mills, 

Edith Wise, 

Rachel Hecketsweiler. 



Northwestern Again Defeats 
Lake Forest 



Friday's game at Naperville proved 
to be a repetition of the Northwestern 
game at Lake Forest the preceding 
week. Nef took the box, holding the 
opponents to four hits while Sten- 
ger on the slab for N. W. C. allowed 
seven hits to our "huskies." Errors 



by L. F. were chiefly responsible for 
Northwestern's score, although they 
earned two runs. A belated rally in 
the middle inning netted the Red and 
Black two runs, Eddy and Morley 
scoring. 



Northwestern: 

R. H. P. 

Abraham, rf 1 1 

Boland, ss 2 1 3 

Muhl, 3b 2 

Grisden, lb 2 10 

Stenger, p 1 1 

Neigrath, c, 1 1 6 

Koten, 2b 1 

Zoken, If 3 

Borney, cf 3 



Lake Forest: 



A. 

1 



2 

1 

3 

1 

1 







Legner, lb 

Frieble, 3b 

Morley, rf 1 

Eddy, c 1 

Nef, p 

Maplesden, 2b 

Eichoff, ss 

Beddoes, cf 

Chapman, If 



R. H. P. 

.0 10 

3 3 

1 



Total 



.8 4 27 9 Total .... 

N. W. 10304000 — 8. 
L. F. 00000000 2 — 2. 



5 24 15 



Music School Notes 

At a meeting of the students body, 
officers for the ensuing year were 
elected : 

House President — Vesta Vatau. 

Senior President — Dorothy Antrim. 

President Current Events — June 
Suckling. 

Mary Esther Schneck and Leala 
Ruth Moss from Northwestern spent 
Sunday with Alma Boggis at the 
Music School. 



Dorothy Antrim's sisters visited 
her over the week-end. 



Mrs. C. M. Bivins from Lafayette, 
Ind., was the guest of her daughter 
last week-end. 



Maria Vella entertained her bro- 
thers and sister over Sunday. 



Dr. Thomas Addresses 
Y. M. C. A. 

Last Thursday evening the 
Y. M. C. A. held a very interesting 
meeting in the Kappa Sigma Frater- 
nity rooms in Harlan Hall. Dr. M. 
Bross Thomas was the speaker of the 
evening, and he gave a very interest- 
ing talk to the men present. His 
talk was very helpful and inspiring 
and we are in hopes that he may 
meet with us again soon. 



May Festival Next Week 

On Wednesday afternoon, May 28, 
Lake Forest College will celebrate 
its first May Day Festival. We have 
an ideal setting for such an affair 
and the gym classes, under Miss 
Turnbull's direction, have prepared 
a very entertaining program. In 
fact all of the omens pretell a great 
success. There is no reason why the 
affair should not be made an annual 
event of great importance and if ev- 
eryone does his part it will be. 

The crowning of the May Queen 
and winding the Maypole will be of 
course the crowning features. There 
will also be some exquisite solo danc- 
ing and several very pretty group 
dances by the gym classes. The pretty 
costumes and setting added to the 
finished dancing will make the cere- 
mony truly impressive. 

You are hereby invited then, to 
join us in a May Festival, May 2 8 
at 4:30 o'clock. 



Mrs. Moore of Aurora visited Sarah 
at Lois Hall, last week, being here 
for the Operetta. 



The next meeting and probably the 
last meeting of the college Y.M.C.A. 
will be held next Thursday evening 
in the Phi Pi Epsilon rooms. A 
very able speaker has been secured 
and a large attendance is especially 
desired. 



THE STENT OR 



207 



Lake Forest Faculty Upholds 
Old Tradition 

Seniors and Faculty Unite to Preserve School's 
Oldest Unwritten Law 



The- class of 1919 is nothing if 
not public spirited. It has through- 
out the entire year shown a most ex- 
traordinary amount of pep and col- 
lege spirit. It has never considered 
its own welfare but always that of 
the college. A more self-sacrificing 
spirit has seldom been exhibited by 
any preceding class. 

It was with the courage of true 
altruism that the class casting aside 
its own welfare and personal prefer- 
ences resolved to martyr itself upon 
the altar of tradition. It was with 
reluctance that the irrevocable step 
was taken, but duty shouted aloud 
in stern tones and with firm, if re- 
luctant, voice, the youth replied — 
"We will." So merely for the sake 
of its Alma Mater the class drew up 
the time worn petition and with due 
solemnity presented it to the faculty. 

The time before the faculty meet- 
ing was spent in prayer and suppli- 
cation. The class dreaded the result. 
Suppose after all its efforts to up- 
hold this most note worthy of Lake 
Forest's traditions the faculty should 
fail! Suppose the petition should be 
granted! The year's work would 
have been for naught and never again 
would the class be able to hold up 
its head in respectable society. The 
suspense was simply terrible. The 
faith of a few leading lights never 
wavered but most feared for the 
worst. The petition surely would be 
granted and ignominy would wreath 
itself over the brows of 1919. 

The fatal day finally dawned — 
the hour approached. The faces of 
the seniors were haggard. All felt 
that the worst, if the worst came, 
would be borne with stoical fortitude 
but the blow of "No Exams" would 
be almost too much for the most Her- 
culean. It seemed as if the petition 
had been sacrifice enough — to have 
it granted would be adding insult to 
injury. 



"Aha — the phone rings!" 

"Classmates the moment has 
come!" 

"Granted! — Oh curses!" 

As the classes crowded around the 
phone the faces of the strongest 
blanched with terror. Granted — 
who would have suspected such cruel- 
ty in the faculty. Never before had 
a preceding class suffered such 
penance. To deprive 1919 of the oppor- 
tunity of profiting by final exams! 
It. was the blow that killed father! 

Shrieks of woe ascended the 
heavens. Pale faces became lived 
with rage. To think that 1919 was 
missing the climactic epoch of its col- 
lege life. Who could have faith in 
man again? 

With tear choked voices and hys- 
terically suppressed sobs it was de- 
cided to wear black for the rest of 
the year. The class might offer it- 
self as a sacrifice but who would 
have dreamed that the offer would 
be accepted. The faculty should be 
made to see how its cruelty would be 
taken. 

Aha! — the scene changes. The 
weak kneed senior at the phone gasps 
— "Friends and classmates — fret 
not — 'Tis an awful mistake — our 
friends, the faculty have not played 
us dirt! The petition has been re- 
fused! O joy! Oh bliss!! O dough- 
nuts and sassafras!!! We may take 
exams! ! ! ! 

Again shrieks ascend to the star 
spangled heavens. But this time 
they are paens of joy. With shin- 
ing eyes and smile bedecked faces a 
procession is formed and the bringer 
of the false tidings is borne away to 
be tubbed. 

Eleanor Meath, ex. '21, visited 
Ruth Stommel Saturday and Sunday. 



The Student Council 

Elsewhere, in this paper, will be 
found an account of the meeting of 
the Student Council, a body which 
has always had the interests of Lake 
Forest College at heart, one which 
has not been content with merely des- 
tructive criticism but which has al- 
ways followed a constructive policy 
boosting of the college and correct- 
ing whatever faults it has found. In 
this way serving Lois Hall and the 
South Campus. 

As a body it is to be congratulated 
upon its accomplishments, it is truly 
a constructive administrative body, 
and its members may truly feel proud 
of their work, knowing that they 
have done their best and their work 
has been appreciated by the college 
men, women and faculty. 

In naming the Athletic Board for 
the coming year, it has shown re- 
markable judgment and we feel sure 
that no better selection could have 
been made. The President, Stuart 
Eddy, is a man, who has given Lake 
Forest all he has in him, his excel- 
lent spirit in athletics and school ac- 
tivities is unsurpassable and we feel 
sure that the board led by him, with 
the able assistance of McCormack 
and Sumner will prove more than sat- 
isfactory. 

To the outgoing officers of the Stu- 
dent Council, John Reese, Chester 
Davis, Merle McEvoy, Philip Speidel 
and Vernon Downs, we wish to take 
this means to publicly announce our 
appreciation of their work, and hope 
that in the future the student body 
will adopt their principle of construc- 
tive college spirit, setting aside miner 
ersonal and fraternity differences for 
the betterment of OUR COLLEGE. 
Let us come back next year and ALL 
pull for Lake Forest as we have 
never done before, and the result is 
bound to be a happy, unified, student 
body. 



Bea Worthley spent the week-end 
at her home in Joliet. 



Elsie Engel entertained her cousin 
Mildred Friedman over the week- 
end. 



Ruth Kennedy entertained her aunt 
last Wednesday and Thursday. 



- • THE 

. CLARK 
TEACHERS' 
. AGENCY. 

30 TH YEAR. 



VACANCIES for SEPTEMBER at SALARIES 

larger than ever before offered 

ONE REGISTRATION PERMANENT 

FOR ALL, OFFICE'S 

CHATTANOOGA. 

CHICAGO NEW YORK BALTIMORE, MD. TENN. 

64 E. Van Buren St. Flatiron Bldg. Muneey Bldg. Temple Court Bldg. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. ST. PAUL. MINN. SPOKANE, WASH. 

N. Y. Life Bldg. Exchange Bank Bldg. Chamber of Commerce Bldg. 



/. B. Veselsky 



Ladies' Tailor: Dressmaking 

Anderson {Building 

Phone 655 

LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



208 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 
Lillian Evans, '1*. 
Harriet Harris, '19. 
Gwendolyn Massy, '19. 
Lydia Spreeher, '19. 
Ruth Stommel, '19. 
Eleanor Goble, '21. 

Business Managers: 
Agnes Hoffman, '19. 
Margaret Horton, '19. 

Reporters : 

Sara Moore, '21. 
Paul Offenheiser, '21. 
Eugene W. Tucker, '21. 
Horace Horton, '20. 
Howard Wood, "22. 
Raymond Moore, '21. 

Professor W. R. Bridgeman 
Faculty and Alumni. 

Subscription Rates: 

One Year $2.00 

Ten Issues 75 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake For- 
est, Illinois, as second-class matter. 



sion and stimulation which it offers 
to community life. It marks the re- 
turn of the play spirit for all. It 
makes the past line, and because of 
this is educational; for as Holmes put 
it, "What is heard is often for- 
gotten, but what is seen is never for- 
gotten." 

Many of us remember the Shake- 
speare pageant staged three years 
ago by Mr. Clapp. While this little 
May Festival is not nearly so pre- 
tentious yet there is much talent in 
the girls taking part and the Whole 
affair promises to be a lovely, grace- 
ful party. 

If this is a success, as undoubt- 
edly it will be, it is to be hoped that 
a new tradition will have been es- 
tablished at Lake Forest, and that 
May Day will become an important 
date in our calendar. 



Jen and Mary 

OUR OWN NOVELINE 
DORTHEA'S DECISION 
SHE LOVED HIM BUT— 

(Continued from our last. 

* • » • • 



1 






IN view of the approaching date 
set for the Spring Pageant or May 
Day Festival, whichever yau choose 
to call it, it seems fit to say some- 
thing about pageants in general. 

They have been popular through- 
out the country during the past years 
and especially so during the last four 
years of the war when many pa- 
triotic pageants have been staged. 
There are many possibilities for these 
May Day Festivals. It may be a set 
of historic scenes, because nearly ev- 
ery little town or group of people 
has some historical incident that Is 
worth reviewing in some pictur- 
esque form. 

It may be a May party scene with 
quaint folk dances, graceful Greek 
steps, clumsy clown dances and mu- 
sic. 

Another phase of it can be a care- 
fully worked out representation of a 
central idea with scenes interwoven 
as in a drama. 

One of its benefits is that it need 
not be a carefully worked out per- 
formance by professionals but in- 
stead it can be a democratic under- 
taking wherein any body may take 
part. For this reason it fits into 
American life beautifully. 

Another good point is the expres- 



Frosh Frolic 

The freshmen were conspicuous 
by their absence from chapel last 
Friday morning. A few managed to 
straggle in for the last hymn but 
the absence of so many of them at 
once was really remarkable. Later 
the remarkable thing was that they 
hadn't had to cut all their classes in 
order to frolic around as they did. 

It is best to draw a curtain over 
the moments immediately after 

chapel words fail us. Guilty 

consciences are dreadful compan- 
ions — the Frosh, thinking the 
Sophomores were as kittenish as they 
and of the same mental speed, at once 
thought a sophomore meeting would 
be held. Little did they know the 
subtle sophomore! A "Don't Dis- 
turb" on number 5. "Aha! we have 
them!" The sophomores ambling 
down the hall after a peaceful meet- 
ing in another room were stricken 
with amazement to find the entire 
freshmen class hanging over the tran- 
som and around the door of "Suite 
f" Four or five green, giggling 
rosh nearly fell over the transom in 
their efforts to hear the plotting — 
in an empty room. 

The sophs really show the results 
of college training. Frosh you lack 
originality — hasn't your punish- 
ment shown a keen psychological 
analysis of character? In a year or 
two you may be able to pull a really 
clever stunt. 

Elaine Kellogg entertained Helen 
Atwater of Northwestern and Clara 
Johnson of Madison over the week- 
end. 



The man in the moon wore a sen- 
timental smile and the stars were 
winking disgracefully, as our brave 
hero guided the fair Dorothea past 
the perils of Deerpath Avenue. Em- 
boldened by two strawherry sundaes 
and a double chocolate marshmal- 
low he had bravely confessed his un- 
dying love to the blushing fair one. 

Her answer was sweet, sacchaiv 
inely sweet but very indefinite. 

"Aw, tell me," he pleaded, "Make 
me the happiest man on earth." 

Still she would not promise. Per- 
haps, he thot, if he could see under 
that cartwheel lid — but then he 
never could read eyes, anyhow — 
why — he might mistake a twinkle 
for a spark of love. 

At last he remembered the crown- 
ing speech in the one love story he 
knew. Drawing himself to his full 
height — almost an inch above the 
brim of her hat — he said darkly — 

"Say yes, Dotty, say yes or I'll, I'll 
— I'«U end it .all." 

This was the masterstroke — it 
brot a rise immediately if not soon- 
er. She peeled his left arm off the 
back of her dolman and wheeled 
around. "Fur gosh sakes, shut 
up", she hissed. "If you say one 
more word about me going up that 
rattle trap of a fire escape your name 
; s mud and I don't know you." 

"Thass all right" he muttered, 
"maybe they got a better one over to 
Ferry." 

The end. 



Dr. Raymond in History of Art — 
pointing to the picture of The Mar- 
riage at Cana — on the screen. 
"Can anyone name that picture?" 
Peg Horton — loudly waving her 
arm6 — "I know — The Last Supper." 



How is this for a dizzy situation? 

In the foreground seventeen frosh 
are seen piled on two chairs peering 
anxiously over the transom of an 
empty room — "listening to a .Sopho- 
more meeting." Farther down the 
corridor are seen several husky Sophs 
aimlessly wandering toward the 
scene of action. What happened? 

Well — it's too bad you weren't all 
there. •.: . 



\ 



THE STENTOR 



209 



Lake Foresters in 
Franee 

MoBt everyone asks, "Did you meet 
anyone you knew or any one from 
L. F. while you were overseas?" 

I didn't meet anyone I knew, but 
I did .meet one Lake Forester who is 
known, -to ~ some of the readers at 
least. This was Lieut. Charles M. 
Harmon, 5th Sanitary Train, 5th Di- j 
vision. While in Base Hospital 22 
at Bordeaux, Lieut. Harmon, or 
"Chuck" as he is known to old Lake 
Foresters, heard me mention L. F., 
and came over and introduced him- 
self to me. Harmon graduated here 
in 1912. Then he went to Johns 
Hopkins from which hfi graduated, 
later serving interneship in Johns 
Hopkins Hospital. He was married 
in 19.17 and is the proud father of 
one son. "Chuck" enlisted in the fall 
of 1917 and was sent to Fort Ogle- 
thorpe for training. He was then 
assigned to the 5th Division, going 
"overseas" in June 1918. He saw 
action at St. Mihiel and Meuse- 
Argorine, and was on his way to the 
Rhine when taken down with the 
"flu" and evacuated to Base 22. He 
was transferred to General Hospital 
U. S. A., on the transport Pocohontas, 
February 4, 1919, and by this time 
is undoubtedly back in the states. 

The Lake Forester of whom I heard 
is one who is known personally to 



some who are still in school. It 
■vas Dick Steele, ex. '18. 

While in evacuation Hospital No. 
10, near Fleury, northeastern edge 
of the Argonne, I met Second Lieut. 
Todd who has been a Bombing Ob- 
server in the 160 Areo Squadron. 
This squadron had been attached to 
us for the purpose of bombing the i 
Buzeney sector. Todd was shot down 
October 29, 1918, near Buzeney but 
managed to land in our lines. He 
said that Dick was an observer in ! 
his squadron and one of his best 
friends. Dick had gone over in their 
formation on October 29, and had 
been flying on the left flank, rear, 
but had been shot down early in the 
flight. Later Lt. Scanlon, a pilot 
of the 160th told me that Dick had 
reached our lines but had been hit 
by three machine gun bullets, was 
in a hospital, but getting along nice- 
ly. I was able to get no further in- 
formation about Dick. 

Chester R. Davis. 



Service List 

MARY ANDERSON, '05 

1905. Mary Anderson of Hudson, 
Wis., went to France early in the 
year 1918 and was stationed as a 
Y. W. C. A. Secretary at Base Hos- 
pital No. 27 Angers, France, working 
among the nurses. She remained 
there until February 1919 and is at 
present in Paris. 



Lois Chalman of Lewis Institute 
visited Gladys Reichert last week. 



SARAH BURCHILL, '13 

1913. Sarah J. Burchill, 7067 Hill- 
dale Ave., Chicago, acted as secre- 
tary to Rear-Admiral F. F. Fletcher, 
of the War Industries Board, Wash- 
ington, D. C, from December 1917 
to December 1918. Miss Burchill 
is at present in the Industrial Rela- 
tions Dept., of the International Har- 
vester Co., Chicago. 



Margaret Mills entertained Ruth 
Lindquist of Chicago over the week- 
end. 



Margaret and Horaee Horton spent 
several days at their new home in 
Rogers Park. 



BESS McCREA, '13 

1913. Bess McCrea, 1229 Broadway, 
Indianapolis, Ind., left the position as 
assistant City Librarian of Portland, 
Oregon, early in 1918 to do research 
work for the Western Ship Building 
Corporation of Portland, Oregon. 
She entered Red Cross Hut Service 
in October 1918 and sailed for 
France in November 1918. From 
December 1918 to March 1919 she 
had charge of library work in the 




The Original 

"Mable Sykes 




>* 



DIAMOND MEDAL -:- ARTIST -:- PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 

140 North State Street 

(Opposite Fields— cor. State and Randolph Sts.) 

Established at present location since 1 906 
MAKER OF HY- CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 
Phone Central 6341 



210 



THE STENTOR 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN and WOMEN 

RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

Market Square 



Service List--Cont. 

hospital at Mesves, France, but haa 
now been transferred to Treves, 
Germany. 



Sport Cloths, Cricket and 

Tennis 

Flannels in Abundance 




CLOTH SATISFACTION IS 
THE FIRST STEP IN 
CLOTHES SATISFAC- 
TION. 

There is practically no end 
to the variety of fabrics 
here — ready to choose 
from — 

Fabrics having distinction 
and individuality — 

Fabrics of the latest weaves 
and of the finest textures. 

DEPENDABLE FABRICS 

You'll appreciate our rich 
assortment. 

Prices $40, $45, $50 
and upwards 

Jerrems Tailoring appeals to 
men who never overdo — 
especially in clothes. 




Tailor for Young Men 

Three Stores: 

7 North La Salle St. 

3 1 4 S. Michigan Ave. 

71 E. Monroe St. 



K ODA K 

Kodaks and 
Supplies 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 




The dailvj use oi 

KOSMEO CREAM 

and 

KOSMEO POWDER 

and a weekhj visit to 

Mrs. Graham s 
Beauty Skop 

1432 Stevens Blclg. 

will create a perfect 
complexion. 

TRY IT. 



USE BOWMAN'S SAFE MILK 

Perfectly pasteurized milk bottled 

in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephone.: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 101-109 Vine Ave. 



WM. BROMBACHER, '15 

1915. William G. Brombacher, 3917 
Livingston St., N. W., Washington, 
D. C, enlisted January 18, 1918 in 
the Meteorological Service and was 
assigned to the Baltimore Weather 
Bureau. On April 1st, 1918, he was 
transferred to the Bureau of Stan- 
dards, Washington, D. C, in the Aero- 
nautic Instrument Section and was 
mustered out of service in Decem- 
ber 1918 at Camp Meigs with rank of 
1st class sergeant. He is at present 
employed in the Bureau of Stan- 
dards. 



RALPH H. DEAN, '16 

1916. Ralph H. Dean, Somonauk, 
111., received the commission of 2nd 
lieutenant at the First Officers' Train- 
ing Camp at Ft. Sheridan. He was 
assigned to the 57th U. S. Infantry, 
August 15, 1917 and stationed at 
Leon Springs, Texas. Later at Camp 
Logan he was made a 1st lieutenant 
and in March 1919 was transferred 
to 33rd Inf. stationed at Catun, 
Canal Zone, Panama where he is at 
present. 



FLOYD M. CASJENS, '18 

1918. Floyd M. Casjens, Orange 
City, la., entered the army Septem- 
ber 21, 1917. He was commission- 
ed 2nd Lieutenant Infantry on Au- 
gust 26th, 1918, and assigned to the 
50th Machine Gun Battalion, 17th 
Division, at Camp Beauregard, La. 
He was later put in command of the 
Colored Casual Co. of the Detention 
Camp, and was discharged December 
2nd, 1918. Casjens is at present 
Chief Clerk of the Local Board for 
Sioux County, la. 



H. H. LEITER, '18 

191S. H. H. Leiter, 419 South In- 
diana St., Warsaw, Ind., entered the 
army in December, 1917. After dis- 
charge from the 2nd Regiment Field 
Artillery, he re-enlisted in the 
U. S. M. C. at Indianapolis, Ind., and 
was shipped to Paris Island, S. C. 
He was trained at Quantica, Va., and 
was rated an Expert-Rifleman. At 
present Leiter is salesman for the 
DePuy Mfg. Co.-, of Warsaw; Ind. '- 



THE STENTOR 



211 



J. F. KERRIGAN 

EXPRESSMAN 

Special Attention Given to Students 



TELEPHONE ( 
NUMBERS i 



Residence 675 
Office 384 



<SxSxS><. 



Q 



The v^/uality Tire Go. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Dr. C. W. Young Dr. R. O. Smith 

Dentists 

200 Westminster East 

Office Hours Telephone 110 

9:00 a m. to 1:00 p.m. to 

12:00 m. 5:00 p. m. 

Lake Forest Illinois 



tfllHIlllllllllllllllllUUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIl 

/^JLASS Pins and Rings. 

^"^ Fraternity and Sorority 

Jewelry. Programs. 

SPIES BROS. E£Tcaco 

nimiiiiiniiiniiiiiMiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii 



For Quick Service and the Best of Everything 



-GO TO- 



Kemper & Moore 

RESTAURANT & LUNCH ROOM 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 



509 Central Ave., Highland Park, 111. 



'" :r:i !';r 

/^l For Light 

I T fl C For Heat 

V^I^O for Power 

North Shore Gas Co. 



Telephone 1071 



CARL HANSON 

Wholesale Candies 



Waukegan 



Illinois 



Photographer 
Melvin H. Sykes 

Special Rates to Students 

Central 342 19th Floor Stevens Bldg. 



Lake Forest's only exclusioe 
Dry Goods Store 




Dry Goods 



^yfShopfor 
^Womens&Childrens Furnishings 

South Side of 'Market Square" 



WARNER GATES, '19 

1919. Warner Beardsley Gates, 1126 
Wllmette Ave., Wilmette, 111., entered 
the 1st Officers' Training Camp at 
Fort Sheridan on May 6, 1917. He 
received the commission of 2nd Pro- 
visional Lieutenant in the regular 
army and was assigned to 19th In- 
fantry, Ft. Houston, Texas, from 
where he was sent on guard duty 
among the oil fields of Texas, and 
later in the harbor of Galveston. In 
December 1917 he was promoted to 
1st Lieutenant and sent to Camp 
Perry, Ohio, for special training. He 
spent some time as an instructor of 
automatic rifles at Camp Travis, and 
was appointed Aid-de-camp to Brig. 
Gen. Estes at Camp Upton, N. Y. in 
February 1919. He is now in the 
3 3rd Infantry at Panama Canal Zone. 



GIFFORD HOLDEN, '19 

1919. Gifford M. Holden enlisted in 
the Navy at the Naval Training Sta- 
tion, Great Lakes, on April 19, 1917, 
and later was transferred for duty in 
various locations in the 9th, 10th 
and 11th Naval Districts. He was 
rated Chief Petty Officer, Pay-Corps, 
U. S. Navy on August 23, 1918. He 
was released from active duty on 
February 27th, 1919. Holden is at 
present on the Journal-Transcript, 
Peoria, 111. 



DONALD WOODS, '19 

1919. Donald C. Woods, 416 W. 
Henry St., Pontiac, 111., enlisted in 
the Naval Reserve and entered the 
Officers' Material School at Chicago 
on June 10, 1918. He spent the next 
six months in training at Chicago, 
Cleveland and Pelham Bay and re- 
ceived his commission as Ensign, 
February 1, 1919. He was stationed 
in New York City for a short time 
but was placed on the inactive list 
April 15, 1919. Woods expects to 
return to Lake Forest next fall. 



STANLEY CHANGNON, '20 

1920. Stanley A. Changnon, of St. 
Anne, 111., enlisted in the army May 

14, 1918. He was trained at Camp 
McArthur, Texas, with the 7th Divi- 
sion and sailed for France August 

15. He acted as interpreter for the 
3rd Army Staff Officers and his pres- 
ent address is Co. B, M. P. Battalion, 
3rd Army, A. E F. France. 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents ' Furnishings 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

TEL. 644 LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Lady will sell large 50 In. $250 

size mahogany grand opera phono- 
graph and 200 steel needles and re- 
cords. Used few weeks. Will take 
$74 for outfit and ship C. O. D. on 
approval. Act quick. 
Mrs. Waverly-Brown, 317 Greenleaf 

Ave., Wilmette, 111., near Linden 

Sta. Mil. Electric. 



The 
Calvert Floral Co. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone I 7 Lake Forest, 111. 



LAKE FOREST LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 



Phe 



175 



Why? 

Aslc any good dresser in Lake Forest 



California Fruit Store 

Candy and Ice Cream 

A Complete Line of 

Columbia Grafonolas and Double Disc 

Records 



Call at 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

When in Need of 

NEW RECORDS 

for your Victrola 



TZTTT5T7T CTZ"V Successors 

J\.UrSr!/L.!3J\. I Harry Levin 

Clothing and 
Furnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST. ILL 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



Fitzgerald Taxicab Company 



For Best Service 
Day or Night 



Taxis at All Trains. Call Lake Forest 12 



212 



THE STENTOR 




iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiffliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

at LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

WITH the discontinuance of the S;A.T.C, the college work for the rest of the 
year has been reorganized to suit the changed conditions. But the govern- 
ment arrangement of three terms — instead of the two semesters — continues 
for this year; consequently the third term opened on Tuesday, April 1. 
An unusual number of new courses will begin at that time, so that entering 
students will have an exceptionally good opportunity to arrange schedules. Among 
these courses are the following: English Composition; Victorian Literature; Public 
Speaking; Beginning French; History of Art; Mechanical Drawing; College Algebra 
and Plane Trigonometry; Chemistry and Physics, to those who have had one school 
year in either; General Zoology. 

The environment at Lake Forest is beautiful and the plant adequate; all 
students are fully provided with room and board on the campus. Expenses $300- 
$360 for men; $360-$450 for women. 



Under the same government as the College, but with separate buildings and faculties 
are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys, opened in 1868. 

FERRY HALL — a school for girls, preparatory and Junior College. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC! — with an independent organization, offering 

superior advantages. 
For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, HI. 



JENSEN &SUNDMARK 

SHOES 

We Do Repairing 

Phone 709 Western Avenue. LAKE FOREST 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tioketa 

7 MARKET SQUARE 



C.G. Wenban & Son 

Taxi Cabs 
Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Surra Called For and Delivered 
AW. ZENGLER 

Cleaning • Pressing • Repairing 

STUDENT RATES ON SUITS: 
Cleaning and Pressing . . $1.50 

Pressing ... . .50 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

At 

French's Drug Store 



MULLER 

TEA and SWEET SHOP 
WAUKEGAN 

Phone 2252 



'AMES MITCHELL 
The IEWELER 



J' 
'■ 



Military Watches and 
College Jewelry 



The Market Square Restau- 
rant and Tea Room 

Open 7:00 a- m. to 8:00 p. m. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

ana 

STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 
Combined Capital and Surplus $130,000 



j. L. SMITH 

Representing 

THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

Phonr6?6 

LAKE FOREST, ILL, 



Oscar Pierson 



FURNITURE REPAIRING 
PICTURE FRAMING 



Lake Forest, HI. 



M. H. Hussey & Co. 



Coal Wood 

Coke Lumber Feed 

Building Material 



Tel. 888, 889 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



John Griffith & Sons 

Real Estate Renting 

All branches insurance- written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS